Department of
ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Journalism, Psychology, English)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG322 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION - I 3 2 100
EST331 AMERICAN LITERATURES 5 4 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI 3 3 100
JOU331 MEDIA LAW, ETHICS AND ISSUES 4 4 100
JOU351 FUNDAMENTALS OF NEWSPAPER DESIGN AND LAYOUT 2 2 100
JOU352 BUSINESS JOURNALISM 2 2 100
KAN321 KANNADA 3 03 50
PSY331 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT 5 5 100
PSY351 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - I 2 2 100
SAN321 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM321 TAMIL 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG422 PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION - II 3 2 100
EST431 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY 5 4 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI 3 3 100
JOU431 MEDIA RESEARCH 4 4 100
JOU451A BROADCAST JOURNALISM 4 4 100
JOU451B PHOTO AND DOCUMENTARY JOURNALISM 4 4 100
KAN421 KANNADA 3 03 50
PSY431 BASIC SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 5 5 100
PSY451 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - II 2 2 100
SAN421 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM421 TAMIL 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST531 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES 4 04 100
EST532 INDIAN LITERATURES: THEMES AND CONCERNS 5 4 100
JOU531 DEVELOPMENT JOURNALISM 4 4 100
JOU551 NEW MEDIA JOURNALISM 4 4 100
JOU552 SERVICE LEARNING 2 2 50
JOU581 INTERNSHIP 8 2 50
PSY531 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541A SCHOOL AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541B SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541C CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541D INTRODUCTION OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY551 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-I 2 2 100
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST631 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURES 5 4 100
EST631E ECOLOGICAL DISCOURSES AND PRACTICES 4 4 100
EST641A CULTURAL STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641B INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING 4 04 100
EST641C INTRODUCTION TO SHORT STORY 4 04 100
EST641D INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641F REVISITING INDIAN EPICS 4 4 100
JOU611 ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALISM 2 2 100
JOU612 RESEARCH PAPER 2 2 50
JOU631 INDIAN POLITY AND GOVERNMENT 4 4 100
JOU651 LIFESTYLE JOURNALISM 2 2 100
PSY631 INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641A POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641B MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641C ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE 4 4 100
PSY641D CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR 4 4 100
PSY641E INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641F HEALTH AND WELLBEING 4 4 100
PSY641G COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY651 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-II 2 2 100

AEN321 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course is taught in the second year for students from different streams, namely BA, BSc

 

and BCom. If the first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ

 

University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian voices in English and Indian

 

regional literatures in translation for the Additional English students of the first year, the

 

second year syllabus intends to take that project a little further and open up the engagement

 

of the students to texts from across the world. The syllabus - selection of texts will

 

concentrate on readings from South Asian, Latin American, Australian, Canadian, and Afro-

 

American. It will voice subaltern concerns of identity, gender, race, ethnicity and problems of

 

belongingness experienced by humanity all over the globe.

 

The syllabus will extend the concerns of nation and nationality and marginalization,

 

discussed within the Indian context to a more inclusive and wider global platform. We have

 

consciously kept out ‘mainstream’ writers and concentrated on the voices of the subalterns

 

from across the world. There is an implicit recognition in this project that though the aspects

 

of marginalization and the problems facing subalterns are present across cultures and

 

nations, the experiences, expressions and reflections are specific to each race and culture.

 

The course will address these nuances and specificities and enable our students to become

 

more aware and sensitive to life and reality around them. This will equip the students, who

 

are global citizens, to understand not just the Indian scenario, but also situate themselves

 

within the wider global contexts and understand the spaces they will move into and negotiate

 

in their future.

 

There is a prescribed text book Blends: Voices from Margins for the second year students,

 

compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

Course Objectives

 

The course objectives are

 

 to enable students to look at different cultures through Literature

 

 to help students develop an understanding of subaltern realities and identity politics

 

 to inculcate literary sensibility/taste among students across disciplines

 

 to improve language skills –speaking, reading, writing and listening

 

 to equip the students with tools for developing lateral thinking

 

 to equip students with critical reading and thinking habits

 

 to reiterate the study skills and communication skills they developed in the previous

 

year and extend it.

Learning Outcome

CO1: it will enable students to understand and analyse the nuances of cultures, ethnicities and other diversity around them and become sensitive towards them.

CO2 : They will be able to critique literature from a cultural, ethical, social and political perspectives

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Children?s Novel
 

TetsukoKuroyanagi: Tottochan: The Little Girl at the Window12

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Short Story
 

Liliana Heker : “The Stolen Party

 

 Higuchi Ichiyo: “Separate Ways”

 

 Harukki Murakami "Birthday Girl"

 

 Luisa Valenzuela: “I’m your Horse in the Night”

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Poetry
 

Poetry 12 Hrs

 

 Silvio Curbelo: “Summer Storm”

 

 Nancy Morejon: “Black Woman”

 

 Ruben Dario: “To Roosevelt”

 

 Mina Asadi: “A Ring to me is a Bondage”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Essay
 

Essay 9Hrs

 

 Amy Tan: “Mother Tongue

 

 Linda Hogan: “Waking Up the Rake”

 

 Isabelle Allande: “Open Veins of Latin America”

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blends Book II

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Oxford Encyclopeadia on Latin American History

Children's Literature -  Kimberley Reynolds (CUP)

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: A written test for 20 marks. It can be an Open Book test, a classroom assignment, an

 

objective or descriptive test pertaining to the texts and ideas discussed in class.

 

CIA2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 works

 

CIA 3: This is to be a creative test/ project in small groups by students. They may do

 

Collages, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes, presentations, debates,

 

charts or any other creative test for 20 marks. This test should allow the students to explore

 

their creativity and engage with the real world around them and marks can be allotted to

 

students depending on how much they are able to link the ideas and discussions in the texts

 

to the world around them.

 

Question Paper Pattern

 

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

Section A: 4x5= 20

 

Section B: 2x15=30

 

Total 50

 

End Semester Exam: 3 hrs

 

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

 

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

 

Total 50

ENG322 - PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Objectives

·         To enable learners to understand the basic nuances of communication

·         To enable learners to judge audience perception in communication

·         To enable learners to understand basic psychological aspects required in communication

·         To enable learners to write for various purposes of communication

·         To enable leaners to use appropriate means of oral communication

Learning Outcome

CO1: ability to judge audience requirements in oral and written communication and communicate accordingly

CO2: ability to use specific styles in communication to be effective

CO3: ability to understand workplace structures and requirements to communicate

CO4: ability to handle difficulties and challenges in communication

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Professional Communication
 

 

Scope

Objectives

Methods (oral, written and non-verbal)

Barriers

Audience psychology

Perception, attitudes, beliefs, values, norms and experiences

Types (vertical, horizontal, diagonal and grapevine)

Importance of listening

Empathy and emotional intelligence

Gender

 

(A set of case studies must be used to enable learners to understand the above topics)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Oral Communication
 

Meetings and minutes writing

Teleconference and conference

Negotiation

Telephone conversation

Impression management

Conflict management

Corporate governance

 

(To be taught using sample videos, case studies and sample practice in class)

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Written communication
 

Business communication

Job application and resumes

Testimonials

Notification and agenda

Memos

Circulars

Brochures and pamphlets

Tenders

Email writing

User manual

 

(To be taught using samples of the above mentioned categories and through case studies)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Reading List

13. Communication Goals and Approaches – Ronald Adler

14. The Interpersonal Communication - Joseph A Devito

15. Business Networking: The Survival Guide - Will Kintish

16. The Definitive Book of Body Language - Barbara and Allan Pease

17. Active Listening 101: How to Turn Down Your Volume to Turn Up Your Communication Skills - Emilia Hardman

18.  Power Listening: Mastering the Most Critical Business Skill of All - Bernard T. Ferrari

 

19. Conflict 101 - Susan H. Shearouse

20. Shine: How to Survive and Thrive at Work - Chris Baréz-Brown

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Communication Skills.         -  Leena Sen.

2. Technical Communication: Principles & practice   -Meenakshi Raman & Sangeetha Sharma.

3. Business Communication.     - Prakash Singh & Meenakshi Raman

4. Business Communication       - Jain V.K   & O.P.Biyani 

5. Essentials of business Communication –Mary Ellen Guffey.

6. Excellence in Business Communication – John Thill & Courtland.L.Bovee

7. Business Communication - Kitty .O.Locker & Stephen Kyo.

8. Successful Writing at work – Philip.C. Kolin

9. Business Communication for Success – Scott.Mc Lean.

10. Basic Business Communication   - Lesikar & Flatley

11.  Emotional Intelligence – Daniel Goleman

12. Emotional Intelligence at Work - Dalip Singh

Evaluation Pattern

Examination & Assessments

CIA (weight) = 50 marks

ESE (weight) = 50 marks

 

CIA 1= 20 marks (weightage 10%)

The assignment could be based on case study analysis or video analysis of a certain aspect in communication

 

CIA 2= 50 marks (weightage 25%)

The CIA 2 would be a submission assignment based on the topics covered. The teachers may choose one or more combinations of the communication aspects covered and provide a single topic or multiple sub-topics for the written submission.

 

CIA 3 =20 marks (weightage 10%)

This assignment can be an oral task to ensure the oral communication section is tested. The task maybe done in groups to check various aspects covered under the unit.

 

Attendance = 5%

 

ESE = 50 marks

Portfolio Submission

The learners are expected to file every class assignment and tasks done during the semester. The portfolio must have at least one assignment for every main topic covered under each unit.

EST331 - AMERICAN LITERATURES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

  • To introduce the students to the socio-political, religious and cultural aspects of America through literary texts
  • To enable students to  read texts as products of  historical, political and cultural context
  • To provide insights into different styles of writing over different centuries
  • To encourage clear understanding of different genres and prosody/forms/literary devices.
  • To enable learners to give their perspective on the texts prescribed
  • To brainstorm learners to use their knowledge of History, Psychology, Sociology, etc to read literary works

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify different influences on American literature & Provide an account of European colonization of American

CO2: Demonstrate a familiarity with native America literature

CO3: Use American history to analyze different pieces of American literature

CO4: Trace the development of American literature through different eras

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Beginnings to 1700
 

Description: This unit will introduce American History and literature. An outline of important events would be briefed.

  • The Navajo Creation Story
  • John Smith- The New Land
  • Anne Bradstreet – In Honour of that Highness
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
1700-1820
 

Description: This unit will move further into specific texts relevant to the century and sensitize learners in that direction. 

  • Doctor Richard Shuckburgh- Yankee Doodle (popular version)
  • Benjamin Franklin- Rules by which a Great Empire...
  • Sarah Wentworth Morton- Stanzas to a Husband Recently United
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
1820- 1900
 

Description: This unit will provide a variety in terms of different kinds of literature that the particular century has produced and provide contexts as and when required

  • James Lowell- Stanzas on Freedom
  • Washington Irving- Rip Van Winkle
  • Emerson- I Become a Transparent Eyeball/Brahma
  • Hawthorne- Young Goodman Brown
  • Martin Luther King- I have a Dream (speech)
  • Longfellow- My Lost youth
  • Douglas- What the Black Man Wants
  • Whitman- A noiseless Patient Spider
  • Dickinson- I years had been from Home
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe- Excerpts- Uncle Tom’s Cabin
  • Kate Chopin- Lilacs
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
1900-1945
 

Description: This unit will provide a variety in terms of different kinds of literature that the particular century has produced and provide contexts as and when required.

  • Hemingway- The Snows of Kilimanjaro
  • Frost- Meeting and Passing
  • Ezra Pound- An Immorality
  • Langston Hughes- Daybreak in Alabama
  • Fitzgerald- The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
  • Cummings- Even a Pencil has Fear to
  • Ginsberg- Howl or A Supermarket in California
  • Eugene O Neill- The Emperor Jones or Hairy Ape
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
1945- Contemporary
 

Description: This unit will introduce war and the effect of it on the minds of American writers and the society. It will also take the learners through different styles of writing.

  • Alice Walker- The Color Purple
  • Sylvia Plath- Gold Mouths Cry
  • William Burroughs- Naked Lunch
  • James Thurber- A Couple of Hamburgers
Text Books And Reference Books:

Text compiled for internal circulation

Essential Reading

  1. Roger Williams: from A Key into the Language of America
  2. Anne Bradstreet: from Contemplations
  3. Context: Cultures in Contact: Voices from Anglo-American’s “New” World (17C)]
  4. Sarah Kemble Knight (1666-1727)
  5. The journal of Madame Knight
  6. Context: Tradition and Change in Anglo-America
  7. Philip Freneau (1752-1832)
  8. The Indian Student or Force of Nature
  9. Washington Irving (1783-1859)
  10. From A History of New York
  11. James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851)
  12. From The Last of the Mohicans
  13. William Apess (1798-?)
  14. An Indian’s Looking-Glass for the White Man
  15. Context: Indian Voices
  16. Herman Melville (1819-1891)
  17. TheParadise of Bachelors and The Tartarus of Maids
  18. Sarah Margaret Fuller (1810-1850)
  19. From Woman in the Nineteenth Century
  20. From American Literature; Its position in the present time, and prospects for the future
  21. Sojourner Truth (1797
  22. Address to the first Annual Meeting of the American Equal Rights Association
  23. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911)
  24. The colored people in America
  25. Context: Literature and the “Woman Question”
  26. Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo (1808-1890)
  27. An account of the Gold Rush
  28. Context: Voices from the Southwest
  29. Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney (1791-1865)
  30. The suttee
  31. Sherwood Anderson
  32. From Winesburg, Ohio
  33. John Dos Passos
  34. From U.S.A
  35. Elizabeth Bishop
  36. In the waiting room
  37. Tennessee Williams
  38. Portrait of a Madonna
  39. Sylvia Plath
  40. Lady Lazarus
  41. Robert Lowell
  42. Skunk hour
  43. Alice Walker
  44. The child who favoured daughter
  45. Adrienne Rich
  46. Upper Broadway
  47. Gary Snyder
  48. Sixth-month song in the foothills
  49. Vladimir Nabokov
  50. From Lolita
  51. Ralph Ellison
  52. From Invisible Man
  53. Thomas Pynchon
  54. Entropy
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1. Abel, Darrel. American Literature, Volume 1: Colonial and Early National Writing, (ed)
  2. Abel, Darrel. American Literature, Volume 2: Literature of the Atlantic Culture, (ed) Abel, Darrel.
  3. Recent American Literature to 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs Lenthiel H, Volume 3; Barron’s Educational Series
  4. Recent American Literature After 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs, Lenthiel H. Volume 4; Barron’s Educational Series
  5. Literary History of The United States:  (ed) Spiller, Thorp, Johnson, Canby, Ludwig, Third Edition: Revised; Amerind Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd.
  6. The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume 1, Second Edition; (ed) Lauter, Yarborough et al, Heath
  7. The Harper American Literature, Compact Edition; (ed) McQuade, Atwan et al, Harper and Row
Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

 

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Individual or group work

20+20

50

                

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam

 Module

Section A

10 marks

Section B

20 marks

Module I

1

1

Module II

1

 

Module III

1

 

Module IV

 

 

 End Semester Exam

 Module

Section A

15 marks

Section B

20 marks

 

Module I

1

 

 

Module II

1

1

 

Module III

1

1

 

Module IV

1

 

 

 

Section A – 15x4 = 60

Section B – 20x2 = 40

The prescribed texts could form the subject matter of CIA 1 as well as CIA 3.

 

In particular, the texts could be extended to meet CIA 3 requirements.  

FRN321 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the Arts, Science and Commerce UG program

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to communicate with native speakers and make presentations on small topics

CO 2: Proficiency in literary analysis, appreciation and review of poems,play ,films and fables

CO3: Acquaintance of culture, civilization, social values and etiquettes, and gastronomical richness

CO 4: Ability to do formal and informal, oral and written communication.

CO 5: Overall knowledge on functional and communicative aspects and get through a2 level exams.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 1
 

To perform a tribute: artist, work, you are going to…..

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 2
 

Towards a working life

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 3
 

France Seen by...

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 4
 

Mediamania

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme
 

Act 1, 2 & 3

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.        Berthet, Annie, Catherine Hugot et al. Alter Ego + A2. Paris : Hachette, 2012

2.      Gonnet, Georges. Molière- Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme .Paris : Hachette, 1971

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Lichet, Raymond., Puig Rosado. Ecrire à tout le monde. Paris : Hachette, 1980

2.      French websites like Bonjour de France, FluentU French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN321 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:

The detailed text book “Shambook” is a Khanda Kavya written by Jagdeesh Gupta. To improve the creative writing skills, Nibandh, Kahani and Kavitha lekhan are included.Bharathiya chitrakala is also a part of the syllabus to improve the knowledge aboutIndian paintings.

Course Objectives:

Students are exposed to different forms of poetry especially, Khanda Kavya. It will help them to understand the contemporary socio-political issues.By learning about the tradition of Indian painting and legendary painters of India , students get to know about the richness and culture  of the Indian paintings. Creative writing sharpens their thinking, analytical  and writing skills 

Learning Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing asynchronous session assignments and CIAs. ● CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry. ● CO3: Will be able to learn the different aspects of Official correspondence. ● CO4: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs. By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing assignments and CIAs

CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry.

CO3: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs

CO4: To understand the contributions of painters to Indian painting.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Shambooh
 

Khanda Kavya “Shambook” [Poetry] By:Jagdeesh Gupta. Pub: Raj Pal & Sons

 

Level of knowledge:Analitical    

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Creative writing
 

Nibandh lekhan, Katha lekhan, Kavitha lekhan.

Level of knowledge:Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Bharathiya chithrakala -parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav, vikas aur pramukh shailiyam

pramukh kalakar-1.M F Hussain 2.Ravindranath Tagore 3.Raja Ravi Varma 4.Jamini Roy.

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Khanda Kavya”Shambook[Poetry] ByJagdeesh Gupta.Pub: Raj Pal & Sons
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.1. Sugam Hindi Vyakaran – Prof. Vamsidhar and Dharampal Shastry, SikshaBharathi,New Delh

2. Essentials of Screen writing: The art, craft and business of film and television writing

By: Walter Richard.

3. Writing and Script: A very short introduction

By: Robinson, Andrew.

4 .Creative writing By John Singleton

5. Adhunik  Hindi Nibandh By Bhuvaneshwarichandran Saksena.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-wikipedia)

CIA-2(Mid sem examination)

CIA-3(wikipedia article creation)

End semester examination

JOU331 - MEDIA LAW, ETHICS AND ISSUES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to ensure a grounding in law and an understanding of ethics which is an important prerequisite for all journalists.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate clear understanding of media laws

CO2: Interpret and analyse laws pertaining to the media industry.

CO3: Evaluate the existing legal framework related to media industry

CO4: Be able to take ethical stands on controversial issues

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Law
 

Law- meaning, definition, evolution. Law and morality. Types of law- civil and criminal, English common law, need for law in today’s society. Press Legislation - Brief overview of press legislation in India from the British rule to the present. Indian Penal Code, Official Secrets Act, Vernacular Press Act, Censorship and Film Censorship.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Constitutional and Legal Perspectives
 

 

Indian Constitution- Preamble & Fundamental Rights. Freedom of the Press in India, Constitutional guarantee of press freedom under Art. 19(1)(a). Reasonable restrictions under Art 19(2) and Art 19(6). Interpretation of Press Freedom by the Supreme Court. Legislative Privileges- Tension between the legislature and press. Defamation: meaning, definition, civil and criminal defamation, test of defamation, defenses and punitive actions. Libel and Slander. Contempt of Court: Civil and criminal contempt. Defenses for contempt. Right to Information Act. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Regulatory Bodies and Acts
 

 

Need for a code of conduct, Press Commission's, PCI - role and Functions, The Working Journalist Act, Prasar Bharati Act, Self regulation, Source protection, Ownership patterns. The Cinematograph Act, Copyright Act, Whistleblower protection Act, Intellectual Property Rights in India. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Internet and law
 

 

Cyber laws - Information Technology (Amendment) Act 2008, Information Technology (Information Security Practices and Procedures for Protected System) Rules 2018, cyberspace and censorship. Supreme Court’s Aadhar Judgement and the Right to Privacy, Personal Data Protection Bill - 2018. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Case Studies
 

Judgments on Freedom of Speech and expression - Case Studies

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhatia, G. (2018). Offend shock or distrub: Free speech under the indian constition. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Duggal Pavan. (2016). Textbook on Cyber Law (2nd ed.). Gurgaon: Lexis Nexis.

Gupta Ruchika. (2015). Media laws and ethics. New Delhi: Rajat Publications.

Jethmalani,Ram. (2014). Media Law (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Thomson Reuters.

Neelamalar M. (2010). Media Law and Ethics. New Delhi: PHI Learning.

Sethy, N. (2017). Press and Media Laws. New Delhi: Regal Publications.

https://rsf.org/en/ranking.

 

Judgements (thehoot.org)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Chander, H. (2012). Cyber Laws and IT Protection. New delhi: PHI Learning

Hakemulder, J. R., Jonge, F. A. D., & Singh, P. P. (2005). Media Ethics and Laws. New Delhi: Anmol Publications Pvt.Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: 20 marks

An objective test conducted to test the students awareness and knowledge about basic concepts related to media law.

 

CIA 2: 50 Marks

Centralised Mid Sem exam

 

CIA 3: Project (Group Work)

Students have to do a project which will reflect on the the

state of news media currently

 

ESE: 100 Marks

 

Centralised written exam

 

JOU351 - FUNDAMENTALS OF NEWSPAPER DESIGN AND LAYOUT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 This course has been conceptualized in order to introduce newspaper and magazine layout and design concepts.

This course will introduce students to the basics of newspaper design and layout.

Students will learn about the different elements of design, such as typography, color, white space, etc.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to demonstrate the skills related to designing a layout for a newspaper and magazine.

CO2: Students will be able to apply the aesthetics of design in newspaper and magazine layouts.

CO3: Students will be able to learn the work in teams as in a newsroom.

CO4: Students will be able to identify the different types of newspaper layouts and their purposes

CO5: In the end, students will be able to apply the whole production process of newspaper publishing by producing lab journals/newspapers.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding Design and Layout
 
  • Visualizing and planning of a newspaper/magazine, News selection and Placement,

  • Newspaper format: Full format, Tabloid and Magazine

  • Design for Newspapers & Magazines - Trends.

  • Elements of Newspaper Design: Shape, Colour, Texture; Aesthetics- Balance, Contrast, Rhythm, Unity, Harmony, Typography - principles, types and uses of fonts, Colour and Visual representation, Rules: Column Rule, Cut off Rule, Window, White spaces, character count. 

  • Layout: Importance, types; elements, contemporary styles vs traditional styles, Technicalities: Paper sizes, grids, margins, columns, left and right flush, centering, justification, rulers, scaling, page numbering, texture, colour.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Software for Layout and Design
 
  • Basic understanding of softwares for print.
  • Front Page Design /Functional Design /Horizontal design, Modular design, Total page design /Single-theme design, 

  • Preparing Dummy of Newspaper and its different pages

  • Principles of Graphics and their Importance.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Frost, Chris (2017). Designing for Newspapers and Magazines (2nd Edition). Routledge

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Errea, Javier (2018). Newspaper Design: Editorial Design from the World's Best Newsrooms. Gestalten

Schindler, J., & Müller, P. (2018). Does design follow politics? The visualization of political orientation in newspaper page layout. Visual Communication, 17(2), 141-161.

Holmberg, N. (2004). Eye movement patterns and newspaper design factors: An experimental approach.

Harrower, T., & Elman, J. M. (1995). The newspaper designer's handbook (p. 224). WCB, Brown & Benchmark Publishers.

Somuah, E. (2015). The Impact of Layout and Design in Newspapers on Readers: A Study of the Daily Graphic (Doctoral dissertation, Ghana Institute of Journalism).

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

The course shall not have a regular CIA- MSE -ESE model. Instead, the students will report stories, edit and design newsletters and newspapers using softwares both individually and in teams.

Assignments include:

  • Research on Newspaper Layout & Design
  • Newsletter submission 
  • Lab journals

JOU352 - BUSINESS JOURNALISM (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Business Journalism is an introductory course designed to equip aspiring journalists with the basic understanding of India's economy, business environment - both domestic and global and skills and knowledge necessary to appreciate what it takes to be a business reporter. It offers a practical and theoretical foundation, covering topics such as understanding financial markets, analysing corporate organisations, conducting interviews with business leaders, and writing stories on business-related issues. This course also  helps them learn how to make sense of the world of business news, interpret data, and convey the stories behind the numbers effectively to a wide audience to keep them aware of the business affairs in the world and in-turn holding corporations accountable.

Learning Outcome

CO1:: understand key business concepts, such as finance, economics, new age economy and apply them while writing business stories

CO2:: demonstrate reporting and writing skills necessary for business journalism, including sourcing, researching, interviewing, fact-checking, and storytelling techniques

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding the world of business
 
  • Making sense of macro and micro economy

Government policies
Consumer markets, demand and supply

  • Understanding a business organisation and the basics of what makes a balance sheet and a profit and loss statement
  • Indian capital markets

Public markets - stock markets, listing, IPO & FPOs, BSE, NSE

Private markets - funding stages, valuation, VCs/PEs, etc

Stocks, bonds, currencies and commodities

  • Banking

RBI - monetary policies, MPCs

PSUs and private banking

  • Beat reporting 

Technology/Pharma/Retail/Energy

New economy/Internet Tech/startups

Pitching stories and Reporting Practice

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Writing business stories
 

How to find good business stories?

  • Tracking news
  • Key events (macro and micro)
  • Filings

How to take effective notes?

  • Flagging
  1. Key points
  2. Interesting story ideas
  3. Follow up
  • Timestamp

How to write compelling business stories?

  • Building sources
  • Maintaining balance in stories
  • Addressing key arguments
  • Setting context

 

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Reading of Business Dailies like Business Standard, The Mint, The Financial Times etc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  • Venkateswaran, R.J.(2000).How to Excel in Business Journalism. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Private ltd.
  • Arora, D.D. (2003). Business Journalism.New Delhi Saloni Publishing House 
  • Hayes, Keith (2014). Business Journalism: How to Report on Business and Economics. Apress; 1st ed. edition
Evaluation Pattern

CIA Overall (50) + ESE (50)

CIA Overall: (10+20+20) = 50

ESE: 25 + 25 =50

KAN321 - KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Language Kannada is offered to students of third Semester BA/B.Sc as Second language for fifty marks. Students of this semester will study an anthology of Modern Kannada Poetry and an Autobiography of Laxman Gaikwad. This course prepares the students to understand the new era. At the dawn of the twentieth century, B.M. Srikantiah, regarded as the “Father of modern Kannada Literature”, called for a new era of writing original works in modern Kannada while moving away from archaic Kannada forms. Students will study modern Kannada poetry from B.M.Sri to Dalit poet Dr. Siddalingiah. An anthology of modern poetry is selected to understand the beauty of modern Kannada poets through their writings. Uchalya is an autobiographical novel that carries the memories of Laxman Gaikwad right from his childhood till he became an adult. Laxman Gaikwad took birth in a criminal tribe of India belonging to Orissa/ Maharastra. The original text is translated to Kannada by Chandrakantha Pokale.

 

Course Objectives:

Understand and appreciate poetry as a literary art form.

Analyse the various elements of Poetry, such as diction, tone, form, genre, imagery, symbolism, theme, etc.

Appreciates to  learn the elements of autobiography.

Learning Outcome

CO 1: Able to define autobiography

CO2: Outline a personal autobiography

CO3: Delineate different types of autobiography

CO 4: Proficiency in communication skills

CO5 : Understand the principles of translation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Modern Kannada Poetry
 

1. Kariheggadeya Magalu- B.M.Sri

2. Hunnime Ratri- Kuvempu

3. Anna Yagna-Bendre

4.Mankuthimmana Kagga-D.V.G

5.Ikkala- K.S. Narasimha Swamy

6. Kannad padgol- G.P.Rajarathnam

7.Hanathe hachchuttene- G.S.S

8.Adugemane Hudugi-Vaidehi

9. Nehru Nivruttaraguvudilla- Adgaru

10. Nanna Janagalu.-Siddalingaiah

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Autobiography- Uchalya- Lakshman Gayekwad (Marathi)
 

Text: Uchalya

Author:Lakshman Gayekwad

Translation: Chandrakantha Pokle

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Creative Writings
 

 

1 Dialogue Writing

2 Essay writing

3 short story building

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. English Geethegalu- Sri, Publishers: B.M.Sri Smarka Prathistana, Bangalore-19 (2013)

2. Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Volumes 1-4, Editor: G. S. Shivarudrappa, Prasaranga, Bangalore Univeristy.

3. Hosagannada Kavitheya Mele English Kavyada Prabhava- S. Ananthanarayana

4. Hosagannadada Arunodaya- Srinivasa  Havanuru

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Hosagannda Sahitya- L.S. Sheshagiri Rao

2. Kannada Sahitya Sameekshe- G. S. Shivarudrappa

3. Bhavageethe- Dr. S. Prabhushankara

4. My Experiments with Truth- M.K. Gandhi

5. Ouru Keri- Siddalingaiah

Evaluation Pattern
 
Evaluation Pattern
 

CIA-1 Wikipedia Assignments- 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Wikipedia Assignment-20 Marks

Attendance -10 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

 
   

PSY331 - LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been conceptualized in order to provide a general introduction to various developmental concepts across the different stages of the lifespan, with the nature versus nurture debate as a concurrent theme. The course is described through three perspectives: physical, cognitive, and psychosocial. Emphasis will be on the major transitions from fetal development through death in the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains. Research methods in developmental psychology are addressed explicitly and are also addressed alongside each major research study and theory discussed. This course includes discussion on the influences of cultural issues and technological advancements. This course addresses classic developmental theories and research as well as provides an overview of current developmental topics across the lifespan.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Define basic concepts, issues, debates and theories in the field of developmental psychology.

CO2: Explain human development as progressing through different stages and domains.

CO3: Identify the role of family, peers and community in influencing development at different stages

CO4: Explain scientific research methods used to study human development.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Importance of Life-span Development; Historical Perspective; Characteristics of Life-span Development; Nature of Development; Overview of Theories of Development: Freud, Erikson, Piaget, Vygotsky, Information processing, Behavioural, Socio-Cognitive, Ethological and Ecological theories; Major Issues and Debates in Developmental Psychology; Studying Development - Sequential, Cross-sectional and Longitudinal approaches.          

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Physical Development
 

Stages of prenatal development; Teratogens and prenatal environment; Birth, newborn appearance, reflexes, assessment and states; Physical and motor development - in childhood: cephalocaudal and proximodistal pattern, gross and fine motor skills and handedness; Puberty and adolescent changes: Meaning of  puberty, biological changes, sexual maturation, growth spurt, primary and secondary sexual characteristics; Adult development and Ageing - Biological; Assessments in studying development.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Cognitive Development
 

Stages of Cognitive Development - Piaget's Theory: Milestones and Mechanisms; Vygotsky’s Theory; Language development; Observations & Experiment Methods in studying development.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Psycho-social development (Development of self)
 

Emotions; Temperament; Development of self-concept; Play; Aggression and altruism; Moral Development: Kohlberg’s theory; Development of identity: Erikson and Marcia’s views; Gender differences and gender role standards; Use of field experiments to study development.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Psycho-social Development (Socio- cultural Influences)
 

Development of Attachment: Bowlby’s theory; Adolescent relationships: Family, peers, adult society, adult life; Vocational adjustment; Foundations of intimate relationships: friendship, love, and sexuality; Marriage: Marital adjustment and conditions influencing it; Parenthood and parenting styles: adjustment to parenthood; Coping with Mid-life crisis, changes in relationship; Ageing and theories of ageing; Coping with death, stages and patterns of grieving; Cultural differences: Indian philosophy- four stages of a life and expectations; Use of questionnaires and interviews to study development; Ethical considerations in developmental research.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Santrock, J. W. (2018). A Topical Approach to Life-span Development (9th Ed.). McGraw-Hill Education.
Berk, L. C. (2008). Child Development. Prentice Hall of India (Pvt) Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Papalia, D. E. (2004). Human Development (9th Ed.). Tata McGraw Hill.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Continuous Internal Assesment) - Total Marks - 50    

  • CIA I   – Activity-based Individual Assignment  - 10 Marks    
  • CIA II  – Mid Semester Examination- Case/Scenario-based Questions- 25 Marks; Department Level                  
  • CIA III – Individual Assignment                        - 10 Marks
  • Attendance                                     = 5 Marks 

ESE (End Semester Examination) : Total Marks - 50, 02 Hours

Question paper pattern

  • Section A (Short Answers)                 2 Marks x 5Qs = 10 Marks
  • Section B (Essay Type)                      10 Marks x 3Qs = 30 Marks
  • Section C (Compulsory: Case Study)  10Marks x 1Qs = 10 Marks

PSY351 - PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The coursework aims to provide undergraduate psychology students knowledge and hands-on practice of experimental psychology and statistics. The course imparts training in classic as well as contemporary experiments in the field of Psychology. Students will conduct experiments in the field of Psychology from the domains of learning and cognition. In the process they will be provided an understanding of central concepts in the field such as designing an experiment, variables, hypothesis etc. This course is planned to provide a framework for the development of assessment practices. Attention will be given to issues of identifying and selecting test instruments, conducting the assessment process in an ethical and considerate manner, interpreting norm referenced and criterion referenced test scores and writing APA style reports. The course introduces students to computer assisted experiments. The course would help students to evaluate, modify and develop psychological experiments. Statistical techniques covered will include descriptive statistics including concept of normality, measures of central tendency and dispersion, and pie charts and graphs, as well as use of a common statistical program (SPSS) to analyze data. Laboratory periods stress the techniques of data analysis using computers.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic principles of experimental psychology.

CO2: Conduct, Score, Interpret and Report psychological experiments following ethical protocols and APA guidelines.

CO3: Analyze experimental data with the knowledge of basic statistical techniques and software packages like SPSS, MS-Excel or JAMOVI.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Ethical Standards in Psychological Testing
 

Ethical issues in research (APA)- consent, confidentiality, Standards of reporting, Plagiarism, Ethical issues in report writing for tests and experiments, style of writing (scientific, unbiased, objective)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Psychological Experiments
 

This module will draw a sketch of the movement of Experimental Psychology in the disciplinary history, highlight and discuss some distinctive features of conducting experiments in human subjects including use of theories, establishing hypothesis and designing experiments. The module also critically looks at the ethicality and contemporary understanding of this method. The student would conduct minimum six experiments including at least two computer assisted experiments. Computer assisted include but not limited to PEBL, E-Prime, Z-tree.

Topics: Perception, Illusion, Dexterity, Attention, Reaction time 

Suggested Experiments and tools for Demonstration/ to conduct : Size weight Illusion, Finger and tweezer Dexterity, Depth Perception, tachistoscope, Reaction time apparatus, colour blindness, Muller-lyer, Minnesota Rate of Manipulation Test (MRMT), Stroop test, division of attention

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Statistics
 

Relevance of Statistics in Psychological Research; Descriptive Statistics; Variables and Constants; Scales of Measurement, Normality, Presentation of data: Graphs (Bar diagram, Pie chart, Histogram) Group and Ungrouped data: Mean, Median, Mode. Introduction to Statistical packages; Data analysis (SPSS/ Excel/ Word)

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

American Psychological Association (2002). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. www.apa.org/ethics/code2002.html (Standard 9:Assessment)

Cohen, R. J. & Swerdlik, M. E. (2013). Psychological Testing and Assessment: An Introduction to Tests and Measurement (Eighth Edition). McGraw-Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Coolican, H. (2006). Introduction to Research Methodology in Psychology. Hodder Arnold.

Gravetter, F.J. &Wallnau, L.B. (2009).Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (9th Ed.). Cengage Learning.

Martin, D. W. (2008). Doing psychology experiments. Thomson-Wadsworth.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA (Continuous Internal Evaluations) – Total Marks - 100 

  • CIA 1: Lab Report (20 marks) + Class participation and Supervisor Feedback (05 marks) = 25 Marks 

  • CIA 2: Lab Report (20 marks) + Class participation and Supervisor Feedback (05 marks) = 25 Marks 

  • CIA 3: Department Level Exam =  50 marks 

SAN321 - SANSKRIT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Sundara Kanda is the only chapter of the Ramayana in which the hero is not Rama, but rather Hanuman. The work depicts the adventures of Hanuman and his selflessness, strength, and devotion to Rama are emphasized in the text. Bhoja only wrote 5 kāṇdas (up to the Sundarakāṇda), and there is a story about this: that he was inspired to write this work the night before a battle, that as he finished the Sundarakāṇda it was time to go, and that he announced that the Yuddhakāṇda would be enacted in the battlefield against the invader, but sadly he never returned. Others have composed a Yuddhakāṇda to complete the work.

The main objective of the students is to understand the champu Kavyas based on the sam.  

The Origin and development of the Champu.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To analyse the content of the text in detail with examples

CO2: To Deliberate the classification and characters of the epic

CO3: To understand the delight of the text.

CO4: To demonstrate an increased ability to read and understand Sanskrit texts

CO5: To understand the prefixes and suffixes and changing the sentences in grammar.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:35
champu
 

Origin and developmetn of Champu kavyas

Five Important Champus

Level of knowledge: Basic/conceptual/ Analytical

Shlokas 1 -60 Hnumantha¨s voyage to Lanka and searching for Seetha Description of city Lanka , Characters of Champu Kavya 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Grammar
 

Prayogas and Krudantha

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Language skills
 

Translation of Given passage from English to Sanskrit 

Writing composition in sanskrit on the given topic in Sanskrit

Text Books And Reference Books:

Sundarakanda from Bhaja´s Champu Ramayana 

Chitrakalayaa: ugagamam vikaasam ca

origin and development of painting through Vedas and Puranas

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

   

Reference Books:-

 

1)      Sundarakanda from “Champuramayana of Bhoja  

2)      Sanskrit Grammar by M.R. Kale.

3)       History of Sanskrit literature by Dr.M.S. Shivakumaraswamy.

4)       History of Sanskrit literature by Krishnamachari.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 Wikipedia assignment

CIA 2 mid semester examination

CIA 3 Wikipedia assignment

TAM321 - TAMIL (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Araillakiyam, bakthi illakiyam, ikala illakiyamn the major allakiyams.The influence myths and puranas are delineated through the good deeds for a better lifestyle.The  Cultural Studies part will have an overview of Indian painting both traditional and modern with special reference to mythology and literature

India 2020- Abdul Kalam

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Recall and categorize the concepts of literature.

CO2: Understand the true essence of the texts, and inculcate them in their daily lives.

CO3: Recognize and apply the moral values and ethics in their learning.

CO4: Comprehend the concepts in literature and appreciate the literary text.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Ara illakiyam
 

1. Thirukural

2. Avvai kural

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bhakthi illakiyam
 

1. Thiru vasagam

2. Kambar andhadhi

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ik kaala illakiyam
 

Naatu pura padalgal

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Prose
 

India 2020- Dr. Abdul Kalam

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Common Topic and visual text
 

1. Common topic: Oviyam

2. Visual text : nattupuviyal

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Grammer
 

Sollu illakanam

Text Books And Reference Books:

Thirukkural-Bhoombugar pathipagam- puliyur kesigan urai, Chennai- 08

Kammbarin Ainthu noolgal- Vanathi pathupagam- Dr. R. Rajagopalachariyar,  Chennai- 18

Nathu pura illakiyam- Ki Va jaganathan- malai aruvi- Monarch achagam- chennai

India 2020- APJ Abdul kalam- puthaiyuram aandugaluku aga oru thoali nooku,  New century book house, chennai

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Thirukkural-Bhoombugar pathipagam- puliyur kesigan urai, Chennai- 08

Kammbarin Ainthu noolgal- Vanathi pathupagam- Dr. R. Rajagopalachariyar,  Chennai- 18

Nathu pura illakiyam- Ki Va jaganathan- malai aruvi- Monarch achagam- chennai

India 2020- APJ Abdul kalam- puthaiyuram aandugaluku aga oru thoali nooku,  New century book house, chennai

Tamizhar nattup padagal - N Vanamamalai, New century book house, Chennai

 

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

EXAMINATION AND ASSIGNMENTS: There is a continuous evaluation both at the formal and informal levels. The language skills and the ability to evaluate a text will be assessed

This paper will have a total of 50 marks shared equally by End Semester Exam (ESE) and Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) While the ESE is based on theory the CIA will assess the students' critical thinking, leadership qualities, language skills and creativity



AEN421 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is taught in the second year for students from different streams, namely BA, BSc and B Com. If the first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian voices in English and Indian regional literatures in translation for the Additional English students of the first year, the second year syllabus intends to take that project a little further and open up the engagement of the students to texts from across the world. The syllabus - selection of texts will concentrate on readings from South Asian, Latin American, Australian, Canadian, and Afro-American. It will voice subaltern concerns of identity, gender, race, ethnicity and problems of belongingness experienced by humanity all over the globe.

The syllabus will extend the concerns of nation and nationality and marginalization, discussed within the Indian context to a more inclusive and wider global platform. We have consciously kept out ‘mainstream’ writers and concentrated on the voices of the subalterns from across the world. There is an implicit recognition in this project that though the aspects of marginalization and the problems facing subalterns are present across cultures and nations, the experiences, expressions and reflections are specific to each race and culture. The course will address these nuances and specificities and enable our students to become more aware and sensitive to life and reality around them. This will equip the students, who are global citizens, to understand not just the Indian scenario, but also situate themselves within the wider global contexts and understand the spaces they will move into and negotiate in their future.

 

There is a prescribed text book Blends: Voices from Margins for the second year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation. 

The course objectives are

·         to introduce the students to look at different cultures through Literature

·         to help students develop an understanding of subaltern realities and identity politics

·         to inculcate literary sensibility/taste among students across disciplines

·         to improve language skills –speaking, reading, writing and listening

·         to equip the students with tools for developing lateral thinking

·         to equip students with critical reading and thinking habits

·         to enable them to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of subaltern writing, of which this compilation is just a glimpse 

·         to actively engage with the world as a cultural and social space (to be facilitated through proactive CIAs which help students to interact and engage with the realities they face everyday and have come across in these texts)

·         to learn and appreciate India and its place in the world through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts

 

·         to reiterate the study skills and communication skills they developed in the previous year and extend it.  

Learning Outcome

CO1 : CO1: To understand the socio- political concerns in various literatures through short stories, poems and essays

CO2: CO2: To critically read and articulate the non- canonised literatures

CO3: CO3: To analyse and apply these textual themes in a multi- cultural, global and professional space

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Novella
 

Unit 1: Novella

·         Viktor Frankl: “Man’s Search for Meaning”(Excerpts)                                       

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Short Stories
 

Short Story                                                                                                    

·         Anton Chekov: “The Avenger”

·         Chinua Achebe: “Marriage is a Private Affair”

·         Nadine Gordimer: “Train from Rhodesia”

 

·         Wakako Yamuchai: “And the Soul Shall Dance”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Poetry
 

Poetry                                                                                                             12 hrs

·         Octavio Paz: “As One Listens to the Rain”

·         Jamaica Kincaid: “Girl”

·         Derek Walcott: “A Far Cry from Africa”    

 

·         Joseph Brodsky: “Freedom”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Essays
 

·         Alice Walker: Excerpts from “In Search of My Mother’s Gardens”

·         Hannah Arendt: “Men in Dark Times”

Dalai Lama Nobel Acceptance Speech

 

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blends Book II

Viktor Frankl's "Man's Search for Meaning"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Elie Wiesel "Night"

Diary of Anne Frank

Famous Nobel Lectures

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  A written test for 20 marks. It can be an Open Book test, a classroom assignment, an objective or descriptive test pertaining to the texts and ideas discussed in class.  

CIA2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 works

 

CIA 3: This is to be a creative test/ project in small groups by students. They may do Collages, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes, presentations, debates, charts or any other creative test for 20 marks. This test should allow the students to explore their creativity and engage with the real world around them and marks can be allotted to students depending on how much they are able to link the ideas and discussions in the texts to the world around them.

ENG422 - PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION - II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Objectives

·         To enable learners to write for various purposes

·         To enable learners to make presentation of various kinds

·         To enable learners to develop content for various contexts

·         To enable learners to develop technical writing skills

·         To enable leaners to use appropriate means of oral communication

Learning Outcome

CO1: ability to judge audience requirements in oral and written communication and communicate accordingly

CO2: ability to use specific styles in communication to be effective

CO3: ability to understand workplace structures and requirements to communicate

CO4: ability to use written form of communication appropriately

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Report Writing
 

 

-          Paragraphing

-          Editing

-          Ethics of writing

 

 

Case study report

Evaluative report

Operation report

Inspection report

Analytical report

Newspaper reports

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Content writing
 

 

-          Web content writing

-          Scientific Writing

-          Copy writing

-          Travel Writing

-          Medical Writing

-          Article Writing

-          Web Copy writing

-          Copy Editing

-          Blog writing

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Review writing
 

 

-Film review

-Book review

-Gadget review

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Presentation skills
 

 

 

-preparation

-performance

-response

 

 Difference between talks and speeches

Seminar presentation

Elevator pitch presentation

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Interview skills
 

 

 

-Job interviews

-Promotion interviews

-Exit interviews

-Reprimand interviews

-Stress interviews

-Media interviews

-Appraisal interviews

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Confessions of a Public Speaker- Scott Berkun

2. Communication Skills for Project and Programme Managers -Melanie Franklin & Susan Tuttle

3. Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High - Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler

 

4. Difficult Conversations: How to Have Conversations that Matter the Most - Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, Sheila Heen, and Roger Fisher

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
 5. Words That Work In Business: A Practical Guide to Effective Communication in the Workplace - Ike Lasater and Julie Stiles

 

6. Professional Presentations – Malcolm Goodale

 

7. Group Discussion and Interview Skills – Priyadarshi Patnaik

 

8. Using Newspapers in the Classroom – Paul Sanderson

 

9. Business Benchmark – Pre-Intermediate to Intermediate – Norman Whitby

 

10. Business Benchmark – Upperintermediate – Guy Brook- Hart

 

Evaluation Pattern

Examination & Assessments

CIA (weight) = 50 marks

ESE (weight) = 50 marks

 

CIA 1= 20 marks

The assignment could be a written task based on unit 1. Students maybe encouraged to write for newspapers or to write reports for any University events that maybe documented in the website. Students could also be encouraged to assist in writing reports for departments.

 

CIA 2= 50 marks

The CIA 2 would be a submission assignment based on the topics covered. The teachers may choose one or more combinations of the communication aspects covered and provide a single topic or multiple sub-topics for the written submission. The students could be encouraged to write based on topics covered in Unit 2.

 

CIA 3 =20 marks

This assignment can be an oral task to ensure the oral communication section is tested. The task maybe done in groups to check various aspects covered under the unit.

 

ESE = 50 marks

EST431 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to introduce the students to concepts, concerns, critical debates in theorising literary texts and expose them to the applicability of these theoretical frameworks. It will enable students to critically perceive and engage with the production of meanings, significations and negotiations. This paper  will act as a bridge to Cultural Studies; Popular Culture; Indian Literatures; Postcolonial Studies; Ecological Studies and other studies that will be introduced in the final year and English Honours.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Display familiarity with basic theories in literature

CO2: Apply theories as frameworks to analyze literary and other texts

CO3: Debate on the feasibility of theory in application to lived reality

CO4: Demonstrate an understanding of the arguments and limitations of different theoretical perspectives

CO5: Argue for their takes on several theoretical positions with justification

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introducing Theory: Literature and the Need for Criticism and Theory
 

I.1 What is Literature?

I.2 What is Literary Criticism; Literary/Critical Theory?

1.3 Literary Criticism/Theory: Key Ideas: Plato to Leavis 

(An Overview of the development of theory)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
The Linguistic and Inter-disciplinary Turn
 

II. 1. Structuralism

  1. What is Structuralism?
  2. The Project of the Structuralists.
  3. Key Ideas/Theorists: Ferdinand de Saussure and Claude Levi-Strauss

II. 2 Poststructuralism

  1. What is Poststructuralism?
  2. The Project of the Poststructuralists
  3. Key Ideas/Theorist: Deconstruction and Jacques Derrida
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
The Pattern of the Mind, Language and Literature
 

III. 1 Psychoanalysis:

  1. What is Psychoanalysis?
  2. The Project of Psychoanalysis and its working in Literature.
  3. Key Ideas/Theorists: Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan

III. 2 Feminism:

  1. What is Feminism?
  2. Pre-poststructuralist’ Feminist Literary Theory
  3. Poststructuralist Feminist Theory      
  4. Key Ideas/Theorists: Virginia Woolf, Elaine Showalter, Helene Cixous and Julia Kristeva
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Ideology and the Subject: Freedom of Mind and Expression
 

IV. 1 Ideology and Discourse:

  1. What is Ideology?
  2. Key Ideas/Theorists: Karl Marx; Louis Althusser; and Antonio Gramsci
  3. What is Discourse and it implications?
  4. Key Ideas/Theorists:Michel Foucault; New Historicism; Mikhail Bakhtin; Raymond Williams and Cultural Materialism

IV. 2 Race and Postcolonialism: Nations, Nationalisms and Identity

  1. What is Postcolonialism?
  2. The Project of Postcolonialism
  3. Key Ideas/Theorists: Franz Fanon; Homi K Bhabha; Partha Chatterjee
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Theory and Beyond
 

V. 1 Postmodernism: Knowledge and Glocalization

a. What is Modernism and Postmodernism?

b. Key Ideas/Theorists: Jean Baudrillard; Jean-François Lyotard; Giles Deleuze and Felix Guattari

V.2 Ecocriticism: Green Studies and Sustainability

a. What is Ecocriticism?

b. Key Ideas/Theorists: Cheryl Glotfelty and Harold Fromm

V. 3 Narratology: Telling and Retelling Stories

a. What is Narratology ?

b. Key Ideas/Theorists: Gerard Gennette and Vladimir Propp

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Peter Barry: Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1. Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 8th ed. New York: Wardworth, 2005.
  2. Ahmand, Aijaz. In Theory: Classes, Nations, Literatures. Rpt. New Delhi: OUP, 2006.
  3. Culler, Jonathan. The Pursuit of Signs: Semiotics, literature, deconstruction. London/New York: Routledge, 2001. Print.
  4. Devy, G.N., ed. Indian Literary Criticism: Theory and Interpretation. Rpt. Hyderabad: Orient Longman, 2007. Print.
  5. Eagleton, Terry. Literary Theory: An Introduction. 2nd ed. Oxford: Blackwell, 2008
  6. ---. The Function of Criticism. London: Verso, 2005. Print.
  7. Gurrin, Wilfred L, et al. A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature. 5th ed.New York: OUP, 2005. Print.
  8. Habib, M.A.R., ed. A History of Literary Criticism and Theory: From Plato to the Present. Oxford: Blackwell, 2008. Print.
  9. John, Eileen and Dominic McIver Lopes, eds. Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004. Print.
  10. John, Eileen and Dominic McIver Lopes. Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004.
  11. Kapoor, Kapil. Literary Theory: Indian Conceptual Framework. New Delhi: Affiliated East-West Press, 1998. Print.
  12. Klages, Mary. Literary Theory: A Guide for the Perplexed. London: Continuum, 2006
  13. Leitch, Vincent B., ed. The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. New York:Norton, 2001. Print.
  14. Rice, Philip and Patricia Waugh. Modern Literary Theory. 4th ed. London: Hodder Arnold, 2001. Print.
  15. Rivkin, Julie, Michael Ryan, eds. Literary Theory: An Introduction. Rev ed. Oxford: Blackwell, 2003. Print.
  16. Rooney, Ellen ed. Feminist Literary Theory. Cambridge: CUP, 2006. Print.
  17. Waugh, Patricia. Literary Theory and Criticism: An Oxford Guide. Oxford: OUP, 2006. Print
Evaluation Pattern

CIA II: Mid Semester 

Section A: Any 3 questions out of 5. (3x10=30) (Conceptual Questions)

Section B: 1x 20=20. Application question. Compulsory no choice.

Total = 50.

 

CIA I: A class test (open book or otherwise on concepts and application) for 20 marks

CIA III: Any creative test that is application based for 20 marks.

 

End Semester Pattern

Section A: 5x10 =50 (Answer any 5 out of 7) Conceptual Questions alone

Section B: 2x25 = 50 (Answer any 2 out of 3) Application based

 

Total 100

FRN421 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as a second language in the UG program. The method Génération A2 consists of a student's book and an activity book, both included in the digital manual. It consists of 6 units preceded by an initial section of 'Welcome'. Continuing from where A1 left, it aims to enhance learning skills further. The structure of each unit marks a real learning journey into different aspects of the French language and culture.

 

Course Objectives

·       To develop linguistic competencies and sharpen oral and written communicative skills further

·       To enhance awareness of different aspects of francophone civilization.

·       To enrich the learner’s vocabulary

·       To enable learners to engage in and discuss simple topics with ease

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To familiarize students with the French culture and traditions.

CO 2: To equip students with correct grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation.

CO3: To enhance communicative skills.

CO 4: To make them well versed in all the four language skills.

CO5: To make them ready for A2 level Exams.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Festivals and traditions in France
 

Lesson 1: Let’s do the housework!

Lexicon – Lodging, the house, rooms

Grammar – The progressive present tense , possessive pronouns, negative form

Speech act – Protesting and reacting

 Lesson 2: About lodging

Lexicon – Furniture and equipment, household tasks

Grammar – Some adjectives and indefinite pronouns, verbs ‘to read, to break up

                   and to complain’

Speech act – Expressing interest and indifference

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Drama
 

Molière’ s L’Avare – Français facile -Act III Sc 8 onwards

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Culture and tradition
 

Lesson 1: All in form!

Lexicon – The human body: exterior / interior, sickness and medicines

Grammar – Simple past tense and imperfect, recent past, expression of duration

Speech act – Narrating in the past tense

Lesson 2: Accidents and catastrophes

Lexicon – Accidents, natural catastrophes

Grammar – Adjectives and indefinite pronouns: nothing, no one, verbs ‘to say,  to run, to die’

Speech act – Expressing fear and reassuring

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Drama
 

Molière’ s L’Avare – Français facile -Act IV

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
French outside of France
 

Lesson 1: Studying abroad, Happy journey

Lexicon – The educational system, formalities to go abroad

Grammar – Demonstrative pronouns, simple future tense, situating in time

Speech act – Expressing one’s opinion,

 Lesson 2: The weather

Lexicon – The weather

Grammar –Me too, not me, impersonal verbs, verbs ‘ to believe, to follow and to rain’

Speech act – Speaking about the weather, speaking about the future

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Drama
 

Molière’ s  L’Avare – Français facile -Act V

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.    Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A2. Paris : Didier, 2016 

2.     Molière, L’Avare – Français facile

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN421 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The detailed text-book "Ashad ka ek din” is a drama by Mohan Rakeshi, one of the eminent writers of modern Hindi Literature. Hindi journalismis is one of the major unit of this semester. Phrases, idioms, technical and scientific terminology are included in this semester to improve the literary skills.

Course Objectives:

Through the prescribed play and the theatre performance, students can go through the process of experiential learning. Study of Mass media enables them to get practical training. Phrases, idioms, technical and scientific terminology sharpen the language skills of the students.  

 

Learning Outcome

CO1 : Understand the nuances of Hindi theatre.

CO2: Create awareness of the social issues.

CO3: Improve the skill of critical analysis.

CO4: Develop the writing skills for media.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Natak- Ashad Ka Ek Din (Play) by Mohan Rakesh
 

Madhavi (Play) ByBhishma Sahni. Rajpal and Sons, New Delhi - 110006 

Level of knowledge: Analitical

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
SancharMadhyam
 

  •  Report writing,
  • Media Interview                                                                    
  •  Hindi Journalism 
  • Electronic media and Hindi,
  • Print media                                    

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Phrases, Idioms. and Scientific and Technical Terminology
 

1. 50 Nos. Phrases and Idioms for writing the meaning and sentence formation.  

2. 100 Nos. (Hindi equivalent)

Level of knowledge: Basic

Text Books And Reference Books: