Department of
ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Performing Arts, English, Psychology)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG321 ENGLISH-III 3 2 100
EST331 AMERICAN LITERATURES 5 4 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN321 KANNADA 3 03 50
PEP351 PLAYBACK THEATRE 4 2 100
PEP371A REPRESENTATIONS OF BHARATHANATYAM 6 4 100
PEP371B TERMS AND CONCEPTS IN CARNATIC MUSIC 6 4 100
PEP371C CLASSICAL INDIAN THEATRE 6 4 50
PEP381 INTERNSHIP 15 2 100
PSY332 SOCIOCULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR 5 5 100
PSY352 PERSONAL GROWTH 2 2 100
SAN321 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM321 TAMIL 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG421 ENGLISH-IV 3 2 100
EST431 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY 5 4 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN421 KANNADA 3 03 50
PEP451 ART ENTREPRENUERSHIP 5 2 100
PEP471A HISTORY OF BHARATHANATYAM 6 4 100
PEP471B EVOLUTION OF CARNATIC MUSIC 6 4 100
PEP471C MODERN INDIAN THEATRE FROM POST-INDEPENDANCE TO THE PRESENT 5 4 100
PSY432 LIFE-SPAN DEVELOPMENT 5 5 100
PSY452 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS 2 2 100
SAN421 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM421 TAMIL 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST531 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES 4 04 100
EST532 INDIAN LITERATURES: THEMES AND CONCERNS 5 4 100
PEP531A RASA AND BHAVA 5 4 100
PEP531B MUSICAL FORMS IN CARNATIC STYLE 5 4 100
PEP531C INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN THEATRE 5 4 100
PEP551A FORMS OF DANCING 5 4 100
PEP551B KALPITHA SANGEETHAM 5 4 100
PEP551C WESTERN THEATRE PRACTICUM 5 4 100
PSY531 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY532 THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS-I 4 4 100
PSY551 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-I 2 2 100
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST631 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURES 5 4 100
EST631E ECOLOGICAL DISCOURSES AND PRACTICES 4 4 100
EST641A CULTURAL STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641B INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING 4 04 100
EST641C INTRODUCTION TO SHORT STORY 4 04 100
EST641D INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641F REVISITING INDIAN EPICS 4 4 100
PEP631A TRADITION AND INNOVATION 5 4 100
PEP631B TALA AND DECORATIVE ANGAS 5 4 100
PEP631C INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY INDIAN THEATRE 5 4 100
PEP651A FORMS OF DANCING - II 5 4 100
PEP651B MANODHARMA SANGEETHAM 5 4 100
PEP651C THEATRE BEYOND PERFORMANCE 5 4 100
PSY632 THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS-II 4 4 100
PSY641A POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641B MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641C ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE 4 4 100
PSY641D CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR 4 4 100
PSY641E INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641F HEALTH AND WELLBEING 4 4 100
PSY641G COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY651 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-II 2 2 100
VIPEP611 PROSCENIUM THEATRE 3 2 100

AEN321 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course is taught in the second year for students from different streams, namely BA, BSc

 

and BCom. If the first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ

 

University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian voices in English and Indian

 

regional literatures in translation for the Additional English students of the first year, the

 

second year syllabus intends to take that project a little further and open up the engagement

 

of the students to texts from across the world. The syllabus - selection of texts will

 

concentrate on readings from South Asian, Latin American, Australian, Canadian, and Afro-

 

American. It will voice subaltern concerns of identity, gender, race, ethnicity and problems of

 

belongingness experienced by humanity all over the globe.

 

The syllabus will extend the concerns of nation and nationality and marginalization,

 

discussed within the Indian context to a more inclusive and wider global platform. We have

 

consciously kept out ‘mainstream’ writers and concentrated on the voices of the subalterns

 

from across the world. There is an implicit recognition in this project that though the aspects

 

of marginalization and the problems facing subalterns are present across cultures and

 

nations, the experiences, expressions and reflections are specific to each race and culture.

 

The course will address these nuances and specificities and enable our students to become

 

more aware and sensitive to life and reality around them. This will equip the students, who

 

are global citizens, to understand not just the Indian scenario, but also situate themselves

 

within the wider global contexts and understand the spaces they will move into and negotiate

 

in their future.

 

There is a prescribed text book Blends: Voices from Margins for the second year students,

 

compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

Course Objectives

 

The course objectives are

 

 to enable students to look at different cultures through Literature

 

 to help students develop an understanding of subaltern realities and identity politics

 

 to inculcate literary sensibility/taste among students across disciplines

 

 to improve language skills –speaking, reading, writing and listening

 

 to equip the students with tools for developing lateral thinking

 

 to equip students with critical reading and thinking habits

 

 to reiterate the study skills and communication skills they developed in the previous

 

year and extend it.

Learning Outcome

CO1: it will enable students to understand and analyse the nuances of cultures, ethnicities and other diversity around them and become sensitive towards them.

CO2 : They will be able to critique literature from a cultural, ethical, social and political perspectives

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Children?s Novel
 

TetsukoKuroyanagi: Tottochan: The Little Girl at the Window12

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Short Story
 

Liliana Heker : “The Stolen Party

 

 Higuchi Ichiyo: “Separate Ways”

 

 Harukki Murakami "Birthday Girl"

 

 Luisa Valenzuela: “I’m your Horse in the Night”

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Poetry
 

Poetry 12 Hrs

 

 Silvio Curbelo: “Summer Storm”

 

 Nancy Morejon: “Black Woman”

 

 Ruben Dario: “To Roosevelt”

 

 Mina Asadi: “A Ring to me is a Bondage”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Essay
 

Essay 9Hrs

 

 Amy Tan: “Mother Tongue

 

 Linda Hogan: “Waking Up the Rake”

 

 Isabelle Allande: “Open Veins of Latin America”

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blends Book II

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Oxford Encyclopeadia on Latin American History

Children's Literature -  Kimberley Reynolds (CUP)

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: A written test for 20 marks. It can be an Open Book test, a classroom assignment, an

 

objective or descriptive test pertaining to the texts and ideas discussed in class.

 

CIA2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 works

 

CIA 3: This is to be a creative test/ project in small groups by students. They may do

 

Collages, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes, presentations, debates,

 

charts or any other creative test for 20 marks. This test should allow the students to explore

 

their creativity and engage with the real world around them and marks can be allotted to

 

students depending on how much they are able to link the ideas and discussions in the texts

 

to the world around them.

 

Question Paper Pattern

 

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

Section A: 4x5= 20

 

Section B: 2x15=30

 

Total 50

 

End Semester Exam: 3 hrs

 

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

 

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

 

Total 50

ENG321 - ENGLISH-III (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description

English is offered as a course for all the students in BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA F&A classes in the third and fourth semesters. The aim is to strengthen the communication skills, and particularly study skills of the learners further, through adequate practice and exposure to good examples of writing, thought, ideas and human values. In addition, they will be trained in study skills through tasks in academic genres such as message, letter, essay, data interpretation etc. It aims to not only equip learners with skills but also sensitize them towards issues that concern human life in today’s globalised context. The course content is selected to meet the requirements of the departmental goal of “empowering the individual to read oneself, the social context and the imagined”; institutional goal of ensuring “holistic development”; and the national goal of creating competent and valuable citizens. The primary objective of this course is to help learners develop appropriate employability skills and demonstrate suitable conduct with regards to communication skills. The units are organised in order to help the learners understand the academic and workplace demands and learn by practice.

 

Course Objectives     

 

 

·       To enable learners to develop reading comprehension for various purposes

 

·       To enable learners to develop writing skills for academic and professional needs

 

·       To enable learners to develop the ability to think critically and express logically

 

·       To enable learner to communicate in a socially and ethically acceptable manner

 

·       To enable learners, to read, write and speak with clarity, precision and accuracy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Recognise the errors of usage and correct them. Recognize their own ability to improve their own competence in using the language

CO2: Read independently unfamiliar texts with comprehension. Read longer texts, compare, and evaluate them.

CO3: Understand the importance of writing in academic life. Write simple sentences without committing errors in spelling and grammar. Plan a piece of writing using drafting techniques.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to university grammar
 

 

Subject verb agreement

 

Tenses

 

Preposition

 

Voices

 

Clauses

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Strategies for Reading
 

 

Skimming and scanning

 

Strategies of reading

 

Reading and understanding reports

 

Reading content/ texts of various kinds

 

Inferencing skills

 

Academic vocab

 

Academic phrases

 

Professional expression

 

Study skills- library and referencing skills (organising reading, making notes, managing time, prioritising)

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Strategic writing for academic purpose
 

 

Mind mapping

 

Organising ideas

 

Accurate usage of vocabulary

 

Paragraph strategy

 

Cohesion and sequencing (jumbled sentences to paragraph)

 

Extended writing 

 

Formal and informal writing

 

Reports (all types including illustration to report and report to illustration and/or graphs, charts, tables and other statistical data)

 

Proposal writing (for projects, for research)

 

Academic essays/ articles

 

Persuasive writing, extrapolative writings

 

Case study writing

 

Executive summaries

 

Editing, proofreading skills

 

Resume vs CV

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Listening and Oral communication
 

 

Self-introduction

 

Body language

 

Talks, speeches and presentations

 

Conversation

 

Telephone conversation

 

Meetings

 

Group discussion

 

Seminar / conference presentation

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Business communication
 

 

Principles of communication

 

Process of communication

 

Types of communication

Barriers in communication

Text Books And Reference Books:

NIL

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

ENGlogue -2

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test/ written or oral tasks for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester exam for 50 marks.

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any creative assignments.

 

 End- semester 50 marks 

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EST331 - AMERICAN LITERATURES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

  • To introduce the students to the socio-political, religious and cultural aspects of America through literary texts
  • To enable students to  read texts as products of  historical, political and cultural context
  • To provide insights into different styles of writing over different centuries
  • To encourage clear understanding of different genres and prosody/forms/literary devices.
  • To enable learners to give their perspective on the texts prescribed
  • To brainstorm learners to use their knowledge of History, Psychology, Sociology, etc to read literary works

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify different influences on American literature & Provide an account of European colonization of American

CO2: Demonstrate a familiarity with native America literature

CO3: Use American history to analyze different pieces of American literature

CO4: Trace the development of American literature through different eras

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Beginnings to 1700
 

Description: This unit will introduce American History and literature. An outline of important events would be briefed.

  • The Navajo Creation Story
  • John Smith- The New Land
  • Anne Bradstreet – In Honour of that Highness
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
1700-1820
 

Description: This unit will move further into specific texts relevant to the century and sensitize learners in that direction. 

  • Doctor Richard Shuckburgh- Yankee Doodle (popular version)
  • Benjamin Franklin- Rules by which a Great Empire...
  • Sarah Wentworth Morton- Stanzas to a Husband Recently United
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
1820- 1900
 

Description: This unit will provide a variety in terms of different kinds of literature that the particular century has produced and provide contexts as and when required

  • James Lowell- Stanzas on Freedom
  • Washington Irving- Rip Van Winkle
  • Emerson- I Become a Transparent Eyeball/Brahma
  • Hawthorne- Young Goodman Brown
  • Martin Luther King- I have a Dream (speech)
  • Longfellow- My Lost youth
  • Douglas- What the Black Man Wants
  • Whitman- A noiseless Patient Spider
  • Dickinson- I years had been from Home
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe- Excerpts- Uncle Tom’s Cabin
  • Kate Chopin- Lilacs
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
1900-1945
 

Description: This unit will provide a variety in terms of different kinds of literature that the particular century has produced and provide contexts as and when required.

  • Hemingway- The Snows of Kilimanjaro
  • Frost- Meeting and Passing
  • Ezra Pound- An Immorality
  • Langston Hughes- Daybreak in Alabama
  • Fitzgerald- The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
  • Cummings- Even a Pencil has Fear to
  • Ginsberg- Howl or A Supermarket in California
  • Eugene O Neill- The Emperor Jones or Hairy Ape
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
1945- Contemporary
 

Description: This unit will introduce war and the effect of it on the minds of American writers and the society. It will also take the learners through different styles of writing.

  • Alice Walker- The Color Purple
  • Sylvia Plath- Gold Mouths Cry
  • William Burroughs- Naked Lunch
  • James Thurber- A Couple of Hamburgers
Text Books And Reference Books:

Text compiled for internal circulation

Essential Reading

  1. Roger Williams: from A Key into the Language of America
  2. Anne Bradstreet: from Contemplations
  3. Context: Cultures in Contact: Voices from Anglo-American’s “New” World (17C)]
  4. Sarah Kemble Knight (1666-1727)
  5. The journal of Madame Knight
  6. Context: Tradition and Change in Anglo-America
  7. Philip Freneau (1752-1832)
  8. The Indian Student or Force of Nature
  9. Washington Irving (1783-1859)
  10. From A History of New York
  11. James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851)
  12. From The Last of the Mohicans
  13. William Apess (1798-?)
  14. An Indian’s Looking-Glass for the White Man
  15. Context: Indian Voices
  16. Herman Melville (1819-1891)
  17. TheParadise of Bachelors and The Tartarus of Maids
  18. Sarah Margaret Fuller (1810-1850)
  19. From Woman in the Nineteenth Century
  20. From American Literature; Its position in the present time, and prospects for the future
  21. Sojourner Truth (1797
  22. Address to the first Annual Meeting of the American Equal Rights Association
  23. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911)
  24. The colored people in America
  25. Context: Literature and the “Woman Question”
  26. Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo (1808-1890)
  27. An account of the Gold Rush
  28. Context: Voices from the Southwest
  29. Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney (1791-1865)
  30. The suttee
  31. Sherwood Anderson
  32. From Winesburg, Ohio
  33. John Dos Passos
  34. From U.S.A
  35. Elizabeth Bishop
  36. In the waiting room
  37. Tennessee Williams
  38. Portrait of a Madonna
  39. Sylvia Plath
  40. Lady Lazarus
  41. Robert Lowell
  42. Skunk hour
  43. Alice Walker
  44. The child who favoured daughter
  45. Adrienne Rich
  46. Upper Broadway
  47. Gary Snyder
  48. Sixth-month song in the foothills
  49. Vladimir Nabokov
  50. From Lolita
  51. Ralph Ellison
  52. From Invisible Man
  53. Thomas Pynchon
  54. Entropy
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1. Abel, Darrel. American Literature, Volume 1: Colonial and Early National Writing, (ed)
  2. Abel, Darrel. American Literature, Volume 2: Literature of the Atlantic Culture, (ed) Abel, Darrel.
  3. Recent American Literature to 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs Lenthiel H, Volume 3; Barron’s Educational Series
  4. Recent American Literature After 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs, Lenthiel H. Volume 4; Barron’s Educational Series
  5. Literary History of The United States:  (ed) Spiller, Thorp, Johnson, Canby, Ludwig, Third Edition: Revised; Amerind Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd.
  6. The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume 1, Second Edition; (ed) Lauter, Yarborough et al, Heath
  7. The Harper American Literature, Compact Edition; (ed) McQuade, Atwan et al, Harper and Row
Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

 

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Individual or group work

20+20

50

                

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam

 Module

Section A

10 marks

Section B

20 marks

Module I

1

1

Module II

1

 

Module III

1

 

Module IV

 

 

 End Semester Exam

 Module

Section A

15 marks

Section B

20 marks

 

Module I

1

 

 

Module II

1

1

 

Module III

1

1

 

Module IV

1

 

 

 

Section A – 15x4 = 60

Section B – 20x2 = 40

The prescribed texts could form the subject matter of CIA 1 as well as CIA 3.

 

In particular, the texts could be extended to meet CIA 3 requirements.  

FRN321 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the Arts, Science and Commerce UG program

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to communicate with native speakers and make presentations on small topics

CO 2: Proficiency in literary analysis, appreciation and review of poems,play ,films and fables

CO3: Acquaintance of culture, civilization, social values and etiquettes, and gastronomical richness

CO 4: Ability to do formal and informal, oral and written communication.

CO 5: Overall knowledge on functional and communicative aspects and get through a2 level exams.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 1
 

To perform a tribute: artist, work, you are going to…..

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 2
 

Towards a working life

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 3
 

France Seen by...

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 4
 

Mediamania

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme
 

Act 1, 2 & 3

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.        Berthet, Annie, Catherine Hugot et al. Alter Ego + A2. Paris : Hachette, 2012

2.      Gonnet, Georges. Molière- Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme .Paris : Hachette, 1971

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Lichet, Raymond., Puig Rosado. Ecrire à tout le monde. Paris : Hachette, 1980

2.      French websites like Bonjour de France, FluentU French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN321 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:

The detailed text book “Shambook” is a Khanda Kavya written by Jagdeesh Gupta. To improve the creative writing skills, Nibandh, Kahani and Kavitha lekhan are included.Bharathiya chitrakala is also a part of the syllabus to improve the knowledge aboutIndian paintings.

Course Objectives:

Students are exposed to different forms of poetry especially, Khanda Kavya. It will help them to understand the contemporary socio-political issues.By learning about the tradition of Indian painting and legendary painters of India , students get to know about the richness and culture  of the Indian paintings. Creative writing sharpens their thinking, analytical  and writing skills 

Learning Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing asynchronous session assignments and CIAs. ● CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry. ● CO3: Will be able to learn the different aspects of Official correspondence. ● CO4: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs. By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing assignments and CIAs

CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry.

CO3: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs

CO4: To understand the contributions of painters to Indian painting.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Shambooh
 

Khanda Kavya “Shambook” [Poetry] By:Jagdeesh Gupta. Pub: Raj Pal & Sons

 

Level of knowledge:Analitical    

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Creative writing
 

Nibandh lekhan, Katha lekhan, Kavitha lekhan.

Level of knowledge:Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Bharathiya chithrakala -parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav, vikas aur pramukh shailiyam

pramukh kalakar-1.M F Hussain 2.Ravindranath Tagore 3.Raja Ravi Varma 4.Jamini Roy.

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Khanda Kavya”Shambook[Poetry] ByJagdeesh Gupta.Pub: Raj Pal & Sons
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.1. Sugam Hindi Vyakaran – Prof. Vamsidhar and Dharampal Shastry, SikshaBharathi,New Delh

2. Essentials of Screen writing: The art, craft and business of film and television writing

By: Walter Richard.

3. Writing and Script: A very short introduction

By: Robinson, Andrew.

4 .Creative writing By John Singleton

5. Adhunik  Hindi Nibandh By Bhuvaneshwarichandran Saksena.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-wikipedia)

CIA-2(Mid sem examination)

CIA-3(wikipedia article creation)

End semester examination

KAN321 - KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Language Kannada is offered to students of third Semester BA/B.Sc as Second language for fifty marks. Students of this semester will study an anthology of Modern Kannada Poetry and an Autobiography of Laxman Gaikwad. This course prepares the students to understand the new era. At the dawn of the twentieth century, B.M. Srikantiah, regarded as the “Father of modern Kannada Literature”, called for a new era of writing original works in modern Kannada while moving away from archaic Kannada forms. Students will study modern Kannada poetry from B.M.Sri to Dalit poet Dr. Siddalingiah. An anthology of modern poetry is selected to understand the beauty of modern Kannada poets through their writings. Uchalya is an autobiographical novel that carries the memories of Laxman Gaikwad right from his childhood till he became an adult. Laxman Gaikwad took birth in a criminal tribe of India belonging to Orissa/ Maharastra. The original text is translated to Kannada by Chandrakantha Pokale.

 

Course Objectives:

Understand and appreciate poetry as a literary art form.

Analyse the various elements of Poetry, such as diction, tone, form, genre, imagery, symbolism, theme, etc.

Appreciates to  learn the elements of autobiography.

Learning Outcome

CO 1: Able to define autobiography

CO2: Outline a personal autobiography

CO3: Delineate different types of autobiography

CO 4: Proficiency in communication skills

CO5 : Understand the principles of translation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Modern Kannada Poetry
 

1. Kariheggadeya Magalu- B.M.Sri

2. Hunnime Ratri- Kuvempu

3. Anna Yagna-Bendre

4.Mankuthimmana Kagga-D.V.G

5.Ikkala- K.S. Narasimha Swamy

6. Kannad padgol- G.P.Rajarathnam

7.Hanathe hachchuttene- G.S.S

8.Adugemane Hudugi-Vaidehi

9. Nehru Nivruttaraguvudilla- Adgaru

10. Nanna Janagalu.-Siddalingaiah

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Autobiography- Uchalya- Lakshman Gayekwad (Marathi)
 

Text: Uchalya

Author:Lakshman Gayekwad

Translation: Chandrakantha Pokle

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Creative Writings
 

 

1 Dialogue Writing

2 Essay writing

3 short story building

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. English Geethegalu- Sri, Publishers: B.M.Sri Smarka Prathistana, Bangalore-19 (2013)

2. Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Volumes 1-4, Editor: G. S. Shivarudrappa, Prasaranga, Bangalore Univeristy.

3. Hosagannada Kavitheya Mele English Kavyada Prabhava- S. Ananthanarayana

4. Hosagannadada Arunodaya- Srinivasa  Havanuru

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Hosagannda Sahitya- L.S. Sheshagiri Rao

2. Kannada Sahitya Sameekshe- G. S. Shivarudrappa

3. Bhavageethe- Dr. S. Prabhushankara

4. My Experiments with Truth- M.K. Gandhi

5. Ouru Keri- Siddalingaiah

Evaluation Pattern
 
Evaluation Pattern
 

CIA-1 Wikipedia Assignments- 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Wikipedia Assignment-20 Marks

Attendance -10 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

 
   

PEP351 - PLAYBACK THEATRE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a skill enhancement course. This course has been conceptualized in order to Understand and explore basic aspects of Playback Theatre. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To introduce the participants to the basics of Playback Theatre.

CO2: To enable the understanding and interplay of human emotions.

CO3: To make participants work as a team.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Learning the basics of Playback Theatre
 

- An improvisational theatre form of enacting real life stories on the spot without preparation

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
: Beginnings of Playback Theatre
 

·         The sense of story

·         Scene and other forms

·         Being a Playback Actor

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Conducting
 

Conducting

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
: Growing in the world
 

 Growing in the world

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Breathing and voice exercises, knowing fellow actors, team work and cooperation, exaggerating and limiting body expressions, developing alertness and awareness of floor space
 

Breathing and voice exercises, knowing fellow actors, team work and cooperation, exaggerating and limiting body expressions, developing alertness and awareness of floor space

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Rituals of Playback Theatre, acting in different stages of life, real life stories, creative visualizations
 

Rituals of Playback Theatre, acting in different stages of life, real life stories, creative visualizations

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Scene settings, music in stories, activity for the soul, exploring movement with fellow actors
 

Scene settings, music in stories, activity for the soul, exploring movement with fellow actors

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:18
Three Playback theatre shows
 

Performance for institutional assessment

Performance for family and friends

Performance for general public

Text Books And Reference Books:

McCarren, F. M. (1998). Dance pathologies: performance, poetics, medicine. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Schlaich, J., DuPont, B., & Sande, R. (1998). Dance: the art of production. Hightstown, NJ: Princeton Book Co.

Baisya, R. K., & Das, G. G. (2008).Aesthetics in marketing. Los Angeles, CA: Response.

Lal, A. (2009). Theatres of India a concise companion. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

A collection of plays. (2003). Place of publication not identified: Ginn.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

McCarren, F. M. (1998). Dance pathologies: performance, poetics, medicine. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Schlaich, J., DuPont, B., & Sande, R. (1998). Dance: the art of production. Hightstown, NJ: Princeton Book Co.

Baisya, R. K., & Das, G. G. (2008).Aesthetics in marketing. Los Angeles, CA: Response.

Lal, A. (2009). Theatres of India a concise companion. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

A collection of plays. (2003). Place of publication not identified: Ginn.

Evaluation Pattern

Performance for institutional assessment

Performance for family and friends

Performance for general public

PEP371A - REPRESENTATIONS OF BHARATHANATYAM (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The students who choose to specialize in dance, in this course, will gain an understanding of the various representations of Bharatanatyam across diverse aspects of gestures, iconography and notations. The theory will also be well balanced with practical lessons that will include the preliminary items of the repertoire.

Objectives:

·         To advance the knowledge and skill level of the chosen subject.

·         To provide a platform to practically experiment and exhibit the learning of the subject.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Connect and apply knowledge of a given art form to other subject areas and to careers

CO2: Produce creative and analytical portfolios reflecting course development

CO3: Apply and improve learned visual, auditory and performance analysis skills through continued learning

CO4: Application of knowledge acquired of a given art form to other subject areas and careers.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Dance and iconography
 

§ 

Unit 1: Dance and iconography – 6 hrs

·         Discovering the relationship between dance and iconography. (Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Andhra and Orissa)

·         Tracing the royal patronage of dance through ages and expressions of dance through sculptures and paintings in the temples of India.

·         The concept of Lord Shiva (Nataraja) with reference to Indian Dance.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Styles of Bharatanatyam
 

 

Unit 2: Styles of Bharatanatyam – 6 hrs

 

·         Pandanallur

 

·         Vazhavoor

 

·         Tanjore

 

·         Mysore

 

·         Nanjacod

 

·         Mugur

 

Origin and characteristics of the different styles.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction to Treatises written on Indian Dance
 

 

Unit 3: Introduction to Treatises written on Indian Dance. – 6hrs

 

·         Natyashastra

 

·         Abhinaya Darpan

 

·         Dasharupaka

 

·         Sangeetaratnakara

 

·         Lasyaranjana

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Viniyogas
 

·         Asamyutha Hastas (From Pataka to Trishula)

Exploring the various usages of the hastas.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Notations
 

Definition and concept of notations, importance of notation, notating the items learnt in syllabus.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Dance therapy
 

 

Definition, genesis & historical development. Scope & application, Philosophy & principles. Aims & objectives. Developmental movement therapy. Structure of movement therapy sessions. Five stages of movement therapy. Principles of group dance therapy

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Alarippu
 

Invocatory items from the Bharathanatyam recital

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:10
Pushpanjali
 

Invocatory items from the bharathanatyam recital

Unit-9
Teaching Hours:10
Jathiswaram
 

Pure Nritta item of Bharathanatyam

Unit-10
Teaching Hours:5
Kautuwam
 

It is a temple based repertoire which has combination of rhythmic and few poetical verses for abhinaya. It acts as a precursor for elaborate abhinaya numbers which would unfold in the training later.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      

Recommended Reading:

 

1.      Nandagopal, C. (1990). Dance and music in the temple architecture. Delhi: Agam Kala Prakashan.

 

2.      N., & Ghosh, M. (1975). Nandikesvaras Abhinayadarpaṇam: a manual of gesture and posture used in ancient Indian dance and drama; English translation and notes together with the text. Calcutta: Manisha Granthalaya.

 

3.      Muni, B., & Ghosh, M. (1950). The Nāṭyasāstra: a treatise on ancient Indian dramaturgy and histrionics, ascribed to Bharata Muni. Calcutta: Asiatic Society.

 

4.      Laghu Bharatam. (1999). Madras: Shree Bharatalaya.

 

5.      Vaidyanathan, S., & Akela, R. S. (2015). The science of Bharata natyam. New Delhi: Kanishka , Distributors.

 

6.      Unni, N. P. (1998). Nāṭyaśāstra: text with introduction, English translation and indices. Delhi: Nag .

 

7.      Muni, B., & Ghosh, M. (1956). Natyasastra. Calcutta: Manisha Granthalaya.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Recommended Reading:

 

 

 

1.      Nandagopal, C. (1990). Dance and music in the temple architecture. Delhi: Agam Kala Prakashan.

 

 

 

2.      N., & Ghosh, M. (1975). Nandikesvaras Abhinayadarpaṇam: a manual of gesture and posture used in ancient Indian dance and drama; English translation and notes together with the text. Calcutta: Manisha Granthalaya.

 

 

 

3.      Muni, B., & Ghosh, M. (1950). The Nāṭyasāstra: a treatise on ancient Indian dramaturgy and histrionics, ascribed to Bharata Muni. Calcutta: Asiatic Society.

 

 

 

4.      Laghu Bharatam. (1999). Madras: Shree Bharatalaya.

 

 

 

5.      Vaidyanathan, S., & Akela, R. S. (2015). The science of Bharata natyam. New Delhi: Kanishka , Distributors.

 

 

 

6.      Unni, N. P. (1998). Nāṭyaśāstra: text with introduction, English translation and indices. Delhi: Nag .

 

 

 

7.      Muni, B., & Ghosh, M. (1956). Natyasastra. Calcutta: Manisha Granthalaya.

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

Examination and Assessment:

 

1. CIA I – Written assignment

 

Written assignment from the portions covered in class.

 

2. CIA II – Mid Semester Examinations

 

This will have two components – Theory (50 marks), Practical (50 marks)

 

Theory: 5 questions to be answered out of 6.

 

Practical: Practical exam from the portions covered in class.

 

3. CIA III – Practical assignment

 

Practical assignment from the portions covered in class.

 

4. End Semester Examinations

 

This will have two components – Theory (50 marks), Practical (50 marks)

 

Theory: 5 questions to be answered out of 6.

 

Practical: Practical exam from the portions covered in class.

 

PEP371B - TERMS AND CONCEPTS IN CARNATIC MUSIC (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The students who choose to specialize in music, in this course, will be exposedto theory of technical terms and concepts at the intermediate level of music knowledge, aaAlong side, their practical will introduce them to the preliminary forms under music.

Learning Outcome

CO 1: Ability to demonstrate the basic technical terms of carnatic music.

CO 2: Ability to identify a good carnatic music performer.

CO 3: Ability to identify the Gamakas of the carnatic music.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Technical terms and their meaning.
 

To know the Technical terms and to know the symbols and meaning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Gayaka Gunas ans Doshas
 

Set the rules and regulations of  to be followed and avoided by the vocalist while singing and the qualities of the vocal artist.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
TECHNICAL TERMS
 

To know the terms and their meanings and symbals.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Mudras figuring in musical compositions.
 

Eight kinds of mudras, its definitions, Symbols and examples

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Taladasa paranas
 

10 Impotant aspects of talas , their defenitions, examples and symbols.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Gamakas
 

How to apply gamakas in compositions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
names of the gamakas, their definitions ,Symbals
 

How to apply Gmakas in compositions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Contribution of Sri Purandaradasar and Saint Tyagarajar.
 

The contributions of THE COMPOSER TO CARNATIC MUSIC.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Event management.
 

Organizing event, venue booking, discussions, poster making, publicity,send e.mails etc...

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
Ragalakshanas
 

Hindolam, Kalyani and Sankarabharanam. Special features of the ragas, Sancharas and Compositions set in these ragas.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
3 Keerthanas in the following Ragas.
 

Hindolam, Kalyani, Suddhasaveri and Kambodhi

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
Practicals
 

1 lakshana geetham,

2. 1 SWARAJATHI

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:5
Rendering musical forms.
 

one Ata tala varna

2 Nottu swaras of Muthuswamy dikshidar

One Patrotic song.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Prof.P.Sambamoorthy. South indian music vol 1,2,3.

Dr.S.V.Leela Indian music series vol. 1,2.

Adictinary of south indian music and Music composers.

Ganamrutha bodhini , Varna sakaram, Keerthana mala

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Varnasagaram. T.K.Govinda rao

Krithi mala BY T.S.Parthasarathy

 100 KEERHANAS OF SRI mUTHUSWAMY DIKSHIDAR BY T.M.Tyagarajan.

Evaluation Pattern

Conducted WRITTEN EXAM, pRACTICAL EXAMS AND cia 1,3.

PEP371C - CLASSICAL INDIAN THEATRE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:50
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces the Performance Tradition of India through the History and Theory of Natyasastra, the Evolution of Sanskrit Drama, Indian Dramaturgy and the Traditional /Folk Indian Theatre art forms of India. The objectives are to advance the chosen subject's knowledge and skill level and provide a platform to exhibit the gained knowledge through practical experiments.

Learning Outcome

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Natyashastra and Indian Dramaturgy: History and Theory