Department of
MEDIA STUDIES






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Media Studies, Economics, Political Science)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECO331 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 5 5 100
BECO341A MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BECO341B ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BMST341 MEDIA AND HUMAN RIGHTS 4 4 100
BMST351 MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATION 5 5 100
BPOL331 INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS-I 5 5 100
BPOL341 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY 3 3 100
SDEN311 SKILL DEVELOPMENT 2 0 50
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECO431 INDIAN ECONOMY 4 4 100
BECO441 STATISTICS AND ECONOMETRIC METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 5 5 100
BEMP441A RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 4 4 100
BEMP441B RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 4 4 100
BEMP441C RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 4 4 100
BMST451 AUDIO-VISUAL PRODUCTION 5 5 100
BPOL431 INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS-II 5 5 100
BPOL441 POLICY ANALYSIS 4 4 100
SDEN411 KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS 2 0 50
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECO531 PUBLIC ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BECO541 LABOUR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BEMP581 INTERNSHIP 0 2 50
BMST531 MEDIA, GENDER AND SOCIETY 4 4 100
BMST541 MARKETING COMMUNICATION 4 4 100
BPOL531 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 4 100
BPOL541A WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT 4 4 100
BPOL541B CONCEPTS AND THEORIES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 4 4 100
SDEN511 CAREER ORIENTED SKILLS 2 0 50
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BECO631 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BECO641 FINANCIAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
BEMP681 DISSERTATION 2 4 100
BMST631 ADVERTISING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS 4 4 100
BMST641 FILM STUDIES 4 4 100
BPOL631 ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 4 100
BPOL641A COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS: SWITZERLAND, UK, USA AND CHINA 4 4 100
BPOL641B PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 4 4 100
SDEN611 SELF ENHANCEMENT SKILL 2 0 50

BECO331 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The course introduces the fundamental concepts, approaches and classic theories in areas of economics of growth as well as economic development. By exploring the diverse patterns of achieving economic development, the course gives insights on the existence of varied levels of economic progress across the nations. The course focuses on core issues like poverty and inequality by highlighting the discussions on the concept, measurement and extent of these problems.  In addition, the course throws light on the contemporary issues and hindrances in achieving economic development, thereby introducing the various nuances encircling the broader topic of economic development. 

Course Objectives
The course intends to

  • Give an understanding of the theoretical perceptions of economic growth and development together. 

  • Create awareness of the challenges in the developmental process and thus motivate the students towards the thinking of alternative solutions.

  • Analyse the evolving issues and nuances with respect to economic growth and development.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify and examine the role of theories of development economics in the number of existing development issues.

CO2: Summarize the interlinks between various development economic theories and approaches.

CO3: Categorize and find the nuances surrounding the issue of economic development.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction and Relevant Concepts
 

Concept of Economic growth and development; Measurement: Traditional Measures, the new economic view of development, Sen’s Capabilities Approach; Development and Happiness and other recent measures; Core values and objectives of development; Environmental sustainability and sustainable development: Concept and recent strategies; Common characteristics of developing nations and difference between low-income countries today and developed countries in earlier stages. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Four Classic Approaches to Growth and Development
 

Development as growth and linear stage theories: Rostow’s stages theory, Harrod-Domar Model and Romer’s model; Structural change models: Lewis model and Chenery’s patterns of growth; International dependence revolution: False-paradigm model; Neo-classical growth model: Solow’s growth model; Neo-classical counter-revolution: market fundamentalism; classic theories of development: reconciling the differences.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Contemporary Models of Development and Underdevelopment
 

Underdevelopment as Coordination failure; Multiple Equilibria: A Diagrammatic Approach; the Big Push theory; Problems in multiple equilibria.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Poverty, Inequality and Development
 

Concept of Poverty- absolute, relative and Poverty Line; Absolute poverty: Measurement, popular and recent measures, extent and magnitude; Concept of inequality and measurement, size distributions, Lorenz curves, Gini co-efficient and recent measures; Poverty inequality and social welfare: Economic growth and income inequality; Kuznets’ inverted Hypothesis; Impact of inequality on development.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Urbanization and Informal Sector
 

Causes and effects of urbanization; Migration and development: Harris -Todaro model of rural-urban migration; Policies for the urban informal sector; Women in the informal sector: The Microfinance revolution.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Planning for Development
 

Development planning: concepts and rationale; basics of development planning process; role of State versus market in planning for development; development roles of NGOs. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Todaro, M. P., & Smith, S. C. (2012). Economic Development (12th ed.). Washington, DC: George Washington University.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Acemoglu, D. & Robinson, J. (2006). Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Basu, K. (1997). Analytical Development Economics: The Less Developed Economy Revisited. Cambridge: MIT Press.
Dasgupta, P. (2007). Economics: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press.
Putnam, R. (1994). Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
Ray, D. (2011). Development Economics. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
Schultz, T. P., & Strauss, J. (2008). Handbook of Development Economics (eds.). (Vol. 4). Oxford: Elsevier.
Sen, A. (2000). Development as Freedom. New York: Oxford University Press.
Thirlwall, A. (2006). Growth & Development. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BECO341A - MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This paper aims to transmit the body of basic mathematics that enables the study of economic theory at the undergraduate level. The course aims at introducing the application of mathematical techniques to economic theory in general.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand basic skills in applied mathematics;
  • understand the mathematical techniques that are used in Economics

Learning Outcome

CO1: Examine the mathematical methods that are most widely used in economics.

CO2: Interpret the economic problems in a multivariable model and yield valuable insight about optimizing human behaviour.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction
 

Introduction to set theory: Cartesian Product; Relations and Functions: Meaning and Distinction, Functional notations: general, exact and specific forms; Explicit  and Implicit  forms; Inverse form; Types  of functions: Linear, quadratic, cubic, exponential and logarithmic functions; Their simple uses in Economics; Introduction to Homogeneous function: Cobb Douglas production function; Exponential functions as applied in interest compounding; Basic concepts and application of Graphs, Slopes and Intercept  in Economics.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Differential Calculus
 

Differential Calculus: Meaning, Simple derivative rules (One independent variable); Application of derivatives in Economics; Partial Derivatives (Two independent variables) Rules; Uses of partial derivatives in economics; Application of derivative in Economics, Calculation of different Marginal concepts and elasticities.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Optimization Techniques
 

Maxima and Minima of functions (one independent variable):  Simple applications from Micro Economics; Maxima and Minima of functions (two independent variables): Unconstrained and constrained models;  Applications of maxima and minima in Economics: Theory of consumption (numerical problems of utility maximization); Theory of production; production function, Producer’s equilibrium, Output, revenue and profit maximization and cost minimization problems under different market conditions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Matrices and Determinants
 

Matrices: Meaning; Types of matrices; Elementary operations on matrices; Inverse matrix; Methods of solving simultaneous equations using matrices; Determinants and their uses in solving simultaneous equations; Crammer's rule; Input Output Analysis; Application of matrices in optimizing economic functions; Hessian and Bordered Hessian.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Integral Calculus
 

Integral Calculus: Simple rules of integration; Infinite and definite integral; Calculation of TR and TC functions from their respective MR and MC. Consumer's surplus and Producer's surplus.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chiang, A.C. & Wainwright, K.  (2013). Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics. (4th ed.). McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited.
Sydsaeter, K. & Hammond, P. (2016).  Mathematics for Economic Analysis. New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Allen, R. G. D. (2014). Mathematical Analysis for Economists. New Delhi: Trinity Press.
Dowling, E.  T. (2012). Schaum’s Outlines - Introduction to Mathematical Economics. (3rd ed.).  New York: McGraw Hill.
Veerachamy, R. (2008). Quantitative Methods for Economists. (2nd ed.). New Delhi: New Age International (P) Limited.
Yamane, T. (2012). Mathematics for Economists- An Elementary Survey. (2nd ed.). United States: Literacy Licensing LLC.

Evaluation Pattern

 

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

BECO341B - ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To introduce the basic concepts and theories in environment and resource economics to enable students to better understand environmental problems and policy management. To enhance the analytical skills of the students and help apply economic principles in solving environmental problems. To expose students to the basic environmental valuation practices

  • To understand the key concepts and theories of environmental economics.

  • To understand environmental problems and policy management.

  • To evaluate the skills of the students in the application of the economic principles in solving environmental problems.

  • To understand the concepts of environmental valuation, methods and its applications.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Explain the major concepts and theories relevant to environmental economics.

CO2: Demonstrate knowledge of the major environmental issues and challenges.

CO3: Examine the role of the state through fiscal and policy interventions in addressing the issues of pollution.

CO4: Apply environmental valuation tools in addressing the issues related to environmental problems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Environmental Economics
 

Definition; Nature and scope; Environmental economics–resource economics-ecological economics; Economy–environment interaction; Private versus social costs; Externalities.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Environmental Resources and problems in India
 

Energy- renewable & non-renewable energy sources- access to Common Property Resources (CPR). Pollution; (i) Domestic- solid waste, health, sanitation and safe drinking water; (ii) Industry- air pollution, water pollution, soil pollution, noise pollution; (iii) Agricultural – soil erosion, deforestation and (iv) auto mobile pollution. Land degradation

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Environment and development
 

Environment and development tradeoff debate; Environmental Kuznet’s curve hypothesis; Sustainable development-indicators and rules; Various approaches to environmental accounting; Environmental education.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Environment and Society
 

Pollution and environment; Impact of population growth on environment; Poverty and environment; Urbanization and environment; People‘s participation and environmental movement.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Management and Policy
 

Fiscal tools; Pollution taxes – subsidies, pollution control boards – national and international environmental policies; Legislative measures of environmental protection in India; Climate change Conventions.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Environmental Valuation
 

Concept of total economic value; Willingness-to-pay versus willingness to accept; Production Function approaches; Revealed Preference approaches; Stated Preference approaches.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Karpagam, M. (2001). Environmental Economics. (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Private Limited.
Kolstad, C. D. (2012). Environmental Economics. (2nd ed.). United States: Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Baumol, W. J. & Oates, W. E. (1998). The Theory of Environmental Policy. (2nd ed.). United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
Bhattacharya, R. N. (2001). Environmental Economics. (1st ed.). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE*   (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

MSE*: Mid Semester Examination, ESE**: End Semester Examination

 

BMST341 - MEDIA AND HUMAN RIGHTS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to make the students to understand and get familiarized with the concepts and approaches of human rights. The course facilitates the students to understand the relationship between human rights and media and enables the students to study human rights and legal mechanism of safeguarding the dignity of the individual. and, through the close study of documentary films and other audio - visual material, this course introduces the concept of human rights issues.

Course Objectives:

This course is designed to help students hone their analytical thinking and writing skills. In addition, after having taken this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand key concepts on human rights
  • Discuss current topics on human rights with greater understanding and skill.
  • Students examine how audiovisual material, especially the documentary form, play a global watchdog role and both inform and persuade human rights stakeholders. "Information intervention" thus is seen through the lens of human rights principles.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Critically examine about the role of the media in human rights promotion.

CO2: Identify ethical dilemmas facing journalists, filmmakers and other media professionals.

CO3: Display a good understanding of the nature and scope of special legislations dealing with protection of human rights of marginalised and vulnerable sections

CO4: Use analytical tools to examine pertinent case studies and relevant global trends.

CO5: Assess and examine what human rights are in terms of its relationship to media production.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction of Human Rights
 
  • Concepts of Human rights
  • Definition, Importance and scope of human rights
  • Development of human rights in global perspective
  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights
  • Civil and Political rights
  • Economic, social and cultural rights
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Media and the Social World
 
  • Media impact on individual and society
  • Democratic Polity and mass media
  • Media and Cultural Change
  • Rural‐Urban Divide in India:grass‐roots media 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Issues and Human Rights in India
 
  • Indian constitution and human rights
  • Human rights in India
  • National Human Rights Commission: India
  • Violation of human rights in India
  • Women, children and human rights
  • Human rights movement
  • Human Rights and Non Government Organization (NGO)
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Media and Human Rights
 
  • Coverage of human rights issues in media
  • Role of new media and human rights
  • Challenges in reporting human rights issues
  • Right to inspect the spot: Examination of reports
  • Monitoring techniques
  • Complaint mechanism
  • Role of mass media in the protection of human rights
  • Case studies
Text Books And Reference Books:

Balabanova, E. (2015). The media and human rights: The cosmopolitan promise. London: Routledge.
Chatterjee, D. (2011). Dalits rights / human rights. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.
Jadeja,Mayursinh J. (2017). Democracy and Human Rights. New Delhi: book enclave.
Peetush, A., & Drydyk, J. (2015). Human rights: India and the West (First edition.). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Pollis Adamantia. (2017). Human Rights: New Perspectives,New Realities. New Delhi: Viva Books.
Sharma Subhash. (2018). Human Rights Text and Context. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.
Simmons, B. A. (2009). Mobilizing for human rights: International law in domestic politics. Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Ghere, R. K. (2016). NGO Leadership and Human Rights. New Delhi: Viva Books.
Givan, R. K., Roberts, K. M., & Soule, S. A. (2010). The diffusion of social movements: Actors, mechanisms, and political effects. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Mangubhai Jayshree.P. (2014). Human Rights as Practice. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Nolan, A. (2014). Economic and social rights after the global financial crisis. U K: Cambridge University Press.
Reilly Niamh. (2015). Women's Human Rights: Seeking Gender Justice in a Globalizing Age. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 (20 MARKS Individual assignment)
MSE (25 MARKS Written Exam)
CIA 3 (20 MARKS Group Assignment) and
ESE (30 Marks Written Examination)
Attendance 5 Marks
(*Mid Semester examination will be conducted for 50 marks and converted to 25 marks
*End Semester examination will be conducted for 50 marks and converted to 30 marks)
 
 

BMST351 - MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This subject gives them a precise idea about how to understand the multimedia platform and it introduces them to technologies for multimedia processing. Digital image processing is a core part of the subject.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • Gain knowledge about multimedia.
  • Use technological aids for better learning.
  • Understanding the multimedia communications systems, application and basic principles and presentation of multimedia communications.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Use of multimedia applications

CO2: Develop the analytical ability of how technology is associated with our everyday life.

CO3: Implement theoretical knowledge into practical exercises.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to multimedia
 

Definition of Multimedia; Multimedia systems; Multimedia applications; Multimedia architecture; Evolving systems of multimedia; Digital Media and Hypermedia; Cloud computing; Artificial intelligence (AI); Internet of Things (IOT).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Multimedia authoring technique
 

Multimedia file formats; standards; communication protocols; Types and methods of compression and decompression; Image authoring and editing tools; Image file formats such as JPEG, TIFF, GIF, PNG, Colour modes: RGB, CMYK; Layering concept and visuals: contrast, brightness, HUE, Saturation, Balance, Contrast Ratio.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Digital photography and composition
 

Introduction to the Camera, Human eye and the camera, Digital and manual camera equipment, Photographic camera types, Basic camera parts and icons, Changing Technology in Photography, Film and digital photography; Introduction to Lens and Photographic Optics – Understanding camera lenses and the optics involved; Understanding Light and colour for photography; Six Elements of Design, Line, Shape, Form, Texture, Pattern and Colour, Understanding, Composition, Framing, Angles and Perspective, Leading lines, Golden ratio, Rule of thirds, Foreground and background, Light and composition, Learning different compositional styles from the works of great photographers

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Post-processing of digital images
 

Introduction of some software and tools used in digital image post processing including Adobe Bridge, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Lightroom, Software Interfaces and workflow, File Formats, Image Processing and Printing.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Animation
 

Introduction to 2D animation, Types of Animation, key frame animation, stop motion animation and types text animation.3D applications for animation, Rendering - techniques, Integrating audio with animation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bhunia, C. T. (2009). Multimedia and multimedia communication. New Delhi: New Age International. 
Craven, G. M. (1990). Object and Image, An Introduction to Photography. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
Hunter, F., Fuqua, P. & Biver, S. (2013). Light: Science and Magic: An Introduction to Photographic Lighting. Taylor and Francis.
Peterson, B. (2010). Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs with a Film or Digital Camera. Amphoto Books.
Ray, T. (2011). Online Journalism: A Basic Text. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Sloane, A. (1996). Multimedia communication. London: McGraw-Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Halsall, F. (2001). Multimedia communications: Applications, networks, protocols, and standards. Harlow: Addison-Wesley.
Schaefer, J. P. (1992). Basic Techniques of Photography: Ansel Adams Guide. Boston: Little Brown and Company.
Van, S. M., & Chou, P. A. (2011). Multimedia over IP and Wireless Networks. Academic Press.
Wang, Y., Ostermann, J., & Zhang, Y. Q. (2007). Video processing and communications. Taipei: Pearson Education Taiwan.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment outline :

Internal assessment: Over all CIA submission for 70 marks
Project I: 20 Marks 
Project II: 30 Marks
Project III: 20 Marks
End semester Submission: Project IV: 50 Marks* (End semester submission and viva)
End Semester submission will be conducted for 50 marks and converted to 30 marks.

 

BPOL331 - INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course examines the structural aspects of the Indian state. The course offers a detailed understanding of important parts of the Indian Constitution. Also, explains the important organs of the state and their structural equations.  Specifically, it provides debates on the principles of separation of powers by equating among legislature, executive and judiciary.

The course aims to help students to:

 ●        understand the contemporary issues and debates of Indian Constitution.

 ●        understand the structural importance of the Indian state.

 ●        understand the nature, structure and working of the Constitution and the functional implications involved in it.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Analyse how constitutionalism evolved and legislature, executive and judiciary relations will be determined by various constitutional factors.

CO2: Illustrate the philosophy and structure of the India Constitution

CO3: Demonstrate the structural determinants of legislature, executive and judiciary in handling the state affairs.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Constitutional Development
 

1858 to 1909, 1919, 1935 and 1947 Acts. Framing of the Constitution – Role of Constituent Assembly. Preamble – Philosophy of the Constitution. Salient Features. Basic Structure Doctrine. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Key Aspects
 

Citizenship. Fundamental Rights. Fundamental Duties. Directive Principles of State Policy.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
Union and State Legislature
 

Organisation and Working. Law-making process. Parliamentary Committees. Decline of Legislature and Reforms.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:18
Union and State Executive
 

Offices of President, Vice President and Prime Minister. Union Council of Ministers – Organisation and Functions. Offices of Governor, Lt. Governor and Chief Minister. State Council of Ministers – Organisation and Functions. Parliamentary and Presidential forms of Government: A debate.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:13
Indian Judicial System
 

Organisation. Supreme Court: Composition and Jurisdiction. High Court: Composition and Jurisdiction. Judicial Review. Judicial Activism. Public Interest Litigation. Judicial Reforms.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Avasthi, AP. (2016). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Lakshmi Narain Agarwal.
  • Bakshi, P.M. (2012). The Constitution of India. New Delhi: Universal Law.
  • Chakrabarty, B. and Pandey, R.K. (2008). Indian Government and Politics. New Delhi: Sage.
  • Fadia, B.L. (2016). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Sahitya Bhawan.
  • Ghai, K.K. (2015). Indian Government and Politics. Noida: Kalyani.
  • Ghosh, P. (2014). Indian Government and Politics. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
  • Johari, J.C. (2014). The Constitution of India: A Politico-Legal Study. New Delhi: Sterling.
  • Kashyap, S. (2014). Our Parliament. New Delhi: National Book Trust.
  • Kashyap, S.C. (2011). Our Constitution. New Delhi: National Book Trust.
  • Saxena, R. and Singh, M.P. (2011). Indian Politics: Constitutional Foundations and Institutional Functioning. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Basu, DD (2015). Introduction to the Constitution of India, Lexis Nexis; Second edition
  • Fadia, B.L. (2016). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Sahitya Bhawan.
Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

 

 

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

 

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

 

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 20 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 50 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 20 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 50 = 15 Marks

 

 

BPOL341 - INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course examines public policymaking, implementation, and analysis with special reference to India. Moreover, it provides policy actors, structures, institutions and in the policymaking process, Approaches, and models of public policy. Students learn how diverse types of public policies are formulated, implemented, monitored, and evaluated. The course also provides the role of executives and challenges they experience during the policy implementation.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • explain basic understanding on public policy related concepts in the context of political science and public and public administration. 
  • develop the knowledge on various theoretical approaches to public policy analysis; and the policy-making cycle as a model to analyzing the public policy process.
  • orient towards patterns of policy changes over time. Finally, the course aims to develop the students to creatively explore a policy issue of their choice near the end of the term and write a policy on a topic of their choice.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify and explain the major theoretical approaches to policy studies.

CO2: Understand the importance of the policy context and be able to analyze how various ideas, ideologies, discourses, actors, institutions, and structures influence the policymaking process.

CO3: Explain the stages of the policy cycle and understand how they are interrelated.

CO4: Map out policy implications, challenges in the process of policy implementation and evaluation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction
 

Public Policy: Evolution, Meaning, Nature, Scope and Importance; Public Policy, Public Administration and Governance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Approaches to the Study of Public Policy and its determinants
 

Political System theory, Group theory, Rational Choice theory and Elite Theory.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Process of Policy Formation
 

The role of official stakeholders: Legislature, Civil servants, Judiciary & Policy Research Institutions. Non- Official Policy Stakeholders: Public Opinion, pressure groups and Media.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Policy Implementation
 

Definition and Objectives of Implementation. Approaches and Models: Top-Down Rational system approach, Bottom-Up Approach, A synthesis of Bottom-Up and Top-Down Approaches. Implementation Organs: Political executive and Bureaucracy.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Policy Evaluation and Monitoring
 

Policy Evaluation: Role, Process and Criteria, Evaluating Agencies – Problems in Policy Evaluation: Crisis of governance. Policy Monitoring: Approaches and Techniques, Constraints in Policy Monitoring, Measures for Effective Policy Monitoring.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Daniel Learner and Harold D.Lasswell (1965). The Policy Sciences: Developments in Scope and Method Recent (eds.), Stanford University Press. 
  • Michael Moran (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy, OUP, London.
  • Kraft Michael E. and Scott R. Furlong (2010). Public Policy: Politics
  • R.K.Sapru (2013). Public Policy, Sterling Publishers.
  • Thomas A Birklans, (2014). An Introduction to the Policy Process: Theories, Concepts and Models of Public Policy Making, ME Sharp Publishers, New York.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Frank Fischer, Gerald Miller, Mara S. Sidney, (2012). Handbook of Public Policy Analysis: Theory, Practice and Methods, Taylor & Francis Group, CRC Press, New York.
  • Wildavasky. A (1979). The Art and Craft of Policy Analysis, Transaction Publishers.
  • Charles L.Lindblom and Edward Woodhouse (1980). The Policymaking Process, Chapters: 1,2,3, and Appendix.
  • Ram Reddy and G.Haragopal (1985) Public Policy and Rural Poor in India, Jain publishers.
Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

 

 

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 50 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 50 = 15 Marks

 

SDEN311 - SKILL DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been designed to enable the students to acquire skills that would help them in the process of knowledge acquisition. Through this engagement, it will revisit and question different notions of knowledge and how it is constructed, created, disseminated, and acquired. The course would also enable the students to understand various research practices that are the focal point of the discipline. Also central to the course is an inquiry on the process and role of critical thinking in the discipline and in the larger context of society and nation.

Course Objectives

The course is designed to:

  • enhance skills required for knowledge acquisition
  • develop a comprehensive knowledge of the variety of research practices in the discipline
  • hone and nurture their critical thinking abilities

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate critical reading abilities in multiple contexts

CO2: Recognize the politics of knowledge production and dissemination

CO3: Apply various research methods introduced in the course in their areas of interest

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Data Interpretation "Show Me the Data"- Quantitative
 

This unit is primarily invested in the study of quantitative data. The unit will focus on the various ways in which data is elicited and analyzed. It will also give a brief idea about how quantitative data, which is highly monotonous in nature can be presented in an interesting way. Taking examples from the field of English, History, and Political Science, this unit will identify the sub-fields related to these disciplines which deal with large data sets.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Data Interpretation "Show Me the Data"-Qualitative
 

Data Interpretation Module will cover Qualitative Research Methods in Language Studies. This module will give students the opportunity to explore the different types of qualitative research methodologies used within applied linguistics, linguistics and language and culture research. This will be focused on to an examination of what counts as evidence within a qualitative research framework and how qualitative research evidence can be evaluated. Students will examine a range of qualitative research methodologies, such as case study, ethnography, participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, discourse analysis. Students will apply this knowledge to a personal research interest.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Thinking: "To Think or Not to?"- Multiple Intelligences
 

The unit would primarily engage with the question of what it means to think and revisit some of the notions that are related to the act of thinking and the notion of intelligence. Focussing on the concept of multiple intelligence put forward by Gardener, the unit aims to provide a platform for the students to discuss and deliberate on intelligence and the possibility of exploring multiple intelligence.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Critical Thinking: "To Think or Not to" - Deferential thinking
 

Drawing from an informed understanding of the concept of multiple intelligence, this unit will explore the need to look at thinking as a multi-layered process. The aim here is to make students aware of the need to think differently than attempting to fit into what is normative.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Continuous Learning - The Holy Cycle: Unlearn, Learn and Relearn?
 

Continuing with the questions of thinking and intelligence, this unit focuses on the process of learning and assessing what it means to be a learner in the contemporary era. This unit aims to impart the skills which will make learners value and practice dynamicity and acknowledge the need for appreciating multiple perspectives.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Social Awareness: "Know Thy Neighbour"- Know Your Regime
 

Social awareness provides an individual the ability to understand and respond to the needs of others. This course focuses on social awareness - the ability to understand and respond to the needs of others. This is the third of the domains of emotional intelligence proposed by Daniel Goleman. Research indicates that emotional intelligence can be learned and be measurable differences directly associated with professional and personal success. Furthermore, it may be responsible for up to 80% of the success we experience in life. The course focuses on the basic areas of emotional intelligence namely self-awareness, self-management; empathy/social awareness and relationship management. Students will be able to comprehend how self-awareness reflects understanding, personal acceptance & an overall understanding of personal psychology.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Social Awareness "Know Thy Neighbour": " In Short - Of Reading"
 

This module will help students learn and understand the fundamental motivations for reading. The module will introduce students to the various aspects of reading and writing and will help focus on the need to read with a sense of social awareness, responsibility and ethical action towards reading. This module aims to help students acquire the cognitive domain-related skills in helping them to appraise, develop, value, critique and defend their acts of reading. The module will include introduction to thinkers like Borges, Scholes, Booth, Fish and others who have written about reading and its responsibilities.

Text Books And Reference Books:

_

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

_

Evaluation Pattern

General Evaluation Pattern: Unit-Wise Continuous Evaluation

 The evaluation will be based on the assessments formulated by the PTC student-instructors who facilitate each unit in the class. A continuous evaluation pattern will be followed whereby after the completion of each unit, an assignment will follow. The assessment will be done based on predefined rubrics and the score sheet needs to be tabulated. The cumulative score sheet is to be prepared at the end of the semester and the final Skill Development Score is to be computed.

BECO431 - INDIAN ECONOMY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course aims at introducing the planning and development trajectory of the Indian economy. It also brings out some of the key issues associated with sectoral growth, occupational structure and productivity. The efforts towards privatisation and its impact are also discussed. The course then extends the discussion to India’s external economy and examines the trends in the balance of payment, trade and the role played by WTO in determining India’s external policy. Further, the course traces the macroeconomic policies adopted in India and their performances. It concludes with a module specific to Karnataka including the growth pattern of the GSDP and the sectoral contribution to the same. The planning process in the state of Karnataka and policies pertaining to education and development are also highlighted. 

 Course Objectives:

The course aims to:

  1. provide an overall understanding of the planning process in India, the major challenges faced by the Indian economy and India’s position in the global economy with respect to various parameters.
  2. trace the trends in India’s external sector and the role of WTO in formulating India’s external policies.
  3. comprehend the Macroeconomic policies adopted in India in recent times and their impact. 
  4. introduce key issues related to economic growth and development in the state of Karnataka. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: demonstrate a clear understanding of India?s economic growth trajectory and compare it with that of other developing/developed economies.

CO2: identify the trends in India?s external sector and interpret the role of WTO in formulating India?s external policies.

CO3: analyse the macroeconomic policies adopted in India in recent times.

CO4: determine the growth trends and development policies in the state of Karnataka.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Economic Development Since Independence
 

Major features of the economy at independence; growth and development under different policy regimes- goals and constraints, institutions- Niti Aayog: structure, role and functions. Determinants of economic development; Indicators of Development—Human Development Index (HDI) and Gender Development Indices; Human resource development; Role of state, market and other institutions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Sectoral Growth and Private-Public Sectors
 

Growth trends of primary, secondary and tertiary sectors, state wise comparison, comparison with other countries, low productivity issues, challenges and prospects; changes in occupational structure and employment; private vs. public sector; privatization and disinvestment policies; sick units in public sector, strategy for revival of sick public sector units, small scale industries.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
External Sector
 

External sector and its significance, movement of capital, manpower and goods, recent trends in BOPs and exchange rate fluctuations, WTO requirements; foreign trade- composition, direction and organization, India’s trade policy and tariff policy; external debt and fiscal reforms, India and regional integration.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Macroeconomic Performance and Policies
 

Recent economic reforms; changing role of RBI, recent changes in monetary and fiscal policy (FRBMA) and their effectiveness, Federal finance, Finance Commissions, black money - estimates, genesis, consequences and remedies and comparison with other countries, Evaluation of recent development programmes in India.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
An Overview of Karnataka Economy- Policies, Prospects and Challenges
 

Trends and growth pattern of SGDP and human development in Karnataka, comparison with other Indian states; sectoral performance, industrial and agricultural policies, problems and prospects of different sectors; State planning process- planning objectives and strategies, decentralized planning, intra-state disparities; education, health and housing, budgetary trends; Evaluation of recent development programmes in Karnataka.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Datt, G., & Mahajan, A. (2016). Indian economy. (72nd ed.). New Delhi: S. Chand & Company Pvt. Ltd.

Iteshamul, H. (2015). A Handbook of Karnataka. Government of Karnataka, Bangalore, A Government of Karnataka Publication.

Kapila, U. (2016). Indian Economy – Performance and Policies (17thed.). New Delhi: Academic Foundation.

Misra, S. K., & Puri, V. K. (2011). Indian economy (34thed.). Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Alder Aiyar, S. S., & Mody, A. (2011). The demographic dividend: Evidence from the Indian states (No. 11-38). International Monetary Fund.

Balakrishnan, P. (2007). The recovery of India: Economic growth in the Nehru Era. Economic and Political Weekly, 52-66.

Baru, R., Acharya, A., Acharya, S., Kumar, A. S., &Nagaraj, K. (2010). Inequities in access to health services in India: caste, class and region. Economic and Political Weekly, 49-58.

Basu, K. (2009). China and India: idiosyncratic paths to high growth. Economic and Political Weekly, 43-56.

Deaton, A., &Drèze, J. (2009). Food and nutrition in India: facts and interpretations. Economic and Political Weekly, 42-65.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2013). An uncertain glory: India and its contradictions. Princeton University Press.

Dyson, T. (2013). Population and development: the demographic transition. Zed Books Ltd

Economic Survey of India, 2016-17. [New Delhi].

Economic Survey of Karnataka 2016-17. [Bangalore]

Himanshu, R., & Sen, A. (2010). Towards new poverty lines for India. Economic and Political Weekly, 45(1), 2-8.

Himanshu (2011). Employment Trends in India: A Re-examination. Economic and Political Weekly, 43-59.

James, K. S. (2008). Glorifying Malthus: Current debate on 'demographic dividend' in India. Economic and Political Weekly, 63-69.

Kapila, U. (Ed.). (2009). Indian economy since independence. Academic Foundation.

Meti, T. K. (1976). The Economy of Karnataka: An Analysis of Development and Planning. New Delhi: Oxford & IBH Publishing Company.

Mohan, R. (2008). Growth record of the Indian economy, 1950-2008: A story of sustained savings and investment. Economic and Political Weekly, 61-71.

Narayana, M. R. (2004). An Overview of the Karnataka Economy'. Chapter One in Karnataka Development Report, Institute for Social and Economic Change.

Shetty, S. L. (2007). India’s Savings Performance since the Advent of Planning’. Institutions and Markets in India’s Development.

Somasekhara, N. (1978). Planning and Development in Karnataka: Targets, Allocations, and Perspectives. Geetha Book House.

 

Vaidyanathan, A., & Krishna, K. L. (Eds.). (2007). Institutions and Markets in India's Development: Essays for KN Raj. Oxford.

 

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20%

25%

20%

30%

05%

* Mid Semester Exam ** End Semester Exam

BECO441 - STATISTICS AND ECONOMETRIC METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course covers the statistical and econometric foundations of data analysis including the statistical and econometric theory and its applications. In particular, statistics modules broadly cover descriptive statistics, theory of probability, standard statistical distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing. Econometric modules cover the basic aspects of econometric methodology, OLS method and assumption violations (Autocorrelation, Multicollinearity and Heteroscedasticity). The specific objective of these modules is to provide an understanding of the basic concepts and methods of Statistics and Econometrics for application in data analysis, to get analytical skills required for the analysis of socio-economic data, to provide hands-on training in data analysis (along with computer applications). The emphasis is on application (including analysis and interpretation) rather than theoretical derivations. The idea is to impart training on how to make an argument based on data.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand the concepts and methods of Statistics and Econometrics for application in data analysis.
  • acquire skills in data analysis through statistical and econometrics techniques (along with computer applications).

Learning Outcome

CO1: On completion of the course, the students will be able to explain the basic concepts of statistics, probability theory, econometrics and their applications for decision-making in economics, business and other fields of social sciences.

CO2: On completion of the course, the students will be able to nalyze and interpret various socio-economic data applying various statistical tools and econometrics techniques.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Statistics
 

Meaning, scope of statistics, importance and limitation of statistics Collection of Data: Planning and organizing a statistical enquiry, methods of collecting primary data, sources of secondary data; Classificationof data: Meaning, methods of classification; Tabulation of Data: Meaning, role, parts of a table, general rules of tabulation;Presentation of Data: Diagrams and graphs, general rules for construction a diagram, types of diagrams, types of graphs, software applications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
 

Measures of Central Tendency: Mean, median and mode, geometric and harmonic mean, Measures of Dispersion: Range, interquartile range and quartile deviation, mean deviation, standard deviation; Graphical Method:Lorenz curve and Gini coefficient; Moments, skewness and kurtosis;Partition Values: Quartiles, deciles, percentiles and software applications.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Probability Concepts
 

Approaches to Assigning Probabilities: Meaning, classical probability, empirical probability, subjective probability;  Rules for Computing Probabilities: Rules of addition, rules of multiplication; Probability Distribution:Random variables, discrete random variable, continuous random variable (Binomial, Poisson and Normal distribution).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Econometric Methods: Correlation and OLS Method
 

Definitions and scope of econometrics; The methodology of econometric research; Specification and estimation of an econometric model; Basic concepts of estimation; Desirable properties of estimators; Unbiasedness, efficiency, consistency and sufficiency; Correlation vs Regression.Correlation Analysis: Meaning, types of correlation; Methods of Studying Correlation: Scatter diagram method, graphic method, Karl Pearson’s co-efficient of correlation, Spearman’s rank method. OLS Method: Introduction, estimation of simple linear regression model; assumptions of OLS.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Violation of OLS Assumptions
 

 Problem of Heteroscedasticity; Autocorrelation (AR1 process); Multicollinearity, their consequences, detection method and remedies.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anderson, D. R., Sweeney, D. J., Williams, T. A., Camm, J. D., & Cochran, J. J. (2014). Essentials of Statistics for Business and Economics. Boston: Cengage Learning.
Gujarati, D. N., Porter, D.C., &Gunasekar, S. (2017). Basic Econometrics. (5thed.). New Delhi: McGrawHill.
Sharma, J. K. (2010). Fundamentals of Business Statistics. (2nded.). New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.
Studenmund, A. H. (2016). Using Econometrics: A Practical Guide. (7thed.). New Delhi:  Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Koutsoyiannis, A. (1973). Theory of Econometrics. New York: Harper & Row.
Wooldridge, J. M. (2014). Introductory Econometrics: A Modern Approach (4thed.). New Delhi: Cengage Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

 Question Paper Pattern: MSE and ESE (Max. Marks = 50)

Section A

Section B

Section C

5 x 2 = 10 Marks

6 x 5 = 30 Marks

1 x 10 = 10 marks

BEMP441A - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

The course introduces a detailed overview of research methodology. First, it introduces the meaning, definition, types and importance of research. Thereafter, methods and approaches of social science research will be discussed. The course then introduces different components of research problems and research design. The last sections of the course elaborate survey designs, methods of data collection, data processing, and hypothesis testing. The final section discusses the ways of report/article/thesis writing.  

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  1. understand the nature of research and methods adopted in social science;
  2. illustrate the importance of research problems and design to conduct research in economics;
  3. explain the appropriate sampling design and data collection to conduct research in economics;
  4. illustrate the steps involved in developing hypotheses and show appropriate statistical tools to test the same;
  5. develop the skills required to write research report.

Learning Outcome

CO1: explain the nature of social science research by using deductive and inductive methods

CO2: explain research methods applicable to economics discipline and show the importance of literature review in developing the research problem

CO3: illustrate probability and non-probability sampling techniques to collect data by using an interview schedule or questionnaire

CO4: explain parametric and non-parametric tools to test the hypothesis

CO5: discuss the format of research report and reference style to write the research report

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Nature of Social Research
 

Meaning and definition of research, criteria for good research, objectives of research, difficulties in social research, utility of research.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Methods and Techniques of Social Research
 

Deductive and inductive methods, classification of research, case study, survey methods.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Selection of Research Problem
 

Steps involved in selection of research problem, evaluation of the problem, literature review, sources of literatures.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Research Design
 

Meaning of research design, types of research design, evaluation of research design.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Sampling and Sample Design
 

Meaning of sampling, sampling process, essential and methods of sampling, sampling errors.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:5
Methods of Data Collection
 

Primary and secondary data, observation, interview-questionnaire schedule, sources of secondary data.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:12
Hypothesis Testing
 

Meaning of hypothesis, types; Five-step procedure for testing hypothesis; Type I and Type II error, one-tailed and two-tailed tests of significance; Parametric Tests: One sample ‘t’ test, independent sample ‘t’ test, paired sample ‘t’ test; Analysis of variance (‘F’ test); Non-Parametric Test: Chi-square test. (Using SPSS application).

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:4
Report writing
 

Types of report; Planning of report writing; Format of research report; Reference styles.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Cargan, L. (2007). Doing Social Research. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Kothari, C. R. (2014). Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques (2nded.). New Delhi: New Age International Publishers.

Walliman, N. (2016). Social Research Method: The Essentials. London: SAGE Publications.

Wellington, J. &Szczerbiński, M. (2007). Research Methods for the Social Sciences. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Andres, L. (2012). Designing & Doing Survey Research. London: SAGE Publications.

Buchanan, D. A., & Bryman, A. (2009). The SAGE Handbook of Organizational Research Methods. London: SAGE Publications.

Gillham, B. (2000). Case Study Research Methods. London: Continuum International Pub. Group.

Gillham, B. (2008). Small-scale Social Survey Methods: Real World Research. London: Continuum International Publishing Group. 

Hammersley, M., &Traianou, A. (2012). Ethics in Qualitative Research: Controversies and Contexts. London: SAGE Publications.

Mustafa, A. (2008). Case Study Method: Theory and Practice: Research and Management Approaches. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers & Distributors.

Ornstein, M. D. (2013). A Companion to Survey Research. London: SAGE Publications.

Saldaña, J. (2012). The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers. London: SAGE Publications.

Saunders, M., Lewis, P., & Thornhill, A. (2011). Research Methods for Business Students (5thed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education Ltd.

Yang, K. (2010). Making Sense of Statistical Methods in Social Research. London:  SAGE Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE(CIA2)

CIA3

ESE

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

BEMP441B - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Introduce the students to research concepts and methods in a bid to approach things in a systematic manner. This subject will provide an understanding of the research methods and concepts.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • To familiarize students with the process of research
  • To sharpen their investigative capacities
  • To educate them about data collection and how to analyse data.

Learning Outcome

CO 1: Research project guided by the teacher of a topic from journalism.

CO 2: To be able to work on a research project while applying the knowledge of the research process.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Research
 

Social Research: Concepts, Nature and Scope, epistemology, ontology; Qualitative and quantitative research; Theory in research: Positivism and interpretivism, theoretical framework, contribution to theory; Research steps and its types; Objectivity/subjectivity, Reliability and Validity in qualitative and quantitative research; Variables and Hypothesis: Type of hypothesis, Characteristics of good hypothesis, hypothesis testing.; Research questions for qualitative research

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Process of Research
 

Research designs: Survey research, Content analysis, Textual analysis, focus groups; Sampling and its types; Tools and Techniques of Data Collection, Questionnaire: Schedule, Interview and Observation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Data Analysis
 

Statistical analysis: measures of central tendency (mean, mode and medium); Measures of dispersion (standard deviation); Correlation and chi square; Level of Measurements; Nominal, Ordinal, Ratio and Interval; Transcription, coding; Thematic analysis of qualitative data

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Research Application
 

Data processing, Analysis, Presentation and interpretation of data, Use of graphics in data presentation; Research writing: Research proposal, research report: Components and style, Preparation of Bibliography, Index; Communication research, Media research, Basic elements of research.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kothari, C., & Garg, G. (2014). Research methodology Methods and Techniques (3rd ed). New Delhi: New Age International (P) Ltd.
Wimmer, R. D., & Dominick, J. R. (2014). Mass media research: An introduction.Wadsworth Pub. Company, Belmont.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Joshi, U., Pahad, A., & Maniar, A. (2002). Media research: Cross-sectional analysis. New Delhi: Authors Press.
Mukherjee, A., Goyal, P., Singh, A., Khosla, A. K., & Chand, K. K. (January 01, 2019). Pursuit of Research.
Poonia, M. (2009). Media research. New Delhi: Vishva Bharati Publications.
Berger, A. A. (1999). Media research techniques. Thousand Oaks, Calif: SAGE.
In Sloan, L., & In Quan-Haase, A. (2017). The SAGE handbook of social media research methods.
Gunter, B. (2000). Media research methods: Measuring audiences, reactions and impact. New Delhi : SAGE Publications, 2000.
Menon, A (2009). Media Planning And Buying. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill.

Evaluation Pattern
  • Internal assessment: Over all CIA submission for 70 marks
  • Project I: 20 Marks 
  • Project II: 30 Marks
  • Project III: 20 Marks
  • End semester Submission: Project IV: 50 Marks* (End semester submission and viva)
  • End Semester submission will be conducted for 50 marks and converted to 30 marks..

 

BEMP441C - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Knowledge of how Political Science has to be researched and written is as important a component as studying the discipline. Issues that are contested, problems of ideological orientation as well as the structure in writing political phenomenon are areas that are relevant for a better understanding of the Discourse. As an extension this whole process translates well into understanding ‘Writing’ as a creative & intellectual activity that requires a certain extent of academic rigor for greater validation.

 Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • Understand the primacy of research as a vital component of academic activity.
  • Explore the various nuances of writing as a thought & as an activity

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge regarding the philosophy of research

CO2: Define and explain the techniques of data collection, field study and writing skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Philosophy of Methods
 

Epistemology, Ontology and Philosophy; Inductive-Deductive Logic; Empiricism, Rationalism and Skepticism; Positivism, Structuralism, and Post Structuralism/ Post Modernity; Hermeneutics, Semiotics, Ethnography, Content and Discourse Analysis

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Operating Philosophical Methods
 

Social Science Research – Types, Requisites & Stages of Research; Sources – Categorization and Usage; Selection of a Research Problem – Towards a Research Design

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Data Collection Methods
 

Data collection, processing and analysis Gathering data:  Primary source of data/information, Secondary source of data/information.  types of interviews, questionnaires, surveys, sampling and FGDs

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Research Writing
 

Methods of data processing, tabulating, and interpreting. Writing a Thesis – Review of Literature, Compilation of research analysis - the Format of the thesis; Referencing styles and the need for them. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

King, Gary, Keohane, Robert O. and Verba, Sydney. (1994). Designing Social Enquiry: Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research. Princeton University Press, New Jersey.

Flick, Uwe. (2015). Introducing Research Methodology. Sage Publications, Delhi.

Popper, K. (2009). Science: Conjectures and refutations. The Philosophy of science: a historical anthology. Oxford: Wiley.

Ricoeur, P. (1991). A Ricoeur Reader: Reflection and imagination. University of Toronto Press.

Heidegger, M. (1988). The basic problems of phenomenology (Vol. 478). Indiana University Press.

Gadamer, H. G. (2013). Truth and method (Bloomsbury revelations). London Bloomsbury.

Peter Lambert and Phillipp Schofield. (2008). Making History: An Introduction to the history and practices of a discipline. London. Routledge.

B. Sheik Ali. (2000). History its theory & method. New Delhi. Laxmi Publications.

Kothari, C.R.(2004). Research Methodology Methods and Techniques. New Delhi. New Age Publishers.

Alexander Rosenberg, Lee McIntyre (2020). Philosophy of Science A Contemporary Introduction. New York. Routledge.

Williams, Malcolm. (1996).  Introduction to Philosophy of Social Research . London. UCL Press.

A  M Novikov D  A Novikov. (2013). Research methodology from philosophy of science to research design. Florida. CRC Press.

 Zimmermann, Jens. (2015). Hermeneutics A Short Introduction. Oxford. OUP.

Daniel Chandler. (2002). Semiotics the basics. Oxford. Routledge,

David M. Fetterman. (2010). Ethnography Step-by-Step. California. Sage.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Austin, G. (1966). The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a nation. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Austin, G. (2003). Working a democratic constitution: A history of the Indian experience . New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Kaviraj, S. (1988). A critique of the passive revolution. Economic and political weekly, 2429-2444.

Chatterjee, P. (1993). The nation and its fragments: Colonial and postcolonial histories (Vol. 11). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Amin, S. (1995). Metaphor, Memory: Chauri Chaura, 1922-1992. Univ of California Press.

Pandey, G. (2006). Routine violence: Nations, fragments, histories. Stanford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

BEMP441C

Research Methodology

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

BMST451 - AUDIO-VISUAL PRODUCTION (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is to provide students with the opportunity to explore a wide range of audio and visual production technologies and techniques. It is a technical course supported by a selection of written and oral presentation activities. Students work individually as well as in small teams as they proceed through production exercises and projects. It combines theory, history and practice with hands-on demonstrations, workshops, screenings, readings, lectures and discussions, thus preparing students to produce documentary videos of various styles Over the course, they will create an assortment of audio and video production projects. The equipment used will include (digital) video cameras; lights; microphones; computers; audio and video digitizers; and a variety of video production support equipment. Software utilized in the course will introduce students to storyboarding; video editing; digital effects; image manipulation and audio production. They will also be introduced to documentary-style filmmaking.

 Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • Apply the basic steps inherent in the audio and video production processes.
  • Demonstrate awareness of Audio and Video production career opportunities.
  • Demonstrate basic audio and video production knowledge, and terminology. 
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a variety of digital acquisition hardware, digital cameras, CD/DVD recorders/drives, samplers, microphones, etc.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of multi-track/MIDI digital audio recording utilizing a computer and audio production software.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of basic digital video as it relates to the non-linear and post-production process.
  • With the basic capabilities to tell socially engaging stories through documentaries.
  • Demonstrate the ability to research, develop and produce a documentary film.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Learn how to make a video and audio production with a theoretical and practical orientation.

CO2: Produce a short single camera video production.

CO3: Produce a 30-60 sec. TV or Radio Commercial.

CO4: Produce a 15 minutes documentary of any social issue.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Audio Production
 

Equipment: Microphones, Mixers, Cables and Consoles, Analog and Digital Recording and Signal Processing, Loudspeakers and Monitoring; Production: Synchronization, Studio Production, Field Production, Staged Production; Post Production: Dialogue & Sound Effects in post-production, Editing, Mixing and Recording

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to video production
 

Step 1- Research, Step 2 – Pre-Production: Script/ Storyboard, Allocating Equipment, Schedules Personnel, Permits/Permissions/Release Forms; Step 3- Production: How to set up a shoot, Lighting, Audio, how to shoot (Rule of thirds, an interview and 1800 rule); Step 4- Post Production: Transfer your footage, set up to edit, Working with Audio, music and narration, Render and export.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Understanding the documentary
 

Introduction to Realism Debate, Observational and Verité documentary, Introduction to shooting styles, Introduction to Editing styles, Basic elements of the documentary, Selection of story and script, Different stages of documentary production techniques, Researching the Documentary.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Documentary storytelling and production
 

Research: Library, Archives, Location, life stories, ethnography; Writing a concept: telling a story, Treatment, Writing a proposal and budgeting.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Post-production and Final production
 

Pre-production: Research, fact-finding and story development; Production: lighting, shooting, sound; Post-production: Editing, sound and finishing.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Belavadi, V. (2013). Video production. New Delhi: Oxford University Press
Musburger, R. B., & Ogden, M. R. (2014). Single-camera video production. New York: Focal Press
Owens, J., & Millerson, G. (2012). Television production. Waltham: Focal Press, an imprint of Elsevier
Barnouw, E., & Krishnaswamy, S. (1963). Indian film. London: Columbia University Press
Grant, B. K., & Hillier, J. (2009). 100 documentary films. Basingstoke: Palgrave 
Macmillan.Martin, J. R., & Martin, A. J. H. (2014). Create documentary films, videos and multimedia: A comprehensive guide to using documentary storytelling techniques for film, video, Internet and digital media projects. Orlando, Florida: Real Deal Press.
Jag, M., & India. (1990). Documentary films and national awakening. New Delhi: Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Govt. of India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Millerson, G., & Millerson, G. (2013). Lighting for television and film. Oxford: Focal Press.
Millerson, G. (2015). Video camera techniques. Oxford: Focal Press.
Stinson, J. (2007). Video communication & production. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
Owens, J. (2016). Television production. New York, NY: Focal Press.
Boon, T., & Rotha, P. (2008). Films of fact: A history of science in documentary films and television; written to mark the centenary of Paul Rotha, documentarist, 1907-1984. London: Wallflower Press.
Renov, M. (2015). Theorizing documentary. London; New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group,
2015 Trisha Das How to Write a Documentary Double Take by PSBT.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal assessment: Overall CIA Project submission for 70 marks
Project I: 20 Marks 
Project II: 30 Marks
Project III: 20 Marks
End semester Submission: Project IV: 50 Marks* (End semester submission and viva)
End Semester submission will be conducted for 50 marks and converted to 30 marks.

BPOL431 - INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS-II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course examines the procedural aspects of the governments in India both at central as well as state level. The course offers an analysis with special reference to Constitutional bodies like Union Public Service Commission, Comptroller and Auditor General, Finance Commission, NITI Aayog and National Human Rights Commission.  Specifically, it provides knowledge relating to Local Self-Governments at various levels.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand the relationship between political equations and government System.
  • explore contemporary issues in procedural aspects of legislative, administrative, and financial relations between Union and state governments.
  • analyse the working equations of Constitutional and statutory bodies in India.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Analyse the roles of legislature, executive and judiciary in handling the state affairs, structural, institutional and procedural aspects.

CO2: Examine the functional and procedural aspects of the governments in India both at central as well as state level.

CO3: Demonstrate how Union and state relations will be determined by various factors.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Union and State Relations
 

Unitary and Federal features. Legislative, Administrative and Financial Relations. State Autonomy debate. Sarkaria Commission recommendations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:18
Major Constitutional and Statutory bodies
 

Union Public Service Commission. Comptroller and Auditor General. Finance Commission. NITI Aayog. National Human Rights Commission. Chief Information Commission.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:19
Party System and Election Process
 

Features of Party System. Rise of Regional Parties. Anti-Defection Law. Elections- Constitutional Provisions. Election Commission of India – Organisation and Functions. Pressure Groups and Public Opinion.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Local Self-Government
 

73rd, 74th Constitutional Amendments, Urban and Rural local bodies. Parallel organizations.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Key Issues and challenges
 

Social Justice-reservations. Secularism. Communalism. Regional Disputes. National Integration.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Avasthi, AP. (2014). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Lakshmi Narain Agarwal.
  • Bakshi, P.M. (2014). The Constitution of India. New Delhi: Universal Law.
  • Chakrabarty, B. and Pandey, R.K. (2008). Indian Government and Politics. New Delhi: Sage.
  • Ghai, K.K. (2015). Indian Government and Politics. Noida: Kalyani.
  • Ghosh, P. (2012). Indian Government and Politics. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
  • Johari, J.C. (2004). The Constitution of India: A Politico-Legal Study. New Delhi: Sterling.
  • Kashyap, S. (2011). Our Parliament. New Delhi: National Book Trust.
  • Kashyap, S.C. (2011). Our Constitution. New Delhi: National Book Trust.
  • Saxena, R. and Singh, M.P. (2011). Indian Politics: Constitutional Foundations and Institutional Functioning. New Delhi: PHI Learning.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Fadia, B.L. (2020). Indian Government and Politics. Agra: Sahitya Bhawan.
  • Ghai, K.K. (2015). Indian Government and Politics. Noida: Kalyani.
Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

 BPOL431

 Indian Government and Politics- II

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

BPOL441 - POLICY ANALYSIS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Policy analysis provides a basic level analysis orientation towards public policy. This course is designed to prepare students to write and analyze a policy and offer an alternative public policy, which is a public policy analysis exercise. Topics include conceptual understanding of policy analysis, process of policy analysis, Identifying and structuring public policy problem, models, and tools of policy analysis.   

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • understand the conceptual foundation for and the process of doing policy analysis. 
  • orient models, and tools used in the analysis of public policy.
  • explore the research techniques and methods, sources of data collection models and tools that will be used to analyze policy formulation and execution.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify, structure, and analyze public policy problems and design research strategies.

CO2: Examine the process of undertaking a policy analysis exercise.

CO3: Equipped with sufficient methodological grounding to undertake a research paper.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction and Conceptual Foundation of Policy Analysis
 

Policy Analysis: Meaning, typology, characteristics, significance, scope and implications. Analysis, evaluation and its differences.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Approaches and Models in Policy Analysis
 

Approaches of Policy Analysis: Scientific Approaches; Professional Approaches and Political Approaches. Five Models of Policy Making: A Rational Decision-Making Process, Apolitical Game, A Discourse, A Garbage Can and An Institutional Process.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Public Policy Problem
 

Characteristics, identifying and structuring policy problem. Designing a strategy to address the policy problem with special reference to welfare and developmental policies in India.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Policy Alternatives and Recommendations
 

Formulating policy options, evaluating policy options and making policy recommendations. Discursive Practices of policy analysis in India.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Fischer, F., Miller, G., and Sidney, M. S. (2012). Handbook of Public Policy Analysis: Theory, Practice and Methods. Taylor & Francis Group, CRC Press, New York.
  • Sapru, R. K. (2013). Public Policy. Sterling Publishers.Weimer and Vining, (2010). What is Policy Analysis? Pearson (5th Edition), New York 
  • Wildavasky A. (1979). The Art and Craft of Policy Analysis, Transaction Publishers.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Frank Fischer, Gerald Miller, Mara S. Sidney, (2012). Handbook of Public Policy Analysis: Theory, Practice and Methods, Taylor & Francis Group, CRC Press, New York.
  • Creswell, Research Design, (2014). Sage Publications, California. (Chapters 1, 9,10 & 11)
  • Moran, M. (2013). The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy. OUP, London.
Evaluation Pattern

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details - SUBMISSION PAPER  

 BPOL441

 POLICY ANALYSIS

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

 

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

 

Individual Assignment

Assignment Submission 

Group Assignment

Submission Policy Case

 

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

 

SDEN411 - KNOWLEDGE APPLICATION SKILLS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course has been designed to promote professional skills in the students. The theme identified for the third and fourth semesters is Critical thinking and professional Development. The topics identified under the theme will enable the students to understand the challenges faced during their career and allow them to face them with necessary skills. 

The course aims to: 

  • develop discipline specific skills for professional and personal growth.
  • provide a platform to nurture and hone skills necessary for professional development. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate skills required for professional workspaces

CO2: Apply academic and professional skills for self-development and organisational development.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
Unit Outline
 

Students must choose MOOC courses offered by various online platforms in the specific theme given for the third and fourth semesters. This consists of review of literature, reference management system, workspace etiquettes, critical analysis writing, SOP, article analysis, writing argumentative essays, resume writing, cover letters and job finding through an online portal.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

---

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

---

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation pattern

 

Attendance

Submitting report

40 % weightage

60 % weightage

 

BECO531 - PUBLIC ECONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The paper deals with the nature of government intervention and its implications for allocation, distribution and stabilization. This study involves a formal analysis of government taxation and expenditures. This paper combines a thorough understanding of financial institutions with a careful analysis of the issues which underline budgetary policies in general and the Indian experience in particular.

Course Objectives

  • To give the students an in-depth understanding of public debt, government taxation and expenditures.
  • To provide students with a thorough understanding of the theories governing public finance.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Explain the mainstream approaches to the study of Public Economics.

CO2: Role of Government in Organized Society.

CO3: Explore the economic foundations for public goods and public structure.

CO4: Relevant issues related to taxation, public expenditure and public debt.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Role of Government in Organised Society
 

The nature, scope and significance of public economics; Public vs Private Finance; Principle of Maximum Social advantage: Approaches and Limitations, Functions of Government; Economic functions; allocation, distribution and stabilization; Regulatory functions of the Government and ts economic significance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Public Sector and Public Goods
 

Concept of the public sector- Need for the public sector- Concept of public goods- Characteristics of public goods- National vs. local public goods- Merit goods and club goods- Market failure and public Provision- Provision versus production of public goods- Determination of provision of public good- Samuelson’s rule- Externality: the concept of social versus private costs and benefits.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Public Revenue and Taxation
 

Sources of Public Revenue- Tax revenue and non-tax revenue- Concept of tax- Canons of taxation- Approaches to the principle of Equity in taxation: (a) Ability to Pay principle (b) Benefit Approach- Taxable capacity- Incidence of taxes- Modern theory of incidence- Types of taxation- Laffer curve analysis- GST.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Public Expenditure and Public Debt
 

Structure and growth of public expenditure- Pure theories of public expenditure: Samuelson’s pure theory of public expenditure - General Theories of Public Expenditure: (a)Wagner’s Law of increasing state activities (b) Wiseman-Peacock hypothesis (c) Colin Clark’s critical limit hypothesis- Trends of Public expenditure in India- Subsidies in India- Concepts of public debt- Types of public debt- Burden of public debt- Approaches to the burden of public debt (Pigou, Buchanan and Musgrave)- Redemption of public debt- methods- Growth of India’s public debt.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Government Budget and Fiscal Federalism
 

Government budget and its structure – Receipts and   expenditure- Concepts of current and capital account- Functional classification of the budget- Balanced, surplus, and deficit budgets- Concepts of fiscal imbalances- revenue deficit, effective revenue deficit, fiscal deficit and primary deficit- Budget, government policy and its impact (Budget multipliers)- Concept of federalism- Different layers of the government- Principles of federal finance- Inter-governmental transfer and Theory of Grants- Horizontal vs. vertical equity in devolution- Finance Commission

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bagchi, A. (2005). Readings in Public Finance. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Jha, R. (2010). Modern Public Economics (2nded.). London: Routledge.
Musgrave, R. A., & Musgrave, P. B. (2004). Public Finance in Theory and Practice (5thed.). New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Atkinson, A., & Stiglitz, J. E. (2015). Lectures on Public Economics. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
Basu, K. (2016). An Economist in the Real World: The Art of Policymaking in India. New Delhi: Viking books.
Cullis, J., & Jones, P. (2009). Public Finance & Public Choice (3rded.). New York: Oxford University Press.
Hyman, D. N. (2011). Public Finance: A Contemporary Application of Theory to Policy (10thed.). Boston: Cengage Learning.
Jalan, J., Marjit. S., &Santra, S. (2016). India Public Finance and Policy Report 2016: Fiscal Issues and Macro Economy. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Rao, M. G. (2010). Public Economics: Theory and Policy – Essays in Honor of Amaresh Bagchi. New Delhi: Sage India.
Stiglitz. J. E., &Rosengard, J. K. (2015), Economics of the Public Sector (4thed.). New Delhi: W. W. Norton & Co Inc.
Ulbrich, H. H. (2003). Public Finance: In Theory and Practice. London: Thomson Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE*(CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

MSE*: Mid Semester Examination, ESE**: End Semester Examination

BECO541 - LABOUR ECONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The course aims at providing the students with the basic understanding of the microeconomic aspect of labour theories and labour market. The students have to understand the labour market structure, wage determination, unemployment, the growth pattern and the changes that have taken place in labour regulations of the country. The course also aims to introduce the various data available in the field of labour and employment such as NSS data on employment and unemployment that will enable the students to associate real situations with theories.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  1. demonstrate the microeconomic aspect to understand the functioning of different labour markets.
  2. examine the evolving wage payment mechanism and discrimination in the labour market.
  3. understand the various determinants of employment, unemployment and the mobility of labour.
  4. evaluate the labour regulation and labour market policies in India

Learning Outcome

CO1: explain the demand for and supply of labour in different labour market conditions.

CO2: examine the objectives of wage policy and analyse the labour market discrimination.

CO3: explain the human capital model to understand employment, unemployment and the mobility of labour.

CO4: compare labour market regulation in India with ILO Core labour standards.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Labour Economics
 

Unique features of the labour market; Participants in the labour market; Labour market terminologies; Labour in classical, neo-classical and Keynesian analysis; Evolution of labour economics as a discipline post 1945; Classification of labour markets; Positive and normative economics in the context of labour markets; Labour markets and Pareto efficiency; Causes of labour market failure.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Labour Market Analysis
 

Demand for labour: Determinants of demand for labour, substitution and scale effect, short run vs. long run demand for labour; Firm, industry and market demand for labour; Elasticity of derived demand: The Hicks-Marshall rules, cross elasticity of demand for labour; Supply of labour: Static Labour-Leisure Choices-supply curve of labour; Indifference curves and budget constraints; Reservation wage; Labour market equilibrium: wage and employment determination in monopsony; perfectly competitive and monopoly labour markets; Monopoly union model and its impact on wage rate.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Wage and Labour Market Discrimination
 

Wage concept and Definitions; minimum wage, living and fair wages; Methods of wage payment: time and piece wage; Wage policy; Objective and importance; Evolving wage structure and differentials in India, productivity-wage relationship in India; Labour market discrimination; Economic analysis of labour market discrimination; Employer and Employee discrimination, Statistical discrimination; measuring discrimination- the Blinder-Oaxaca model.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Employment, Unemployment and Labour Mobility
 

Determinants of employment and unemployment, Measurement issues; the human capital model, modified human capital model; the added worker and discouraged worker hypothesis; segmented labour market; job search and vacancy analysis; Gender and employment; Unemployment, causes and consequences – technology and employment – Recent trends of employment and unemployment in India; Determinants of labor mobility and migration, Offshoring-Onshoring trends and Visa policies in India.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Labour Regulations and Labour Market Policies in India
 

Role of regulations in labour markets, Economic case for labour market regulations- Labour regulations in India-its impact and their enforcement-Trade unions in India-Factors affecting their growth and measures to help maintain union relevance- ILO Core Labour Standards and its impact on Indian Labour Policy- Recent trends in Working conditions- Social security and Insurance-Welfare Funds-Employment Exchanges-Vocational education and training.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Borjas, G. J., (2005)  Labor Economics . (3 rd ed). Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill/Irwin. 

Ehrenberg, R. G., & Smith, R.S. (2012). Modern Labour Economics: Theory and public Policy. (11th ed.). New York: Prentice Hall. 

McConnell, C. R; Stanley, L.B & MacPherson., (2017). Contemporary Labor Economics, (11th ed), New York: McGraw-Hill.

Reynolds, Lloyd. G., & Masters, S. H. (1997). Labour Economics and Labour Relations (11th ed), New York: Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Borjas, G. J., (2005) Labor Economics. (3rd ed). Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

Reynolds, Lloyd. G., & Masters, S. H. (1997). Labour Economics and Labour Relations (11th ed), New York: Pearson.

Ashenfelter, O., & Card, R. (2011). The Hand book in Labor Economics. (Vol. 4A), New York: North-Holland.

Ashenfelter, O., & Layard. R. (1986). The Hand book in Labor Economics. (Vol.1) New York: North-Holland.

Ashenfelter, O., & Layard. R. (1999). The Hand book in Labor Economics. (Vol.3A, 3B, & 3C). New York: North-Holland.

Becker, G. S., (1992). Human Capital: Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd ed.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

BEMP581 - INTERNSHIP (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

One of the requirements of B.A. (Economics, Media Studies, Political Science) students at CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is the ability to apply theoretical knowledge acquired in their course to practical applications.  Hence, the students are expected to complete a short internship during the summer break after the fourth semester as part of the course curriculum.   Having undergone extensive understanding/training in Economics/Political Science/Media studies theories, Statistics & Econometrics, and Research Methodology, this course enables students to demonstrate an understanding of how to apply theoretical knowledge to practice in different organizations/institutions of their choice. The minimum duration of the internship is stipulated as four weeks. It is evaluated based on set criteria out of 50 marks and has a maximum of two (2) credits.

Course Objectives: 

The course aims to help students to:

  • apply theoretical knowledge to practical, real-life problems.
  • analyse data/information through a scientific method.
  • relate the acquired skills in practical application(s) and gain industry experience.

Learning Outcome

CO1: identify socio/economic/managerial/political issues and develop a framework to conduct an enquiry.

CO2: identify sources of data and tools (Statistical/Mathematical/Econometric techniques) to analyse the collected data.

CO3: utilise the theoretical knowledge acquired to solve socio/economic/ managerial/ political issues and gain industry experience.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
The methodology adopted for internship: Economics
 

The students are expected to identify and communicate to the organisation/ institution where they want to pursue their internship.  The same should be communicated to the Department of Economics and get approved before the commencement of the internship.  As a requirement, the students must submit a letter of confirmation of their internship from the interning organisation/ institution.  After completing the internship, the students should submit a final Internship Report and Bluebook (internship diary) for evaluation (includes viva-voce examination).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:0
The methodology adopted for internship: Media Studies
 

The Students need to fulfil the following criteria for internship evaluation:

The students are expected to identify and communicate to the organisation/ institution where they want to pursue their internship. The same should be communicated to the Department of Media Studies and get approved before the commencement of the internship.  A letter of confirmation from the organisation has to be submitted to the department before the internship commences.  The internship has to be undertaken by the student for four weeks (minimum 24 days).  A Daily work log has to be maintained by the student through the internship course, and the same should be submitted weekly to the faculty mentor.  The student must submit a Consolidated Internship Report [FINAL REPORT] to the department after completing the four-week internship.   A Certificate / Letter of Completion issued by the organisation has to be submitted to the department.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:0
The methodology adopted for internship: Political Science
 

The Students need to fulfil the following criteria for internship evaluation:

The students are expected to identify and communicate to the organisation/ institution they want to pursue their internship.  The same should be communicated to the Department of International Studies, Political Science and History, and approved before the commencement of the internship.  A letter of confirmation from the organisation has to be submitted to the department before the internship commences.  The internship has to be undertaken by the student for four weeks (minimum 24 days).  A Daily work report followed by weekly reports must be maintained and submitted on time by the student to the respective faculty mentor.  The student must submit a final internship report and the Internship dairy copy to the department after completing the four-week internship and along with all the required documents.  A Certificate of Completion issued by the organisation has to be submitted to the faculty and the department.  VIVA will be conducted to review the work done by the student to assess the learning outcomes.

Text Books And Reference Books:

The mentor will suggest the essential readings for an internship at the interning organisation/institution.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The additional readings will include the materials suggested by the internship mentor for broad learning of concepts, theories, and methodologies to be used in the internship.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation at the beginning of the 5th semester is based on the following categories:

Economics Internship:

Particulars

Marks

 

BLUE-BOOK/Google Classroom (50 % Weightage)

 

 

Nature of work

10 marks

 

Effective usage of Google Classroom (Interaction/Guidance/Q&A)

05 marks

 

Effective usage of time / Mentor’s Evaluation

05 marks

 

Internship Certificate (Completion Certificate)

05 marks

 

Sub Total

 

25 Marks

VIVA-VOCE EXAM (50 % Weightage)

 

 

Presentation

10 marks

 

Learning outcome(s) / Skill set(s) acquired

05 marks

 

Final report

05 marks

 

Q&A

05 marks

 

Sub Total

 

25 Marks

Grand Total

 

50 Marks

 

Media Studies Internship:

Particulars

Marks

 

BLUE-BOOK/Google Classroom (50 % Weightage)

 

 

Weekly reports (Four weeks)

20 marks

 

Final report including organisation mentor remarks and internship completion certificate

05 marks

 

Sub Total

 

25 Marks

VIVA-VOCE EXAM (50 % Weightage)

 

 

Presentation

05 marks

 

Learning outcome(s) / Skill set(s) acquired

15 marks

 

Q&A

05 marks

 

Sub Total

 

25 Marks

Grand Total

 

50 Marks

 

Political Science Internship: 

Particulars

Marks

 

BLUE-BOOK/Google Classroom (40% Weightage)

 

20 Marks 

Quality of Weekly Reports

10 Marks

 

Effective usage of Google Classroom (Interaction/Guidance/Q&A)

10 Marks

 

INTERNSHIP REPORT (30% Weightage)

 

15 Marks

Organization of report writing

10 Marks

 

Adherence to the timeline

05 Marks

 

Sub Total

 

35 Marks

VIVA-VOCE EXAM (30 % Weightage)

 

 

Organization of Presentation

10 Marks

 

Clarity in learning outcome(s) / Skill set(s) acquired

05 Marks

 

Sub Total

 

 15 Marks

Grand Total

 

50 Marks

 

BMST531 - MEDIA, GENDER AND SOCIETY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will explore culture, society and the representation of gender through media and the ways in which media content enables, facilitates and challenges these social constructions in society. Students will focus on the gendered aspects of society and culture.

Course Objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • Gain insight into the ways in which gender and its intersections with race, ethnicity and class is enacted and represented
  • Explore the socio-cultural mechanisms that shape our individual and collective notions of identity 
  • Make sense of what it means to be male, female or the third gender

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Analyse the role of media in society

CO2: Identify the representation of gender and minorities in the media.

CO3: Examine the impact and implications of media content in shaping social constructions in society

CO4: Understand the relationship between media, society and gender

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Understanding Gender
 
  • Concepts of sex and gender
  • Gender identity
  • Gender expression
  • Transgender, and transsexual
  • History of gender issues and feminism; Feminist theory
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Media and Gender
 
  • Gender and Media: Industry, audience, text
  • Judith Lorber, “Believing is Seeing: Biology as Ideology”
  • Laura Mulvey, “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema”
  • Media representation: Femininities, Sexualities, Masculinity and visual culture analysis
  • Brenda Cooper, “Boys Don’t Cry and Female Masculinity: Reclaiming a Life and Dismantling the Politics of Normative Heterosexuality
  • Media Production: Gendered media
  • Kristen Shilt, “I’ll Resist With Every Inch and Every Breath
  • ’ Girls and Zine Making as a Form of Resistance”
  •  Digital Culture: gender and online self-presentation
  • Sharon Cumberland, “Private Uses of Cyberspace: Women, Desire, and Fan Culture”
  • Contemporary gender movements (Case study)
  • He for She, Me too movement, Times Up
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Understanding Culture and Society
 
  • Concept of culture and society
  • Cultural values, cultural norms, cultural diversity
  • Culture-high culture, low culture
  • Global culture-cultural diffusion, role of mass media
  • Hofstede’s Cultural Dimension
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Media and Society
 
  • Interplay between Media and Society
  • Cultural implications
  • Popular Culture and Society
  • Through the lens of film, music, games, television, fashion, comic and sports
  • Media representation: Minorities
  • Globalization and the future
  • Social issues and social media-digital culture
Text Books And Reference Books:

Hooks, B. (1996). Reel to Reel: Race, Sex and Class at the Movies. New York: Routledge.
Lauretis, De. (1987). Technologies of Gender: Essays on Theory' Film and Fiction. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
Mark, D. (1997). Concrete Jungle: A Pop Media Investigation of Death and Survival in Urban Ecosystems.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Michel, F. (1978). The History of Sexuality Trans. New York: Pantheon. (2016). 
Understanding Media and Culture: An Introduction to Mass Communication. University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing Edition.
Croteau, D & Hoynes, W. (2003). Media Society: Industries, Images and Audiences. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.
Burton, G. (2010). Media and Society: Critical Perspectives. New Delhi, India. Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 (20 MARKS), MSE* (50 MARKS Written Exam) CIA 3 (20 MARKS) and ESE* (50 Marks Written Examination) Attendance 5 Marks. 
(*Mid Semester examination will be conducted for 50 marks and converted to 25 marks, *End Semester examination will be conducted for 50 marks and converted to 30 marks)

 

BMST541 - MARKETING COMMUNICATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description 

This course provides students with the knowledge of theoretical and structural models of marketing communication and aims to equip students with the tools necessary to create promotional campaigns. Students will be actively involved in designing and implementing various communication strategies in marketing.

course objectives

The course aims to help students to:

  • Understand the concept, theories and communication strategies.
  • Understand consumer’s psychology and behaviour. 
  • Equip students with the latest concepts and techniques of marketing communication to meet customer demand on social media platforms.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Plan, implement and evaluate the process of marketing communication

CO2: Clarity on consumer?s psychology and behaviour

CO3: Gain working knowledge with social media management tools

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Concepts
 

Market: Definition, Concept, Meaning; Marketing concept; Marketing mix; Environmental factors; Marketing planning and strategies; basic concepts of communication: Model, theory and cycle.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Basics of Consumer Behavior
 

Psychological influences affect consumer behaviour; Major socio-cultural influences on consumer behaviour; Stages in the consumer decision process.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Integrated Marketing Communication
 

Integrated Marketing Communication; Meaning and role of IMC in the marketing process, One voice, Inside out approach, Outside in approach; IMC Tools: Advertising, Public Relations, Direct marketing, Personal Selling, Sponsorship; Developing IMC: Objectives, Budget, Media planning and selection decisions, Implementation, Measuring the effectiveness of all Promotional tools and IMC; Case Study: Selected Brands

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Social Media management
 

Overview of Social Media; Social media campaigns; Application of Social media management tools (create advertising campaigns for Social media)

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Baker, M. J. (2003). The Marketing Book. Burlington, Massachusetts: Butterworth-Heinemann Publications.
  • Evans, L. (2010). Social Media Marketing: Strategies for engaging in Facebook, Twitter and other Social Media. Indianapolis, US
  • Belch, G. & Purani, K. (2013). Advertising & Promotion- An Integrated Marketing Communications Perspective. TATA McGraw Hill.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Bonime, A & Pohlmann, C K. (2002) Writing for New Media: The Essential Guide to Writing for Interactive Media, CD ROM, and the WEB. John Wiley & Sons, New York
  • Brogan, C.(2010) Social media 101: Tactics and tips to develop your business online John Wiley & Sons, New Jersey
  • Pattuglia, S. (2007). Integrated Marketing Communication and Brand Management: The Case Study of FIAT 500, New York, US.  McGraw Hill.
  • Thompson, C. J., Rindfleisch, A., & Arsel, Z. (2006). Emotional branding and the strategic value of the doppelgänger brand image. Journal of Marketing
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 (20 MARKS), MSE* (50 MARKS Written Exam) CIA 3 (20 MARKS) and ESE* (50 Marks Written Examination) Attendance 5 Marks. 

(*Mid Semester examination will be conducted for 50 marks and converted to 25 marks

*End Semester examination will be conducted for 50 marks and converted to 30 marks)

BPOL531 - INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is a comprehensive study of International Relations. It provides a foundational understanding of the theories and concepts of International relations. It will aid the students to analyse the major themes in international affairs and world politics.

Course Objectives:

The course aims to help students to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of different schools of thought in International Relations.
  • Develop an ability to integrate the theories and contextualize contemporary global events.
  • Outline the behaviour of nation-states in the international arena.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: compare and contrast major schools of thought in International Relations.

CO2: identify various historical events that led to the development of contemporary International affairs.

CO3: develop an overview of the major contemporary challenges and issues in global politics.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Fundamentals of International Relations
 

International Relations: Meaning, nature, scope and importance; Concepts and Theories of International Relations – Realism and Neo – Realism Liberalism and Constructivism.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:11
Traditional and Non-Traditional Security Threats
 

National Power: Meaning, elements, evaluation of national power.

National Security: Traditional and Non-Traditional concept of security

Human Security: Meaning and Importance        

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:14
War and Terrorism
 

War: Meaning, Nature, Causes, Types and Remedies.

Terrorism – Causes, Types, Role of State and Non-State actors in Terrorism, Counter terrorism.  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Approaches to International Peace
 

Concepts and Approaches to Pacific Settlement of International Disputes.                                                                                                  

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Instruments of Foreign Policy
 

Nature, Objectives, Determinants, Instruments of Foreign Policy

Diplomacy – Nature, Functions, Privileges and Immunities. Types of Diplomacy.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

Baylis, J. and Smith, S. (eds.) (2011), The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, London: OUP.

Heywood, A (2014), Global Politics, Palgrave Foundation.

Martin Griffiths and Terry O Callaghan (2002) ‘International Relations: The Key Concepts’.     Routledge London and New York.

Brown, C and Kirsten Ainley (2005), ‘Understanding International Relations’ 3rd edition, Palgrave Macmillan New York.

Crenshaw, M. (1981). The causes of terrorism. Comparative politics, 13(4), 379-399

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Crenshaw, M. (2008). The debate over “new” vs.“old” terrorism. In Values and Violence (pp. 117-136). Springer, Dordrecht.

Devatak, D, Anthony Burke and Jim George (2007), ‘An Introduction to International Relations: Australian Perspectives’, Cambridge University Press.

Hans J Morgenthau (1948)‘Politics among Nations: The Struggle for Power and Peace’, Alfred A Knopf, New York.

Kenneth Waltz(1979) ‘Theory of International Politics’. Addison-Wesley Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Outline:

Course Code

Course Title

Assessment Details

BPOL531

Introduction to International Relations

CIA 1

MSE

(CIA 2)

CIA 3

ESE

Attendance

20

Marks

25

Marks

20

Marks

30

Marks

05

Marks

Individual Assignment

Written Exam

Group Assignment

Written Exam

 

 

 

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15

Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15Marks

 

Section A:

3 x 5 = 15 Marks

Section B:

2 x 10 = 30 Marks

Section C:

1 x 15 = 15 Marks

 

 

BPOL541A - WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

It would be a severe underestimation to consider Western Political Thought as just another discipline, as Western Political Thought is a testament of political creation. Western political Thought narrates the story of how to constitute an ideal body-politic, but the ideal has never been exhausted, which has inspired thinkers from Plato to Marx to articulate their own version of ideal body-politic. The course is designed to introduce students to main thinkers of Western Political Thought, to give them an idea as how Western Political Thought has developed. The course would attempt to give students a rigorous overview of Western Political thought by evoking the original text of thinkers concerned. The course would engage with texts like Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Politics and Machiavelli’s The Prince. The course would also attempt to develop a culture of doing a rigorous, hermeneutic way of reading a text which will also take into consideration the context into which thinkers ‘performed’ their philosophy.