Department of
ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Psychology, Sociology, English)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG121 ENGLISH - I 3 2 100
EST131 BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN 5 4 100
FRN121 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN121 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN121 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY111 ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT 2 2 50
PSY131 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I 5 5 100
SAN121 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
SOC131 FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY-I 5 5 100
TAM121 TAMIL 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG221 ENGLISH - II 3 2 100
EST231 BRITISH LITERATURE: LATE VICTORIAN TO THE PRESENT 5 4 100
FRN221 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN221 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN221 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY211 LIFE SKILL EDUCATION 2 2 50
PSY231 BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - II 5 5 100
SAN221 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
SOC231 FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY - II 5 5 100
TAM221 TAMIL 3 3 100
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG321 ENGLISH-III 3 2 100
EST331 AMERICAN LITERATURES 5 4 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN321 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY311 SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 2 2 50
PSY331 LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT 5 5 100
PSY351 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - I 2 2 100
SAN321 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
SOC331 CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES 5 5 100
TAM321 TAMIL 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG421 ENGLISH-IV 3 2 100
EST431 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY 5 4 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN421 KANNADA 3 03 100
PSY411 SERVICE LEARNING 2 2 50
PSY431 BASIC SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 5 5 100
PSY451 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS - II 2 2 100
SAN421 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
SOC431 STUDY OF INDIAN SOCIETY 5 5 100
TAM421 TAMIL 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST531 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES 4 04 100
EST532 INDIAN LITERATURES: THEMES AND CONCERNS 5 4 100
PSY531 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541B SCHOOL AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541C SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541D CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY541E INTRODUCTION OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY551 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-I 2 2 100
SOC531 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH 4 4 100
SOC541A ANALYSIS OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS 4 4 100
SOC541C SOCIAL ECOLOGY 4 4 100
SOC541D SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION 4 4 100
SOC581 DISSERTATION-I 0 2 100
6 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST631 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURES 5 4 100
EST641A CULTURAL STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641B INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING 4 04 100
EST641C INTRODUCTION TO SHORT STORY 4 04 100
EST641D INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641E ECOLOGICAL DISCOURSES AND PRACTICES 4 4 100
EST641F REVISITING INDIAN EPICS 4 4 100
PSY631 INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641A POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641B MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641C ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE 4 4 100
PSY641D CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR 4 4 100
PSY641E INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641F HEALTH AND WELLBEING 4 4 100
PSY641G COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY651 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-II 2 2 100
PSY681 INTERNSHIP 0 2 50
SOC631 WOMEN AND SOCIETY 4 4 100
SOC641A STUDY OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 4 4 100
SOC641C SOCIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT 4 4 100
SOC641D MEDIA AND SOCIETY 4 4 100
SOC641E CULTURAL AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION OF CONTEMPORARY KOREA 4 4 100
SOC681 DISSERTATION-II 0 2 100
        

  

Assesment Pattern

As detailed in the University student handbook

Examination And Assesments

CIA I,II, III and ESE 

As detailed in the University student handbook

Department Overview:

One of the first departments to be founded in Christ University, the Department of Psychology has grown in leaps and bounds with innovations in curriculum, pedagogy and ground-breaking initiatives. The Department runs a range of programmes that include Certificate courses, Undergraduate programmes, Post Graduate programmes with three specializations and Research degrees in psychology (M.Phil. and PhD). Through these programmes, we encourage students to consider careers and life missions that integrate psychological understanding to life. Our programmes integrate scholarship with professional practice and we offer courses that are cutting edge in the field of psychology. Students who complete programmes in Psychology from the University demonstrate high degrees of self-awareness are service-oriented and are encouraged to embrace humane values in their vocation.

Mission Statement:

The Vision of the Department of Psychology is to promote high academic standards and scholarship in psychology, by creating an optimal and enriching learning environment, fostering ongoing professional and personal development and contributing effectively to societal needs.

Introduction to Program:

BA Psychology, Sociology, English (PSEng) is a three-year triple major programme. The program combines three disciplines which are Psychology, Sociology and English to give students a flavour of both social sciences and humanities and develop their scientific and aesthetic capabilities. The discipline of Psychology is aimed at introducing students to the fundamental processes underlying human behaviour. Students are exposed to various fields of psychology such as Developmental Psychology, Social Psychology, Abnormal Psychology and specific electives. Practical applications of psychology are also demonstrated through experiments, service-learning and experienced through internships. Students are also made aware of the scientific nature of the discipline by engaging in research projects. The discipline of Sociology lays emphasis on the theoretical and methodological functions of Sociology. Equal importance is given to a systematic introduction to the sociological studies in India. Contributions of eminent Indian sociologists and substantial themes of Indian Society are explored. The students are exposed to divergent perspectives with Sociology and acquire the necessary skills to understand various social phenomena through the perspectives of Sociology. Literature is an important cultural product of a society or a nation. Hence, the study of literature offers insights into the worldviews of different societies. This course begins with traditional British literature to the present. The course also introduces students to other literature namely American, World, Postcolonial and also the Indian literature in translation. The course also introduces students to interdisciplinary studies in culture and gender helping them to gain insights from other disciplines like history, anthropology, and sociology.

Program Objective:

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate a coherent understanding and comprehensive knowledge of the fundamental process underlying human behavior in the multidisciplinary learning context

PO2: Demonstrate critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and sensitivity to diversity while applying psychological concepts to everyday life and real-world situations.

PO3: Design, conduct and communicate basic research following fundamental methods and ethical standards in social sciences and humanities

PO4: Use the knowledge of Psychology, Sociology and English to enhance self-awareness, well-being, interpersonal relationships, career-decision making, and social responsibility in personal and professional domains

PO5: Analyze the contemporary world with an awareness of the intersectionality of race, gender, class, sexuality, and national and global history

PO6: Demonstrate an understanding of literatures in English and translation and appreciate the role that historical context plays in the creation and interpretation of literary works

AEN121 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Learning Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

ENG121 - ENGLISH - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities, and politics

CO2: Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO3: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO4: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Unit 1 1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde 2. Shakespeare Sonnet 18
 

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addfitional  material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50 

CIA 3= 20 

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

EST131 - BRITISH LITERATURE: ANGLO SAXON TO EARLY VICTORIAN (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course will serve as an introductory course for British Literature. The course will locate the texts in their respective socio-political and historical contexts. The selection aims to introduce different genres of British literature.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To introduce  students to the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts
  • To help students understand texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes
  • To enable students to identify different forms, genres and subgenres in literature
  • To sensitize students to human values through an exposure to socio-historical concerns of subjectivity, identity, community and nationhood.
  • To sharpen critical appreciation and analytical writing skills through an introduction to models of literary criticism

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to discern the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts

CO2: Students will be able to analyse and critique texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes

CO3: Students will be able to identify different forms, genres and subgenres in literature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
The Anglo-Saxon Period and The Medieval Period
 

Emergence of English language, History of England from 42 BC to Norman Conquest- salient features

 Impact of Norman rule on English social structure, English language in the medieval period,mystery, morality plays and miracle plays, feudalism 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chaucer: The Prioress from Prologue to The Canterbury Tales

William Shakespeare:          

Sonnet 116

‘O that this too solid flesh would melt” Soliloquy by Hamlet in Hamlet Act 1 Scene 2

‘To Be or Not To Be’ Soliloquy by Hamlet in Hamlet Act 3 Scene 1

 

Francis Bacon: “Of Truth”

John Donne: “Canonization”

 

John Milton: Excerpt from Satan’s speech in Book 1, Paradise Lost

John Dryden:  First three stanzas of “Mac Flecknoe”

Alexander Pope: Belinda’s Boudoir from The Rape of the Lock

Addison and Steele: “Character of Will Wimble”

Oliver Goldsmith: “Beau Tibbs”

 

Oliver Goldsmith: She Stoops to Conquer / Christopher Marlowe: Dr. Faustus 

William Wordsworth: “Lines Written in Early Spring”

S.T. Coleridge: “Christabel”

Shelley: “Ode to the Westwind”

Keats: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”

Charles Lamb: “Dream Children”

Mary Shelley: Frankenstein

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 8th Ed. New York: Wardworth, 2005. Print.

Ferguson, Margaret, Mary Jo Salter and Jon Stallworthy. Eds. The Norton Anthology of Poetry. 4th Ed. New York: WW Norton, 1996. Print

Gordden, Malcom, and Michael Lapidge. The Cambridge Companion to Old English Literature. Rpt Cambridge: CUP, 2006. Print.

Gupta, Ambika Sen. Selected College Poems. Rpt. Hyderabad: Orient Longman,   1999.

Herman, Daniel. The Cambridge Companion to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2007. Print.

John, Eileen, and Dominic McIver Lopes. Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004. Print

Maxwell, Richard, and Katie Trumpener. The Cambridge Companion to Fiction in the Romantic Period. Cambridge: CUP, 2008. Print

Sampson, George.The Concise Cambridge History of English Literature, 3rd Ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2005. Print

Ramarao, Vimala. Ed.Explorations. Vol I. Bangalore: Prasaranga, Bangalore University, 2004. Print

 

Shingle, Michael. Daniel Defoe Robinson Crusoe. New York: WW Norton, 1994. Print

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

  1. group presentations on topics relevant to British literature/Art and literary movements
  2. an exhibition/display based on different eras, movements and literary and non-literary genres

 

CIA III will be a moddle test on the Novel

 

These are suggested examples of CIAs. However, during the course of teaching, there could be other suggestions, and CIAs could be slightly modified based on class dynamics and calibre of students.

 

Selected Texts chosen to be taught may be revised / used as extended reading which may be tested in CIA 1, 2 or 3. Example : only 1 soliloquy may be taught.

 

Mid Semester Examination CIA II: 2 Hours

 

Section A: Short Notes – 5x3 marks= 15 (5 questions out of 7)

Section B: Essay Questions – 2x10 marks = 20 (2 questions out of 3)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 1x15 marks = 15 (1 question out of 2)

 

Total: 50 Marks

 

End Semester Examination: 3 Hours

 

Section A: Short Notes – 10x3 marks = 30 (10 questions out of 12)

Section B: Essay Questions – 4x10 marks = 40 (4 questions out of 6)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 2x15 marks = 30 (2 questions out of 4)

 

 

Total: 100 Marks

FRN121 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as a second language in the UG program. The method Génération A1 consists of a student's book and an activity book, both included in the digital manual. It consists of 6 units preceded by an initial section of 'Welcome'. The structure of each unit marks a real learning journey.

 

Course Objectives

·       To develop linguistic competencies and sharpen oral and written communicative skills

·       To familiarize learners to certain aspects of francophone civilization.

·       To enable learners to engage in simple everyday situations

Learning Outcome

CO1: To train the students in correct pronunciation of French.

CO2: To enable students to write correct sentences with appropriate grammar structure and vocabulary.

CO3: To familiarise students with the culture and expressions in French.

CO4: To enhance oral and written comprehension in French.

CO5: To make them proficient in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in French.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
I discover
 

Lesson 1: Good Morning, how are you?

 Lexicon – Countries and nationalities, domestic animals, days of the week

 Grammar -Subject pronouns, verbs ‘to be’ and ‘to have’, definite and indefinite articles

 Speech acts – Greeting, asking how one is

 

Lesson 2: Hello, my name is Agnes.

Lexicon – Months of the year, numbers 0-69, the family

Grammar – Formation of the feminine / plural, possessive adjectives

Speech acts -Introducing oneself and others, asking and saying dates

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

      2.  De Lafontaine, Jean. Les Fables de la Fontaine.

           Paris, 1668

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN121 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The detailed text book “Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha” edited by Dr.N Mohanan is an anthology of contemporary Hindi Poems written by representative poets of Hindi Literature. From the medieval poetry ' Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur ke pad 'is also included.  The poets reflect on the social, cultural and political issues which are prevalent in our society since the medieval period. Hindusthani sangeeth-parampara eva kalakar is one of the module. Since translation is a significant area in language and literature, emphasis is being given on it in the syllabus.Bharath ki pramukh sanskruthik kalayein  Yakshagana,Kathakali,Ram Leela,Krishna Leela etc. included in the syllabus to enrich cultural values among students.

Course Objectves: 

Students will be exposed to read, analyse and appreciate poems by learning poetry. Through translation, students will be able to develop translation skills while translating from other language articles. Students will be able to analyses critically the different cultural art forms by learning about the Famous cultural art forms of India.

Learning Outcome

CO1 : Improve the analytical skills through critical analysis of the poems.

CO2: Analyze the different aspects of Hindustani musical traditions and musicians.

CO3: Enhance the translation skills.

CO4: Improve the basic research skills while doing the CIAs.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection of contemporary Hindi Poems),Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur Ke Pad.
 

’  Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha (Collection ofcontemporary Poems)  Edited By: Mahendra Kulashreshta Rajpal and Son’s, New Delhi

 

Level of knowledge: Analytical

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. 'Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems) Edited By: Dr.N Mohanan,  Rajpal and Son’s,New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. A Hand Book of Translation Studies         By: Das Bijay Kumar.               

2. Saral Subodh Hindi Vyakaran,                 By: Motilal Chaturvedi. Vinod pustak mandir, Agra-2

3. Anuvad Evam Sanchar –                         Dr Pooranchand Tantan, Rajpal and Son’s, Kashmiri

4. Anuvad Vignan                                       By: Bholanath Tiwar

5. Anuvad Kala                                           By: N.E Vishwanath Iyer.

                                                                 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-Editing of Hindi article in Hindi Wikipedia )-20 marks

CIA-2(Mid semester examination)-50 marks

CIA-3(Digital learning-article creation in Hindi Wikipedia)-20 marks

End sem examination-50 marks

KAN121 - KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is taught in the  I Semester for BA/B.Sc. students. The selected Poems (Vachanas & Keerthanas ) from Medieval Literature  & Modern Kannada ( Navodaya)  literature are prescribed.  Texts will help students to understand the writings of  Poets as well as  story writers. Short stories of Sara Abubakar, Ravindranath Tagore, and K.P. Poornachandra Tejaswi  & Folk tales are prescribed. The syllabus will extend the concerns of family, family relationship, social justice and marginalization. Students should be able to comprehend and respond with grammatical accuracy to spoken and written Kannada as well as to demonstrate cultural awareness.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: to understand the values in Medieval Kannada Literature.

CO2: to appreciate the aesthetic aspects of music in Keerthana

CO3 : to understand the art of developing short stories

CO4: to imbibe the cultural aspects in Modern Kannada Stories

CO5 : improves reading, writing and speaking skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Kannada Sahitya Samakshama
 

1.      Vachanagalu

(a) Devaradasimayya

(b) Basavanna

(c) Allamaprabhu

(d) Akkamahadvi

(e) Gajesha Masaniyya

(f) Aydakki Lakkamma

2.      Keerthanegalu

(a)    Purandaradasa

(b)   Kanakadasa

3.      B.M.Srikantiah- Kariheggadeya Magalu 

4.      Mumbai Jataka- G.S. Shivarudrappa

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

1.      Basavannanavara vachanagalu: L. Basavarjaju
2.      Akkana vachanagalu: L. Basavarajau
3.      Allamana Vachanagalu; L . Basavaraju
4.      Purandara Sahitya Darshana: (Volume 1-2-3-4) S.K. Ramachandra Rao
5.      Kanaka Sahitya Darshana-. D. Javaregowda
6.      Kannada Sanna Kathegala Olavu- Giraddi Govindaraja

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      A comparative study of Sarana and Dasa literature, P. S Srinivasa,University of Madras (1981)

2.      Sharanara Anubhava Sahitya- H. Thipperudraswamy

3.      Vachana Kammata: (Ed)  K. Marulasiddappa and K. R. Nagaraj

4.      Basavanna: M. Chidananda Murthy

5.      Kanaka Kirana: Ka.Ta. Chikkanna

6.      Kannada Sanna Kathegalu: G.H. Nayak

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Wikipedia - Knowledge of regional language - Typing skills (20 Marks) 

CIA-2 Mid Semester Exams (50 Marks)

CIA-3 Texting Self introduction in Sand box  (20 Marks) 

End Semester Exams ( 50 Marks) 

PSY111 - ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This course has been conceptualized keeping in mind the professional and personal skill set that undergraduate students need to be equipped with for academic excellence. This section will orient the student towards effective studying strategies, academic writing skills, time management and planning methods. The skills will be developed via classroom individual and group activities and discussions. It will familiarize the students with the APA style of writing, referencing as well as reviewing academic texts. This course will help the learner to gain familiarity with efficient methods of managing academic challenges, improve their study method as well as gain better awareness and understanding regarding themselves. By working with both personal and academic skills, the objective of this coursework is to ensure better adaptability and functioning in the academic and social world. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Develop effective notes making methods

CO2: Read and review academic texts

CO3: Demonstrate better study strategies

CO4: Demonstrate skills of APA writing and referencing style

CO5: Create a better time management skills and deal with procrastination

CO6: Enhance presentation skill

Text Books And Reference Books:
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 Wikipedia - Knowledge of regional language - Typing skills (20 Marks) 

CIA-2 Mid Semester Exams (50 Marks)

CIA-3 Texting Self introduction in Sand box  (20 Marks) 

End Semester Exams ( 50 Marks) 

PSY131 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the study of basic psychological processes offered to the first-semester undergraduate students of psychology. It is an introductory paper that gives an understanding of the field of psychology, scope, and multiple perspectives and disciplines that provide a holistic picture of human behaviour. Students will learn the key concepts, classic examples, and modern and practical applications of fundamental psychological theories, methods, and tools. Emphasis is on the basic psychological processes of personality, learning, consciousness, motivation and emotion. This course allows them to learn the basics and demonstrate the skills that a student needs to move on to the more specific and in-depth psychology courses that follow. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Explain fundamental concepts, principles, theoretical perspectives, and arguments from across a range of psychology content domains like learning, personality, motivation and emotion to various situations and contexts.

CO2: Critically evaluate the different schools of thought in psychology

CO3: Define the basic biological process that influences behavior

CO4: Analyze methods of scientific inquiry, evidence-based thinking, and critical thinking skills to psychological phenomena and examples of psychological science

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
History and Schools of Thought
 

In this unit, we will examine the history of Western psychological theorizing from its beginnings in ancient Greece, through to the schools and perspectives of psychology including Structuralism, Functionalism, Psychodynamic, Biological, Behavioristic, Gestalt, Cognitive, Cross-cultural, Humanistic and Evolutionary. The aim is both to build a familiarity with psychology’s intellectual origins and to foster an awareness of its many false steps, dead-ends, and alternative pathways to gain a better appreciation of the social, cultural, and, above all, psychological influences on the theorizing of psychologists. Students will be able to define psychology and understand what psychologists do and identify the major fields of study and theoretical perspectives within psychology and know their similarities and differences. In the end, students will be ale to gain a better appreciation of why contemporary psychology takes the shape it does, describe the evolution of psychology and the major pioneers in the field, identify the various approaches, fields, and subfields of psychology along with their major concepts and important figures and describe the value of psychology and possible careers paths for those who study psychology

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

King, L. A. (2010). Experience Psychology. McGraw-Hill.

Gazzaniga, Heatherton, Halpern (2015). Psychological Science, 5th Edition, Norton.

Feldman.S.R.(2009).Essentials of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) Tata Mc Graw Hill.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA       CIA (Continuous Internal Assessment)-Total Marks- 50 

CIA-1: Activity-based Individual Assignment- 10 Marks 
CIA-2: Mid sem Exam-Case/Scenario-based Question- 25 Marks; Department level 
CIA-3: Individual Assignment- 10 Marks 
Attendance- 5 Marks 

ESE Pattern      ESE (End Semester Examination) Total Marks- 50 , 02 HOURS

Question paper pattern
Section A- (Short Answers) 02 marks x5Qs =10 Marks
Section B- (Essay Type) 10 marks x 3Qs = 30 Marks
Section C-(Compulsory: Case Study) 10 marks x 1Q =10 Marks

SAN121 - SANSKRIT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Janakiharana of Kumaradasa is the first Sanskrit mahakavya, so far as the extant literature goes, to deal solely with the whole of the Ramayana story. Its further interest is that it was produced in Ceylon, showing thereby the wider world over which Sanskrit had its sway. After manuscripts of the full text of the poem in twenty cantos had to come to light in South India, what is now presented was the first systematc and critical study to be undertaken to the author and the text and its position vis-a-vis other Mahakavyas. In addition to the above study and the critical edition of the cantos which were at that time unpublished the examination of the large number of extra-verses found in some MSS of the text and showing them as interpolations.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To understand the theme of epics

CO2: To develop new perspectives..

CO3: To appreciate the styles and thoughts of individual poets.

CO4: To focus on the poetical, artistic, cultural and historical aspects of the poetic works.

CO5: To enhance translation and interpretation skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:35
Janaki Haranam
 

Selected shlokas 1-60 shlokas

Janakiharana of Kumaradasa is the first Sanskrit mahakavya, so far as the extant literature goes, to deal solely with the whole of the Ramayana story. Its further interest is that it was produced in Ceylon, showing thereby the wider world over which Sanskrit had its sway. After manuscripts of the full text of the poem in twenty cantos had to come to light in South India, what is now presented was the first systematc and critical study to be undertaken to the author and the text and its position vis-a-vis other Mahakavyas. In addition to the above study and the critical edition of the cantos which were at that time unpublished the examination of the large number of extra-verses found in some MSS of the text and showing them as interpolations.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books for References: -

1)      Janakiharanam of Kumaradasa edited by  C K Swaminathan

2)      Janakiharanam edited by G.R. Nandargikar

3)      Sanskrit Grammar Translation from English to Sanskrit by M.R. Kale

Sanskrit Grammar Kannada version by Satish Hegde.                                   

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ramayana of Valmiki

Champu Ramayana of Bhoja 

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

CIA 1 Wikipedia assignments

 

CIA 2 Mid semester examinations

 

CIA 3 Wikipedia assignments

 

SOC131 - FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: 

The two papers offered during the first and the second semesters of the BA program will introduce students to Sociology as a social science distinct in its approach. It will also encourage the students to inculcate the Sociological perspective even as they are introduced to the subject matter and the methods of study adopted by the discipline. During the first semester, students will be introduced to the origins of Sociology, its founding fathers and the theoretical perspectives.

Course Objectives: 

  • To develop sociological imagination that will help students to rethink how social systems operate through individuals
  • To gain a comprehensive understanding of some of the major topics studied by sociologists

Learning Outcome

CO1: Define and use a range of key sociological concepts

CO2: Demonstrate an understanding of the emergence of the academic discipline of sociology

CO3: Apply sociological perspectives to the social world around them

CO4: Identify and differentiate between major theoretical perspectives and micro perspectives

CO5: Critique the nature of social institutions that shape social structure

UNIT-1
Teaching Hours:10
Sociology as a discipline
 
  1. Sociology: the discipline and its emergence
  2. Sociological Imagination (C W Mills) perspective
  3. Theoretical orientations
    1. Structural Functionalist perspective
    2. Conflict perspective
    3. Micro perspectives 
Text Books And Reference Books:

Berger, P. L. (2007). Invitation to sociology. United States: Academic Internet.

Bottomore, T. B. (1969). Sociology. London: Allen & Unwin.

Fulcher, J. & J Scott. (2007). Sociology. (3rd ed.). OUP.

Haralambos, M. & R.M.Heald. (2006). Sociology: Themes and Perspective. London: Harper Collins.

Henslin, J. (2009). Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach. (10thed.).USA: Pearson. 

Jayaram, N. (1988). Introductory Sociology. Madras: MacMillan.

Macionis, J.  (1996). Sociology. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Mills, C. W. (2000). Sociological Imagination. Oxford University Press.

Miner, H. (1956). Body ritual among the Nacirema. American Anthropologist, 1956, 58(3), 503-507.

Ritzer, G. (2011). Sociological Theory. McGraw Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bauman, Z. (1990). Thinking Sociologically. London: Blackwell.

Nisbet, R. (1967). The Sociological Tradition. London: Heinemann.

Williams, R. (1976). Key words. London: Fontana Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

·         Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 marks. The distribution is as follows:

§  CIA I is a 10 marks assignment and involves the adoption of any one or two of the following methods: written Assignment, Book/Article review, group presentations, symposium, group task, Individual seminars, Quiz, and class test.

§  CIA II is the 2 hour long 25 mark Mid semester Examination (50 marks reduced to 25 mark weightage) conducted during August/January 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: Attempt any 3 questions out of the 5/6 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

Section C: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 15 marks

§  CIA III carries 10 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. 

§  Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

·  End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long exam for a weightage of 50 marks

                      The pattern for the exam is given below:

Section A: Attempt any 6 questions out of the 9 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 4 questions out of the 6 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

                         Section C: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 15 marks

TAM121 - TAMIL (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Poems of Bharatiyar and Bharatidasan and poems by women poets with feminine sensibilities  will initiate the students into the modern period with all its complexities. The short stories by Ambai offers a matured vision of life through a varied characters and situatins. A new concept, Cultural Studies, will take the students beyond prescribed syllabus to include music, theatre, painting and films out of whcih the art form of music is taken up for the first semester.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To make the students experience the impact made by Bharathiyar and Bharathidasan during the 20th century and to bring them to the realities of 21st century.

CO2: They will also learn, on their own, about the nuances of music and a unique aesthetic experience it offers

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Modern Poetry- Bharathiyar
 

1. Kannan yen sevagan

2. Kannan yen kozhandhai

3. Kannan yen vilayatu pillai

4. Kannan yen kadhalan

5. Kannan yen kadhali

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

 

Malliga, R et al (ed).Thamilppathirattu I.Bangalore: Prasaranga,2011

     ‘Oru Karuppuchilanthiyudan Or Iravu’ by Ambai,

 

      published by Kalachuvadu Publications, Nagercoil, 2014

 

 

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Varadarajan, Mu.  Thamil Ilakkia Varalaru . New Delhi:Sahitya Akademi, 2008

 Sivathambi, Ka.Thamil Sirukathaiyin Thorramum Valarchiyum.Coimbatore: NCBH, 2009

 Ragunathan,C.Bharathi: Kalamum Karuthum, Chennai:NCBH, 1971

 

Ramakrishnan S 100 Sirantha Sirukathaigal, Chennai: Discovery Books, 2013

 

Evaluation Pattern

With a total of 100 marks, 50 marks will come from Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) and the remaining 50 marks will come from end semester exanination. While the end semester examination will be fully theory based the CIA will consist of  assignments, theatre production, book review and other activities

AEN221 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The second semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Srilanka. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

 

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

 

Learning Outcome

CO1 CO 2: iv) Understand the cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities of India v) it will be able to be analytical and critical of the pluralistic society they live in through the activities and assignments conducted vi) be aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Jayanta Mahapatra    “Grandfather”

 

2.      Meena Alexander    “Rites of Sense”

 

3.      K.Satchidanandan      “Cactus”

 

4.      Jean Arasanayagam   “Nallur”

Text Books And Reference Books:

The textbook "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Online references for Comprehension Questions in the textbook

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.


Question Paper Pattern        

Mid Semester Exam: 2 Hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 5 x 5 = 25

Section B: 5 x 15= 75

Total                   100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENG221 - ENGLISH - II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information

·         To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes

·         To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning

·         To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning

·         To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions

·         To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

CO2: Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO3: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO4: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
food
 

1.  Long text:    Witches’ Loaves

O Henry

2.   Short text:  Portion size is the trick!!!

By Ranjani Raman

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
language
 

Presentation skills

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

teacher manual and worksheets that teachers would provide. Listening skills worksheets.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1- 20

MSE-50

CIA3- 20

ESE- 50 online and 50 written

EST231 - BRITISH LITERATURE: LATE VICTORIAN TO THE PRESENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course will build on the previous course and continue the objectives of the previous course. The completion of this course should provide sufficientground to introduce literary theory in their fourth semester and postcolonial studies in the later semesters.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To introduce  students to the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts
  • To help students understand texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes
  • To enable students to identify different forms, genres and subgenres in literature
  • To sensitize students to human values through an exposure to socio-historical concerns of subjectivity, identity, community and nationhood.
  • To sharpen critical appreciation and analytical writing skills through an introduction to models of literary criticism

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to discern the socio-political, religious, cultural, and linguistic aspects of the UK through English literary texts

CO2: Students will be able to analyse and critique texts as products of a historical, political and cultural processes

CO3: Students will be able to identify different forms, genres and subgenres in literature

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Middle, Late Victorian Age and After
 

Darwin and the publication of Origin of Species, Victorian morality, utilitarianism, working class struggles, realism, naturalism, neorealism, Marxism 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Alfred Lord Tennyson: “Ulysses”

Robert Browning: “Porphyria’s Lover”

Gerald Manley Hopkins: “TheWindhover”

Charles Dickens: Great Expectations/David Copperfield/Tale of Two Cities

Bernard Shaw: Pygmalion

W B Yeats: “Easter 1916”

T.S. Eliot: “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”

James Joyce: “The Dead”

Katherine Mansfield: “A Cup of Tea”

 Harold Pinter: The Birthday Party

Adrien Mitchell: “The Question”

Ted Hughes: “Hawk Roosting”

Benjamin Zephaniah: “Dis Poetry”

Neil Gaiman: Coraline

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abrams, M.H. A Glossary of Literary Terms. 8th Ed. New York: Wardworth, 2005. Print.

Corcoran, Neil. The Cambridge Companion to Twentieth-CenturyEnglish Poetry. Cambridge: CUP, 2007. Print

Davis, Alex, and Lee M Jenkins. The Cambridge Companion to Modernist Poetry. Cambridge: CUP, 2007. Print

Ferguson, Margaret, Mary Jo Salter and Jon Stallworthy. Eds. The Norton Anthology of Poetry. 4th Ed. New York: WW Norton, 1996. Print

Gupta, Ambika Sen. Selected College Poems. Rpt. Hyderabad: Orient Longman,1999. Print

The Cambridge Companion to Narrative. Cambridge: CUP, 2007.Print.

John, Eileen, and Dominic McIver Lopes. Philosophy of Literature: Contemporary and Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004. Print

Kaplan, Fred, and Monod, Sylvere. Hard Times. New York: WW Norton, 2002. Print

Sampson, George. The Concise Cambridge History of English Literature, 3rd Ed. Cambridge: CUP, 2005. Print

 

 Ramarao, Vimala,. Ed. Explorations. Vol II. Bangalore: Prasaranga, Bangalore. Print

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

 

1. A class test / presentation / exhibition/ performance based on the texts prescribed

 

CIA III

 

       1. A moodle test on the play / short stories/ age

 

These are a few suggested CIAs. However, during the course of teaching, there could be other suggestions, and CIAs could be slightly modified based on class dynamics and calibre of students.

 

Selected Texts chosen to be taught may be revised / used as extended reading which may be tested in CIA 1, 2 or 3.

 

Mid Semester Examination CIA II: 2 hrs

 

Section A: Short Notes – 5x3 marks= 15 (5 questions out of 7)

Section B: Essay Questions – 2x10 marks = 20 (2 questions out of 3)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 1x15 marks = 15 (1 question out of 2)

 

Total: 50 Marks

 

End Semester Examination Pattern

 

Section A: Short Notes – 10x3 marks = 30 (10 questions out of12)

Section B: Essay Questions – 4x10 marks = 40 (4 questions out of 6)

Section C: Long Essay Questions – 2x15 marks = 30 (2 questions out of 4)

 

Total: 100 Marks

 

Notes:

 

  1. For all texts Norton Editions are to be treated as the official prescribed editions.
  2. For critical material The Cambridge Companion Series of CUP, Case Book Series of Macmillan and Palgrave, and Norton series of WW Norton are officially prescribed.

FRN221 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as a second language in the UG program. The method Génération A1 consists of a student's book and an activity book, both included in the digital manual. It consists of 6 units preceded by an initial section of 'Welcome'. The structure of each unit marks a real learning journey.

 

Course Objectives

·       To develop linguistic competencies and sharpen oral and written communicative skills

·       To familiarize learners to certain aspects of francophone civilization.

·       To enable learners to engage in simple everyday situations

Learning Outcome

CO1: To familiarize students with French words and pronunciation.

CO 2: To enable students in reading and writing skills

CO 3: To enhance the listening and speaking skills.

CO 4: To make them proficient in the language skills.

CO 5: To enable the communication skills in french.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Culture: A country of vacation
 

Dossier 4- Culture: A country of vacation

 

Lesson 1: Hobbies

Lexicon – Hobbies, daily activities, matter

Grammar – Interrogative adjectives, ordinal numbers, time, direct object personal pronouns

Speech acts – Speaking about tastes and preferences

 

   
 

Lesson 2: The routine

Lexicon – Weather and time, frequency

Grammar – Pronominal verbs, first group verbs, verb ‘to take’

Speech acts – Describing one’s day

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Cocton, Marie-Noelle. Génération A1. Paris : Didier, 2016 

2.  De Lafontaine, Jean. Les Fables de la Fontaine. Paris, 1668

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     French websites like Bonjour de France, Fluent U French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN221 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 Course Description:

 

 

The text book ”Samakaleen Kahaniyam is a contemporary socio-political issues based story collection edited by Dr.Vanaja  Published by Rajpal and sons, New Delhi.  In this semester four visual texts/film appreciation and famous four film directors of India from different languages have been incorporated along with conversation writing and practices to improve the spoken skills of the students.

 

 

 

Course Objectives:

 

Students are exposed to the world of Hindi fiction particularly short stories. Film appreciation helps them to improve their writing and analytical skills and know more about the thematic and technical aspects of Cinema.  The module ‘Film Directors’ will inspire students to achieve professionally and personally.  Conversation practice enable them to use the correct form of language by which spoken communication skill will be enhanced.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1 : Improve the analytical skills through critical analysis of the stories.

CO2 : Understand the thematic and technical aspects of Hindi movies through the visual text.

CO3: Improve the basic research skills while doing the research article creation for CIAs.

CO4: Improve the spoken skills by conversation practices.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Samakaleen Kahaniyam
 

The text book “  Samakaleen Kahaniyam    ” is a story collection edited by Dr. Vanaja from contemporary writers of Hindi Literature.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Story Collection‘Samakaleen kahaniyam’ (Full Text) Edited By: Dr. Vanaja Published By: Rajpal and Sons Kashmiri Gate, New Delhi-6.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Sugam Hindi Vyakaran                By: VamshidharDharmpalShastriShiksha

Bharathi, New Delhi.

2. SaralSubodh Hindi Vyakaran,       By:MotilalChaturvedi. Vinod pustak

mandir , Agra-23. Cinema AurSamskritiMazoomRizaRahi

3.Bolchalki Hindi aursancharBy:Dr.MadhuDhavan.Vaniprakasan,New Delhi.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-Wikipedia)

CIA-2(Midsemester examination)

CIA-3(Digital learning-Wikipedia)

End semester examination

KAN221 - KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: The prescribed play AMRAPALI  by Dr. Prabhushankar, and the selection of short stories, Essays and Academic science writings are the texts for Second semester Kannada The Legend of Amrapali originated in the Buddhist Jataka Tales some 1500 years ago. Amrapali is a great character in the Indian history. She was known as a dancer and also a philosophical thoughts oriented woman. A key goal of this course will be to familiarize students with the basic techniques of analysing written drama and its stages performances. The selected prose will extend the concerns of Environment,  Folk beliefs and social justice.

Course Objectives: Students will be able to read drama scripts in Kannada and understand main ideas and details in different kinds of dramatic scripts.  The Play improves listening comprehension of different types of spoken texts-for main ideas, details and speakers’ attitude and emotions. It helps in develop and use language learning strategies for all language skills.

Learning Outcome

CO1 : to analyze and interpret texts and performances both in writing and orally

CO 1: to demonstrate the knowledge of theatre

CO2: to improve creative writing skills

CO3 : to practice collaborative skills in various theatrical contexts

CO5 : to analyze a variety of short stories/fiction

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Text-1 AMRAPALI- DR. S. PRABHUSHANKARA
 

Act-1 ( Scene-1 ) Pages 07-13

Act-1 ( Scene-2 ) Pages 13-19

Act-1 ( Scene-3 ) Pages 19-28

Act-1 ( Scene-4 ) Pages 20-42

Act-2 ( Scene-1 ) Pages 42-50

Act-2 ( Scene-2 ) Pages 50-58

Act-2 ( Scene-2 ) Pages 59-65

Act-2 ( Scene-2 ) Pages 66-70

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Adhunika Kannada Nataka- K. Marulasiddappa

2. Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Rum Shri Mugali

3. What Buddha Taught- Walpola Sri Rahula 

4. Buddha- Mounada Sakara Murthy- Sri Sri Ravishankar 

5. Life of Buddha- Kashinath Potdar 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. The story of Buddha The Enlightened one- Tripati Nainwal 

2. Desheeya Chinthana- Chandrashekara Kambara

3. Yugadharma hagu Sahitya Darshana- Keerthinatha Kurthukoti

Evaluation Pattern
 

 

CIA-1  Wikipedia - 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Wikipedia - 20 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

Attendance: 05 Marks 

PSY211 - LIFE SKILL EDUCATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course description: This paper offered to undergraduate students as an open elective course. Basically the course following WHO life skills model. Where life skills education is well developed and practised, it enhances the well-being of young minds and promotes a positive outlook and healthy behaviour. The life skills model facilitate the overall development of the individual and this course will help the learner to translate knowledge, attitude, skills, and values into action; Behave responsibly and this leads to healthy living; Develop Positive Attitude towards themselves and others; Develop full potential; Promote the state of mental well-being as this motivates them and others; Promote risk-free behaviour; Communicate effectively; Develop negotiation skills; Improve self-perception through building self-confidence, self-esteem and self- worth.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand and appreciate the importance of Life Skill Education

CO2: Explain the assumptions of Life Skill Education

CO3: Apply life skills in their day to day life situations

Text Books And Reference Books:
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
Evaluation Pattern
 

 

CIA-1  Wikipedia - 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Wikipedia - 20 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

Attendance: 05 Marks 

PSY231 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES - II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is conceptualised to help students understand basic cognitive processes as they affect the individual. The course introduces students about different cognitive concepts such as perception, memory, attention, intelligence, language and thought in the various manifestations of the study of mind and behaviour. It introduces the basic framework on how psychologists scientifically study and understand the cognitive processes through various quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry. The course also takes through the various applications on how the human mind works in different situations and in our everyday life such as the applications of human memory in the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and modern machines. Students will have the opportunity to examine these concepts from multiple psychological perspectives and to reflect upon the applicability of these concepts. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Define the basic cognitive process that influences behaviour

CO2: Explain how the influence of behaviour, cognition, and the environment affects behaviour.

CO3: Compare and contrast various models, theories and methods in understanding cognitive processes.

CO4: Apply these concepts to explain everyday life events and situation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Sensation and Perception
 

An introduction to the study of the human senses and perceptual processes. We will trace what happens to the physical stimulus as our sensory systems analyze it to produce complicated perceptions of the world around us. We will explore the fact that many complex perceptual phenomena draw upon explanations at the physiological, psychological, and cognitive levels. Topics on sensory perception in non-human animals may also be covered. Data gathered from psychophysical research and studies of both humans, and other animals will be discussed. The unit will review the mechanisms and principles of operation of vision, hearing, touch, taste and smell; Differentiate between sensation and perception; Explain the process of vision and how people see colour and depth; Explain the basics of hearing, taste, smell, touch, pain, and the vestibular sense; Define perception and give examples of gestalt principles and multimodal perception

 Laboratory Demonstration: Illusion experiment, Depth Perception, Colour Blindness test, Dexterity test 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Weiten, W. (2014). Psychology: Themes and Variations (Briefer Version, 9th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

King, L. A. (2010). Experience Psychology. McGraw-Hill.

Gazzaniga, Heatherton, Halpern (2015). Psychological Science, 5th Edition, Norton.

Feldman.S.R.(2009).Essentials of understanding psychology ( 7th Ed.) Tata Mc Graw Hill.

Baron, R.A and Misra, G. (2014). Psychology (Indian Subcontinent Edition).Pearson Education Ltd.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA       CIA (Continuous Internal Assessment)-Total Marks- 50 

CIA-1: Activity-based Individual Assignment- 10 Marks 
CIA-2: Mid sem Exam-Case/Scenario-based Question- 25 Marks; Department level 
CIA-3: Individual Assignment- 10 Marks 
Attendance- 5 Marks 

ESE Pattern      ESE (End Semester Examination) Total Marks- 50 , 02 HOURS

Question paper pattern
Section A- (Short Answers) 02 marks x5Qs =10 Marks
Section B- (Essay Type) 10 marks x 3Qs = 30 Marks
Section C-(Compulsory: Case Study) 10 marks x 1Q =10 Marks

SAN221 - SANSKRIT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

1.     Jatakamala of  Aryashura is the text prescribed and approved in the B.O.S.  The selected chapters will be taught in the classroom.  And also the selected portion from the Grammar.  This book not only teaches the morals to the students but also to learn Sanskrit easily Students can make the sentences with simple words.   It also makes the student to think how the same topic is thought by different students in different situations their understanding is really intelligent.  The students can learn different qualities by studying this course. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To Specify the classification and characteristics of fables

CO2: To understand the text in detail with application.

CO3: To learn in depth the morals of the fables

CO4: To learn human behaviour.

CO5: To acquire a comprehension of compounding syllables.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:35
Jatakamala 1 vyaagree jaathakam and shibi jaathakam
 

1.      Jatakamala of  Aryashura is the text prescribed and approved in the B.O.S.  The selected chapters will be taught in the classroom.  And also the selected portion from the Grammar.  This book not only teaches the morals to the students but also to learn Sanskrit easily Students can make the sentences with simple words.   It also makes the student to think how the same topic is thought by different students in different situations their understanding is really intelligent.  The students can learn different qualities by studying this course. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Jatakamala of  Aryashura

2.      

3.      Sanskrit Grammar by M.R. Kale.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Samskruta sahithya parampare by Acharya Baladeva Upadyaya translated by Ramachandra shastri.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 Wikipedia assignments

CIA 2 Mid semester examinations

CIA 3 Wikipedia assignments

SOC231 - FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY - II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course introduces the students to the premise of social inequality and forms of stratification and social change. The students will be encouraged to use the sociological imagination that they have developed during the previous semester to comprehend these different aspects of their social reality. The students are also introduced to Conformity and Deviance, Social Demography, Urbanization and Social Change.

Course Objectives: 

  • To have an enhanced vision of the significance of sociological perspective and the difference it makes in our understanding of society
  • Identify and discuss specific areas of study within Sociology

Learning Outcome

CO1: Discuss how forms of social stratification like race, gender, caste, and class influence our lives

CO2: Apply the knowledge gained from social theories to analyse systems of social stratification

CO3: Analyse patterns of conformity and deviance

CO4: Describe the significance of the study of the population and analyse the demographic processes that impact society

CO5: Critically review different perspectives that help us understand social processes and social structures and the changes therein

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Social Stratification
 
  1. Basis of social stratification
  2. Social Mobility
  3. Forms of social stratification:
    1. Sex and gender
    2. Race and ethnicity
    3. Caste, Visual Text: India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart
    4. Class

       4. Intersectionality

4.    Intersectionality

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bottomore, T. B. (1969). Sociology. London: Allen & Unwin.

Bhende, A. & Kanitkar, T. (2000). Principles of Population Studies.(9th ed.) Mumbai: Himalaya Publishing House. 

Gupta, D. (2018). Social stratification. Oxford University Press. (selected essays)

Fulcher, J. & J Scott. (2007). Sociology. (3rded). OUP.

Haralambos, M. & R.M.Heald. (2006). Sociology: Themes and Perspective. London:

        Harper Collins.

Henslin, J. (2009). Sociology: A Down to Earth Approach.(10thed.). USA: Pearson.

Macionis, J. (2012). Sociology. Pearson Education.

 

Premi. (1983). Social Demography. Delhi: South Asia Books.

Visual Texts:

India Untouched: Stories of a People Apart (2007).

A Man Called "Bee": Studying the Yanomamo (1975).

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Nisbet, R. (1967). The Sociological Tradition. London: Heinemann.

Williams, R. (1976). Key words. London: Fontana Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

·         Continuous Internal Assessment or CIA constitutes a total of 50 marks. The distribution is as follows:

§  CIA I is a 10 marks assignment and involves the adoption of any one or two of the following methods: written Assignment, Book/Article review, group presentations, symposium, group task, Individual seminars, Quiz, and class test.

§  CIA II is the 2 hour long 25 mark Mid semester Examination (50 marks reduced to 25 mark weightage) conducted during August/January 

The pattern for the exam is as follows:

Section A: Attempt any 3 questions out of the 5/6 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

Section C: This section has 1 compulsory question that carries 15 marks

§  CIA III carries 10 marks and is based on an assignment that is set for the course. 

§  Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

·  End Semester Examination (ESE) is conducted at the end of the semester. This is a 3 hour long exam for a weightage of 50 marks

                      The pattern for the exam is given below:

Section A: Attempt any 6 questions out of the 9 options given. Each question carries 5 marks

Section B: Attempt any 4 questions out of the 6 options given. Each question carries 10 marks

                        Section C: Attempt any 2 questions out of the 3 options given. Each question carries 15 marks

 

TAM221 - TAMIL (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper has a few collections from the ‘Individual Poems’ of Avvaiyar and Kalamegam to show the students the ingenuity with the poets of the period mixing  intelligence with creativity. The unconventional and unorthodox views of life seen through theological eyes of Siddhas are included. It also introduces the power of oral tradition through a collection of interviews recorded and transcribed. These voices are from the marginalized communities which had no opportunity to voice out their pains and sorrows.. Students will be exposed to the art form of theatre through self experiece using internet resources like You Tube 

Learning Outcome

CO 1: Recall and categorize the concepts of literature.

CO 2: Understand the true essence of the texts, and inculcate them in their daily lives.

CO 3: Recognize and apply the moral values and ethics in their learning.

CO 4: Comprehend the concepts in literature and appreciate the literary text.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Thanni padalgal
 

1.Avvaiyar amudha muzhigal

2. Kaala mega pulavar

3. Siladai

Text Books And Reference Books:

Malliga, R et al (ed).Thamilppathirattu.Vol.I Bangalore: Prasaranga,2011

 'Vai mozhi varalaru’ Ed: Vi.Arasu and Ki. ParthibhaRaja,Thannanaane Publications, Chennai, 2001

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Meenakshisundaram T P,  A History of Tamil Literature, Annamalainagar, Annamalai University, 1965

Varadarajan, Mu.  Thamil Illakkia Varalaru . New Delhi:Sahitya Akademi, 2008

Gopalakrishnan.S., Pathinen Siddhar Varalaru, Chennai: Mullai Pathippagam, 2012

Stephen,G (ed). Ayothidasar Sindhanaigal, Thirunelveli: St.Xavier’s College, 1999

Theodore, Baskaran, Thamil Cinema Or Arimugam. Chennai: Kilakku Pathippagam, 2012

Pavendan, Dhiravida Cinema, Chennai: Kayal Kavin Books, 2013

 



Evaluation Pattern

 

EXAMINATION AND ASSIGNMENTS: There is a continuous evaluation both at the formal and informal levels. The language skills and the ability to evaluate a text will be assessed

This paper will have a total of 50 marks shared equally by End Semester Exam (ESE) and Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) While the ESE is based on theory the CIA will assess the students' critical thinking, leadership qualities, language skills and creativity

 

 

 

AEN321 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course is taught in the second year for students from different streams, namely BA, BSc

 

and BCom. If the first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ

 

University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian voices in English and Indian

 

regional literatures in translation for the Additional English students of the first year, the

 

second year syllabus intends to take that project a little further and open up the engagement

 

of the students to texts from across the world. The syllabus - selection of texts will

 

concentrate on readings from South Asian, Latin American, Australian, Canadian, and Afro-

 

American. It will voice subaltern concerns of identity, gender, race, ethnicity and problems of

 

belongingness experienced by humanity all over the globe.

 

The syllabus will extend the concerns of nation and nationality and marginalization,

 

discussed within the Indian context to a more inclusive and wider global platform. We have

 

consciously kept out ‘mainstream’ writers and concentrated on the voices of the subalterns

 

from across the world. There is an implicit recognition in this project that though the aspects

 

of marginalization and the problems facing subalterns are present across cultures and

 

nations, the experiences, expressions and reflections are specific to each race and culture.

 

The course will address these nuances and specificities and enable our students to become

 

more aware and sensitive to life and reality around them. This will equip the students, who

 

are global citizens, to understand not just the Indian scenario, but also situate themselves

 

within the wider global contexts and understand the spaces they will move into and negotiate

 

in their future.

 

There is a prescribed text book Blends: Voices from Margins for the second year students,

 

compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

Course Objectives

 

The course objectives are

 

 to enable students to look at different cultures through Literature

 

 to help students develop an understanding of subaltern realities and identity politics

 

 to inculcate literary sensibility/taste among students across disciplines

 

 to improve language skills –speaking, reading, writing and listening

 

 to equip the students with tools for developing lateral thinking

 

 to equip students with critical reading and thinking habits

 

 to reiterate the study skills and communication skills they developed in the previous

 

year and extend it.

Learning Outcome

CO1 : more culturally, ethically, socially and politically aware citizens of the world..

CO2: it will enable students to become aware of the nuances of cultures, ethnicities and other diversity around them and become sensitive towards them.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Children?s Novel
 

TetsukoKuroyanagi: Tottochan: The Little Girl at the Window12

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blends Book II

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Oxford Encyclopeadia on Latin American History

Diary of Anne Frank

Elie Wiesel "Night"

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: A written test for 20 marks. It can be an Open Book test, a classroom assignment, an

 

objective or descriptive test pertaining to the texts and ideas discussed in class.

 

CIA2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 works

 

CIA 3: This is to be a creative test/ project in small groups by students. They may do

 

Collages, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes, presentations, debates,

 

charts or any other creative test for 20 marks. This test should allow the students to explore

 

their creativity and engage with the real world around them and marks can be allotted to

 

students depending on how much they are able to link the ideas and discussions in the texts

 

to the world around them.

 

Question Paper Pattern

 

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

Section A: 4x5= 20

 

Section B: 2x15=30

 

Total 50

 

End Semester Exam: 3 hrs

 

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

 

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

 

Total 50

ENG321 - ENGLISH-III (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description

English is offered as a course for all the students in BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA F&A classes in the third and fourth semesters. The aim is to strengthen the communication skills, and particularly study skills of the learners further, through adequate practice and exposure to good examples of writing, thought, ideas and human values. In addition, they will be trained in study skills through tasks in academic genres such as message, letter, essay, data interpretation etc. It aims to not only equip learners with skills but also sensitize them towards issues that concern human life in today’s globalised context. The course content is selected to meet the requirements of the departmental goal of “empowering the individual to read oneself, the social context and the imagined”; institutional goal of ensuring “holistic development”; and the national goal of creating competent and valuable citizens. The primary objective of this course is to help learners develop appropriate employability skills and demonstrate suitable conduct with regards to communication skills. The units are organised in order to help the learners understand the academic and workplace demands and learn by practice.

 

Course Objectives     

 

 

·       To enable learners to develop reading comprehension for various purposes

 

·       To enable learners to develop writing skills for academic and professional needs

 

·       To enable learners to develop the ability to think critically and express logically

 

·       To enable learner to communicate in a socially and ethically acceptable manner

 

·       To enable learners, to read, write and speak with clarity, precision and accuracy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify deviant use of English both in written and spoken. Recognise the errors of usage and correct them

CO2: Recognise their own ability to improve their own competence in using the language. Understand and appreciate English spoken by people from different regions

CO3: Use language for speaking with confidence in an intelligible and acceptable manner. Understand the importance of reading for life

CO4: Develop an interest in reading Read independently unfamiliar texts with comprehension. Read longer texts, compare and evaluate them

CO5: ummarise texts and present orally or in writing ยท Understand the importance of writing in academic life Write simple sentences without committing errors of spelling and grammar. Plan a piece of writing using drafting techniques

CO6: Ability to communicate effectively in speech and in writing. Ability to use better vocabulary to communicate effectively

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to university grammar
 

 

Subject verb agreement

 

Tenses

 

Preposition

 

Voices

 

Clauses

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

NIL

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

ENGlogue -2

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test/ written or oral tasks for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester portfolio submission for 50 marks.

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any creative assignments.

 

 

Question Paper Pattern    

    

Mid Semester: Portfolio submission – 50 marks

 

Mid semester evaluation- portfolio submission (portfolios of classes will be exchanged and evaluated) 

 

End- semester 50 marks exam / portfolio

 

 

 

 

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

5x10=50

 

Total                   50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EST331 - AMERICAN LITERATURES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

  • To introduce the students to the socio-political, religious and cultural aspects of America through literary texts
  • To enable students to  read texts as products of  historical, political and cultural context
  • To provide insights into different styles of writing over different centuries
  • To encourage clear understanding of different genres and prosody/forms/literary devices.
  • To enable learners to give their perspective on the texts prescribed
  • To brainstorm learners to use their knowledge of History, Psychology, Sociology, etc to read literary works

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify different influences on American literature & Provide an account of European colonization of American

CO2: Demonstrate a familiarity with native America literature

CO3: Use American history to analyze different pieces of American literature

CO4: Trace the development of American literature through different eras

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Beginnings to 1700
 

Description: This unit will introduce American History and literature. An outline of important events would be briefed.

  • The Navajo Creation Story
  • John Smith- The New Land
  • Anne Bradstreet – In Honour of that Highness
Text Books And Reference Books:

Text compiled for internal circulation

Essential Reading

  1. Roger Williams: from A Key into the Language of America
  2. Anne Bradstreet: from Contemplations
  3. Context: Cultures in Contact: Voices from Anglo-American’s “New” World (17C)]
  4. Sarah Kemble Knight (1666-1727)
  5. The journal of Madame Knight
  6. Context: Tradition and Change in Anglo-America
  7. Philip Freneau (1752-1832)
  8. The Indian Student or Force of Nature
  9. Washington Irving (1783-1859)
  10. From A History of New York
  11. James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851)
  12. From The Last of the Mohicans
  13. William Apess (1798-?)
  14. An Indian’s Looking-Glass for the White Man
  15. Context: Indian Voices
  16. Herman Melville (1819-1891)
  17. TheParadise of Bachelors and The Tartarus of Maids
  18. Sarah Margaret Fuller (1810-1850)
  19. From Woman in the Nineteenth Century
  20. From American Literature; Its position in the present time, and prospects for the future
  21. Sojourner Truth (1797
  22. Address to the first Annual Meeting of the American Equal Rights Association
  23. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911)
  24. The colored people in America
  25. Context: Literature and the “Woman Question”
  26. Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo (1808-1890)
  27. An account of the Gold Rush
  28. Context: Voices from the Southwest
  29. Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney (1791-1865)
  30. The suttee
  31. Sherwood Anderson
  32. From Winesburg, Ohio
  33. John Dos Passos
  34. From U.S.A
  35. Elizabeth Bishop
  36. In the waiting room
  37. Tennessee Williams
  38. Portrait of a Madonna
  39. Sylvia Plath
  40. Lady Lazarus
  41. Robert Lowell
  42. Skunk hour
  43. Alice Walker
  44. The child who favoured daughter
  45. Adrienne Rich
  46. Upper Broadway
  47. Gary Snyder
  48. Sixth-month song in the foothills
  49. Vladimir Nabokov
  50. From Lolita
  51. Ralph Ellison
  52. From Invisible Man
  53. Thomas Pynchon
  54. Entropy
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1. Abel, Darrel. American Literature, Volume 1: Colonial and Early National Writing, (ed)
  2. Abel, Darrel. American Literature, Volume 2: Literature of the Atlantic Culture, (ed) Abel, Darrel.
  3. Recent American Literature to 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs Lenthiel H, Volume 3; Barron’s Educational Series
  4. Recent American Literature After 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs, Lenthiel H. Volume 4; Barron’s Educational Series
  5. Literary History of The United States:  (ed) Spiller, Thorp, Johnson, Canby, Ludwig, Third Edition: Revised; Amerind Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd.
  6. The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume 1, Second Edition; (ed) Lauter, Yarborough et al, Heath
  7. The Harper American Literature, Compact Edition; (ed) McQuade, Atwan et al, Harper and Row
Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

 

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Individual or group work

20+20

50

                

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam

 Module

Section A

10 marks

Section B

20 marks

Module I

1

1

Module II

1

 

Module III

1

 

Module IV

 

 

 End Semester Exam

 Module

Section A

15 marks

Section B

20 marks

 

Module I

1

 

 

Module II

1