Department of
ECONOMICS






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Economics, Political Science, Sociology)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ECO301 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR ECONOMICS 2 2 50
ECO331 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 5 5 100
ENG321 ENGLISH-III 3 2 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN321 KANNADA 3 03 50
POL331 INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 5 4 100
SAN321 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
SOC331 CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES 5 5 100
TAM321 TAMIL 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ECO431 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 5 5 100
ENG421 ENGLISH-IV 3 2 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN421 KANNADA 3 03 50
POL431 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 5 5 100
SAN421 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
SOC431 STUDY OF INDIAN SOCIETY 5 5 100
TAM421 TAMIL 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO531 STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
ECO541A PUBLIC FINANCE 4 4 100
ECO541B MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR ECONOMICS 4 4 100
ECO541C BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
POL531 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 4 100
POL541A FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC POLICY 4 4 100
POL541B DEMOCRACY AND ETHICS 4 4 100
SOC531 METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH 4 4 100
SOC541A ANALYSIS OF CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS 4 4 100
SOC541C SOCIAL ECOLOGY 4 4 100
SOC541D SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION 4 4 100
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
ECO631 INDIAN ECONOMY 4 4 50
ECO641A ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
ECO641B FINANCIAL ECONOMICS 4 4 100
ECO641C INTRODUCTORY ECONOMETRICS 4 4 100
POL631 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: INSTITUTIONS AND POLICY MAKING 4 4 100
POL632 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 4 4 100
SOC631 WOMEN AND SOCIETY 4 4 100
SOC641A STUDY OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 4 4 100
SOC641C SOCIOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT 4 4 100
SOC641D MEDIA AND SOCIETY 4 4 100
SOC641E CULTURAL AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION OF CONTEMPORARY KOREA 4 4 100
SOC681 DISSERTATION-II 0 2 100

AEN321 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course is taught in the second year for students from different streams, namely BA, BSc

 

and BCom. If the first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ

 

University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian voices in English and Indian

 

regional literatures in translation for the Additional English students of the first year, the

 

second year syllabus intends to take that project a little further and open up the engagement

 

of the students to texts from across the world. The syllabus - selection of texts will

 

concentrate on readings from South Asian, Latin American, Australian, Canadian, and Afro-

 

American. It will voice subaltern concerns of identity, gender, race, ethnicity and problems of

 

belongingness experienced by humanity all over the globe.

 

The syllabus will extend the concerns of nation and nationality and marginalization,

 

discussed within the Indian context to a more inclusive and wider global platform. We have

 

consciously kept out ‘mainstream’ writers and concentrated on the voices of the subalterns

 

from across the world. There is an implicit recognition in this project that though the aspects

 

of marginalization and the problems facing subalterns are present across cultures and

 

nations, the experiences, expressions and reflections are specific to each race and culture.

 

The course will address these nuances and specificities and enable our students to become

 

more aware and sensitive to life and reality around them. This will equip the students, who

 

are global citizens, to understand not just the Indian scenario, but also situate themselves

 

within the wider global contexts and understand the spaces they will move into and negotiate

 

in their future.

 

There is a prescribed text book Blends: Voices from Margins for the second year students,

 

compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

Course Objectives

 

The course objectives are

 

 to enable students to look at different cultures through Literature

 

 to help students develop an understanding of subaltern realities and identity politics

 

 to inculcate literary sensibility/taste among students across disciplines

 

 to improve language skills –speaking, reading, writing and listening

 

 to equip the students with tools for developing lateral thinking

 

 to equip students with critical reading and thinking habits

 

 to reiterate the study skills and communication skills they developed in the previous

 

year and extend it.

Learning Outcome

CO1: it will enable students to understand and analyse the nuances of cultures, ethnicities and other diversity around them and become sensitive towards them.

CO2 : They will be able to critique literature from a cultural, ethical, social and political perspectives

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Children?s Novel
 

TetsukoKuroyanagi: Tottochan: The Little Girl at the Window12

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Short Story
 

Liliana Heker : “The Stolen Party

 

 Higuchi Ichiyo: “Separate Ways”

 

 Harukki Murakami "Birthday Girl"

 

 Luisa Valenzuela: “I’m your Horse in the Night”

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Poetry
 

Poetry 12 Hrs

 

 Silvio Curbelo: “Summer Storm”

 

 Nancy Morejon: “Black Woman”

 

 Ruben Dario: “To Roosevelt”

 

 Mina Asadi: “A Ring to me is a Bondage”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Essay
 

Essay 9Hrs

 

 Amy Tan: “Mother Tongue

 

 Linda Hogan: “Waking Up the Rake”

 

 Isabelle Allande: “Open Veins of Latin America”

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blends Book II

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Oxford Encyclopeadia on Latin American History

Children's Literature -  Kimberley Reynolds (CUP)

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: A written test for 20 marks. It can be an Open Book test, a classroom assignment, an

 

objective or descriptive test pertaining to the texts and ideas discussed in class.

 

CIA2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 works

 

CIA 3: This is to be a creative test/ project in small groups by students. They may do

 

Collages, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes, presentations, debates,

 

charts or any other creative test for 20 marks. This test should allow the students to explore

 

their creativity and engage with the real world around them and marks can be allotted to

 

students depending on how much they are able to link the ideas and discussions in the texts

 

to the world around them.

 

Question Paper Pattern

 

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

Section A: 4x5= 20

 

Section B: 2x15=30

 

Total 50

 

End Semester Exam: 3 hrs

 

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

 

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

 

Total 50

ECO301 - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY FOR ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to enable students to understand the importance of research in creating and extending the knowledge base in their research interests. In this process, it develops the students' ability to distinguish between the strengths and limitations of different research approaches in general and in their research area specifically. Finally, the course imparts skills to work independently, to plan and carry out a small-scale research project.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate knowledge of research processes (reading, evaluating, and developing).

CO2: Perform literature reviews using print and online databases.

CO3: Employ American Psychological Association (APA) formats for citations of print and electronic materials.

CO4: Identify, explain, compare, and prepare the key elements of a research proposal/report.

CO5: Define and develop a possible research interest area using specific research designs.

CO6: Acquire skills to work independently to plan and carry out a small-scale research project.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Nature of social and business research
 

Meaning and definition of research–criteria for good research-Deductive and inductive methods– classification of research–case study–survey methods

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Selection of research problem
 

Steps involved in selection of research problem–evaluation of the problem– literature review– sources of literatures

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Research Design
 

Meaning of research design– types of research design- evaluation of research design

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Sampling and sample design
 

Meaning of sampling– sampling process– essential and methods of sampling – sampling errors

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Methods of data collection
 

Primary and secondary data– observation – interview-questionnaire– schedule-sources of secondary data

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Hypothesis testing
 

Meaning of hypothesis-types and steps in testing of hypothesis– type I and type II error

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:3
Report writing
 

Types of report – planning of report writing– format of research report– reference styles

Text Books And Reference Books:

1)      

1) Kothari, C.R. (2019), Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques, New Age International Publishers, New Delhi, 4th Edition.

2) Renjith Kumar (2019), Research Methodology – a step-by-step guide for beginners, Sage Publications, 5th Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1) Brinberg, D. and McGrath, J.E. (1985) Validity and the research process, Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

2) Fitz-Gibbon, C.T. and L. L. Morris (1987) How to Analyse Data, Newbury Park: Sage Publications, Inc.

3) Foddy, W (1993) Constructing Questions for Interviews and Questionnaires: Theory and Practice in Social Research, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Total Marks - 50 (Evaluation will be done at the departmental level)

ECO331 - FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is intended to give an understanding of the theoretical perceptions of economic growth and development together with the forces bringing about them. It also helps to broaden the awareness of the challenges in the developmental process and thus motivate the students towards the thought process of alternative solutions.

Learning Outcome

The students will

1. Gain conceptual base in Economic Dvelopment and Growth.

2. Familiarise with key models and theories in Dvelopment and Growth.

3. Gain insight in to the key issues of economic development.

4. Get awareness of the approaches to development efforts.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Meaning of Development and Relevant Concepts
 

Distinction between Growth and Development; PQLI; Human Development Index; Gender Development Index; Sen’s Capabilities Approach; Environmental Sustainability and Development; Common Characteristics of Developing Nations; Alternative Measures of Development.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Growth Models and Empirics
 

The Harrod-Domar model; the Solow model and its variants; Theories of endogenous growth with special reference to Romer’s model; the Big Push Theory and Lebenstence Theory of Critical Minimum Efforts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Approaches to Development
 

Balanced and Unbalanced Growth; Low Income Equilibrium Trap; Dual Economy Models of Lewis

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Poverty, Inequality and Development
 

Measurement of Poverty – Absolute and Relative; Head-Count Index and Poverty Gap Indices; Policy options for Alleviation of Poverty; Measurement of Income Inequality; Economic Growth and Income Inequality – Kuznet’s Inverted Hypothesis, Impact of Inequality on Development.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Urbanization and Informal Sector
 

Causes and effects of urbanization; Harris-Todaro Model of Rural-Urban Migration; Migration and Development; Policies for the Urban Informal Sector; Women in the Informal Sector; the Microfinance Revolution.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:13
Planning for development
 

Economic planning; Shadow prices, project evaluation and cost-benefit analysis; Concept of capital output ratio; Economic planning and price mechanism.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Todaro, Michael, P. and Stephen. C. Smith, (2015). Economic Development, Pearson Education, (Singapore) Pvt. Ltd., Indian Branch, Delhi.
  2. Ray, Debraj (2014), Development Economics, Seventh impression, Oxford University Press, New Delhi.
  3. Lekhi, R. K. (2016), The Economics of Development and Planning, Kalyani Publishers, New Delhi.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Abhijit Banerjee, Roland Benabou and Dilip Mookerjee, Understanding Poverty, Oxford University Press, 2006.
  2. Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom, Oxford University Press, 2000.
  3. Basu, K. Analytical Development Economics: The Less Developed Economy Revisited. (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1997)
  4. Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson, Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy, Cambridge University Press, 2006.
  5. Partha Dasgupta, Economics: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2007.
  6. Robert Putnam, Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy, Princeton University Press, 1994.
  7. Thirlwall, A.P. Growth, and Development with Special Reference to Developing Economies (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006) 8th Edition.
  8. Basu, K. 2012, editor, The New Oxford Companion to Economics in India, Oxford University Press.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - 20 Marks

CIA II (Mid Semester Examination)- 50 Marks

CIA III - 20 Marks

ESE - 100 Marks

ENG321 - ENGLISH-III (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description

English is offered as a course for all the students in BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA F&A classes in the third and fourth semesters. The aim is to strengthen the communication skills, and particularly study skills of the learners further, through adequate practice and exposure to good examples of writing, thought, ideas and human values. In addition, they will be trained in study skills through tasks in academic genres such as message, letter, essay, data interpretation etc. It aims to not only equip learners with skills but also sensitize them towards issues that concern human life in today’s globalised context. The course content is selected to meet the requirements of the departmental goal of “empowering the individual to read oneself, the social context and the imagined”; institutional goal of ensuring “holistic development”; and the national goal of creating competent and valuable citizens. The primary objective of this course is to help learners develop appropriate employability skills and demonstrate suitable conduct with regards to communication skills. The units are organised in order to help the learners understand the academic and workplace demands and learn by practice.

 

Course Objectives     

 

 

·       To enable learners to develop reading comprehension for various purposes

 

·       To enable learners to develop writing skills for academic and professional needs

 

·       To enable learners to develop the ability to think critically and express logically

 

·       To enable learner to communicate in a socially and ethically acceptable manner

 

·       To enable learners, to read, write and speak with clarity, precision and accuracy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Recognise the errors of usage and correct them. Recognize their own ability to improve their own competence in using the language

CO2: Read independently unfamiliar texts with comprehension. Read longer texts, compare, and evaluate them.

CO3: Understand the importance of writing in academic life. Write simple sentences without committing errors in spelling and grammar. Plan a piece of writing using drafting techniques.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to university grammar
 

 

Subject verb agreement

 

Tenses

 

Preposition

 

Voices

 

Clauses

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Strategies for Reading
 

 

Skimming and scanning

 

Strategies of reading

 

Reading and understanding reports

 

Reading content/ texts of various kinds

 

Inferencing skills

 

Academic vocab

 

Academic phrases

 

Professional expression

 

Study skills- library and referencing skills (organising reading, making notes, managing time, prioritising)

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Strategic writing for academic purpose
 

 

Mind mapping

 

Organising ideas

 

Accurate usage of vocabulary

 

Paragraph strategy

 

Cohesion and sequencing (jumbled sentences to paragraph)

 

Extended writing 

 

Formal and informal writing

 

Reports (all types including illustration to report and report to illustration and/or graphs, charts, tables and other statistical data)

 

Proposal writing (for projects, for research)

 

Academic essays/ articles

 

Persuasive writing, extrapolative writings

 

Case study writing

 

Executive summaries

 

Editing, proofreading skills

 

Resume vs CV

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Listening and Oral communication
 

 

Self-introduction

 

Body language

 

Talks, speeches and presentations

 

Conversation

 

Telephone conversation

 

Meetings

 

Group discussion

 

Seminar / conference presentation

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Business communication
 

 

Principles of communication

 

Process of communication

 

Types of communication

Barriers in communication

Text Books And Reference Books:

NIL

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

ENGlogue -2

Evaluation Pattern

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test/ written or oral tasks for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester exam for 50 marks.

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any creative assignments.

 

 End- semester 50 marks 

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRN321 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the Arts, Science and Commerce UG program

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to communicate with native speakers and make presentations on small topics

CO 2: Proficiency in literary analysis, appreciation and review of poems,play ,films and fables

CO3: Acquaintance of culture, civilization, social values and etiquettes, and gastronomical richness

CO 4: Ability to do formal and informal, oral and written communication.

CO 5: Overall knowledge on functional and communicative aspects and get through a2 level exams.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 1
 

To perform a tribute: artist, work, you are going to…..

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 2
 

Towards a working life

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 3
 

France Seen by...

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 4
 

Mediamania

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme
 

Act 1, 2 & 3

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.        Berthet, Annie, Catherine Hugot et al. Alter Ego + A2. Paris : Hachette, 2012

2.      Gonnet, Georges. Molière- Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme .Paris : Hachette, 1971

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Lichet, Raymond., Puig Rosado. Ecrire à tout le monde. Paris : Hachette, 1980

2.      French websites like Bonjour de France, FluentU French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN321 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:

The detailed text book “Shambook” is a Khanda Kavya written by Jagdeesh Gupta. To improve the creative writing skills, Nibandh, Kahani and Kavitha lekhan are included.Bharathiya chitrakala is also a part of the syllabus to improve the knowledge aboutIndian paintings.

Course Objectives:

Students are exposed to different forms of poetry especially, Khanda Kavya. It will help them to understand the contemporary socio-political issues.By learning about the tradition of Indian painting and legendary painters of India , students get to know about the richness and culture  of the Indian paintings. Creative writing sharpens their thinking, analytical  and writing skills 

Learning Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing asynchronous session assignments and CIAs. ● CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry. ● CO3: Will be able to learn the different aspects of Official correspondence. ● CO4: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs. By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing assignments and CIAs

CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry.

CO3: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs

CO4: To understand the contributions of painters to Indian painting.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Shambooh
 

Khanda Kavya “Shambook” [Poetry] By:Jagdeesh Gupta. Pub: Raj Pal & Sons

 

Level of knowledge:Analitical    

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Creative writing
 

Nibandh lekhan, Katha lekhan, Kavitha lekhan.

Level of knowledge:Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Bharathiya chithrakala -parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav, vikas aur pramukh shailiyam

pramukh kalakar-1.M F Hussain 2.Ravindranath Tagore 3.Raja Ravi Varma 4.Jamini Roy.

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Khanda Kavya”Shambook[Poetry] ByJagdeesh Gupta.Pub: Raj Pal & Sons
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.1. Sugam Hindi Vyakaran – Prof. Vamsidhar and Dharampal Shastry, SikshaBharathi,New Delh

2. Essentials of Screen writing: The art, craft and business of film and television writing

By: Walter Richard.

3. Writing and Script: A very short introduction

By: Robinson, Andrew.

4 .Creative writing By John Singleton

5. Adhunik  Hindi Nibandh By Bhuvaneshwarichandran Saksena.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-wikipedia)

CIA-2(Mid sem examination)

CIA-3(wikipedia article creation)

End semester examination

KAN321 - KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Language Kannada is offered to students of third Semester BA/B.Sc as Second language for fifty marks. Students of this semester will study an anthology of Modern Kannada Poetry and an Autobiography of Laxman Gaikwad. This course prepares the students to understand the new era. At the dawn of the twentieth century, B.M. Srikantiah, regarded as the “Father of modern Kannada Literature”, called for a new era of writing original works in modern Kannada while moving away from archaic Kannada forms. Students will study modern Kannada poetry from B.M.Sri to Dalit poet Dr. Siddalingiah. An anthology of modern poetry is selected to understand the beauty of modern Kannada poets through their writings. Uchalya is an autobiographical novel that carries the memories of Laxman Gaikwad right from his childhood till he became an adult. Laxman Gaikwad took birth in a criminal tribe of India belonging to Orissa/ Maharastra. The original text is translated to Kannada by Chandrakantha Pokale.

 

Course Objectives:

Understand and appreciate poetry as a literary art form.

Analyse the various elements of Poetry, such as diction, tone, form, genre, imagery, symbolism, theme, etc.

Appreciates to  learn the elements of autobiography.

Learning Outcome

CO 1: Able to define autobiography

CO2: Outline a personal autobiography

CO3: Delineate different types of autobiography

CO 4: Proficiency in communication skills

CO5 : Understand the principles of translation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Modern Kannada Poetry
 

1. Kariheggadeya Magalu- B.M.Sri

2. Hunnime Ratri- Kuvempu

3. Anna Yagna-Bendre

4.Mankuthimmana Kagga-D.V.G

5.Ikkala- K.S. Narasimha Swamy

6. Kannad padgol- G.P.Rajarathnam

7.Hanathe hachchuttene- G.S.S

8.Adugemane Hudugi-Vaidehi

9. Nehru Nivruttaraguvudilla- Adgaru

10. Nanna Janagalu.-Siddalingaiah

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Autobiography- Uchalya- Lakshman Gayekwad (Marathi)
 

Text: Uchalya

Author:Lakshman Gayekwad

Translation: Chandrakantha Pokle

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Creative Writings
 

 

1 Dialogue Writing

2 Essay writing

3 short story building

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. English Geethegalu- Sri, Publishers: B.M.Sri Smarka Prathistana, Bangalore-19 (2013)

2. Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Volumes 1-4, Editor: G. S. Shivarudrappa, Prasaranga, Bangalore Univeristy.

3. Hosagannada Kavitheya Mele English Kavyada Prabhava- S. Ananthanarayana

4. Hosagannadada Arunodaya- Srinivasa  Havanuru

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Hosagannda Sahitya- L.S. Sheshagiri Rao

2. Kannada Sahitya Sameekshe- G. S. Shivarudrappa

3. Bhavageethe- Dr. S. Prabhushankara

4. My Experiments with Truth- M.K. Gandhi

5. Ouru Keri- Siddalingaiah

Evaluation Pattern
 
Evaluation Pattern
 

CIA-1 Wikipedia Assignments- 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Wikipedia Assignment-20 Marks

Attendance -10 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

 
   

POL331 - INDIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To introduce students to the nature, structure and working of the Indian Political System.
  • To introduce students to The dynamics of the Indian Political System and the Contemporary issues
  • To initiate students in to research in Political Science

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate theoretical and analytical aptitude for studying and analyzing Indian Political System.

CO2: Apply history to analyse the emergence and evolution of the Indian Constitution.

CO3: Evaluate the trajectory of various socio-politico movements in India.

CO4: Predicting emerging challenges of the contemporary Indian Political System.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Framing of the Constitution
 

Historical Evolution of Indian Constitution, 1909, 1919, 1935 and 1947 Acts,

Role of Constituent Assembly. Preamble –Philosophy of the Constitution. Salient Features.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Key Concepts
 

Constitutionalism, Rule of law and Separation of Powers.

Fundamental Rights, Fundamental Duties & Directive Principles of State Policy.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:17
Organs of Government
 

Legislature: Parliament, Law-making process, Parliamentary Committees, State legislature.

Executive: President, Vice President and Prime Minister, Council of Ministers, Governor, Chief Minister. Parliamentary and Presidential forms of Government: A debate.

 

Judiciary: Supreme Court and High Court: Organization and Jurisdiction, Judicial Review. Judicial Activism. Public Interest Litigation, Judicial Reforms.

 

Constitutional Bodies: Election Commission of India, Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) of India, Finance Commission, Public Service Commissions.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:14
Union and State Relations
 

Unitary and Federal features, Legislative, Administrative and Financial Relations. State Autonomy debate, Sarkaria Commission recommendations. Constitutional Amendment process- Methods, 24, 25, 42, 44, 52, 73 and 74th Amendments.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Key Issues and Research in Indian politics
 

Secularism, Communalism, Social Justice, Regional Disparities, Right to Information & National Integration. Political Prties, Pressure Groups and Public Opinion.

Enquiries in to Indian politics, Empirical and Normative methods of research, formulating research problem and questions.

India’s response to climate change

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Fadia, B.L. (2013),  Indian Government and Politics. Agra: SahityaBhawan.

2.      Ghai, K.K. (2012), Indian Government and Politics, Noida: Kalyani.

3.      Bakshi, P.M. (2012). The Constitution of India. New Delhi: Universal Law.

4.      Kashyap, S.C. (2011). Our Constitution. New Delhi: National Book Trust.

5.      Basu ,D.D  (2008) Introduction to Indian Constitution. Eastern Books

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Anand, C.L. (2008). Constitutional Law and History of Government of India. New Delhi: Universal Law.

2.      Pylee, M.V. (2012). Constitutional Amendments in India. New Delhi: Universal Law. Constituent Assembly Debates. New Delhi: Lok Sabha Secretariat.

3.      Kashyap, S.C. and Kashyap, A. (2012). Indian Presidency: Constitution Law and Practice. New Delhi: Universal Law.

4.      Prasad, A. and Singh, C.P. (2012). Judicial Power and Judicial Review. Lucknow: Eastern Book Company. Hassan, Z. (Ed.) (2006). Parties and Party Politics in India. New Delhi: OUP.

5.      Kumar, B.V. (2009). Electoral reforms in India: Current Discourses, Jaipur.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

 

CIA 1

10%

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

CIA 3

10%

Attendance

05%

SAN321 - SANSKRIT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Sundara Kanda is the only chapter of the Ramayana in which the hero is not Rama, but rather Hanuman. The work depicts the adventures of Hanuman and his selflessness, strength, and devotion to Rama are emphasized in the text. Bhoja only wrote 5 kāṇdas (up to the Sundarakāṇda), and there is a story about this: that he was inspired to write this work the night before a battle, that as he finished the Sundarakāṇda it was time to go, and that he announced that the Yuddhakāṇda would be enacted in the battlefield against the invader, but sadly he never returned. Others have composed a Yuddhakāṇda to complete the work.

The main objective of the students is to understand the champu Kavyas based on the sam.  

The Origin and development of the Champu.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To analyse the content of the text in detail with examples

CO2: To Deliberate the classification and characters of the epic

CO3: To understand the delight of the text.

CO4: To demonstrate an increased ability to read and understand Sanskrit texts

CO5: To understand the prefixes and suffixes and changing the sentences in grammar.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:35
champu
 

Origin and developmetn of Champu kavyas

Five Important Champus

Level of knowledge: Basic/conceptual/ Analytical

Shlokas 1 -60 Hnumantha¨s voyage to Lanka and searching for Seetha Description of city Lanka , Characters of Champu Kavya 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Grammar
 

Prayogas and Krudantha

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Language skills
 

Translation of Given passage from English to Sanskrit 

Writing composition in sanskrit on the given topic in Sanskrit

Text Books And Reference Books:

Sundarakanda from Bhaja´s Champu Ramayana 

Chitrakalayaa: ugagamam vikaasam ca

origin and development of painting through Vedas and Puranas

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

   

Reference Books:-

 

1)      Sundarakanda from “Champuramayana of Bhoja  

2)      Sanskrit Grammar by M.R. Kale.

3)       History of Sanskrit literature by Dr.M.S. Shivakumaraswamy.

4)       History of Sanskrit literature by Krishnamachari.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 Wikipedia assignment

CIA 2 mid semester examination

CIA 3 Wikipedia assignment

SOC331 - CLASSICAL SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course introduces students to (a) the meaning, nature, scope, types and relevance of sociological theories in understanding the society (b) the social and intellectual context in which Sociology emerged as a discipline, and (b) the works of forefathers viz., Comte, Spencer, Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, and highlighting the centrality of their theoretical and methodological contributions in the consequent development of Sociology as a discipline. It is intended to provide solid foundation on these classical thinkers, as this is the foundation on which the entire Sociological theory is constructed. 

Course Objectives:  

  • This course is designed to acquaint students with the thought of the founders of sociology
  • It offers a historical background within which sociological theories have emerged
  • It helps to develop critical thoughts and assessment of sociological theory 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Discuss the context in which Sociology as a discipline and sociological theories emerged.

CO2: Analyze the significance of sociological theories in everyday life

CO3: To apply sociological theories to analyze social realities

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Sociological Theories
 

 

  1. Sociological Theory: Meaning, Characteristics and Functions
  2. Types: Grand Theory – Micro, Macro Theories and Middle Range Theories
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Auguste Comte & Herbert Spencer
 
  1. Auguste Comte: Subject matter of Sociology; The Law of Three Stages; Positivism; Classification of Sciences; Social Statics and Dynamics and Religion of Humanity
  2. Herbert Spencer: Organismic concept of Society; Theory of Evolution & Social Darwinism
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Emile Durkheim
 
  1. Social Order; Social Facts; Rules of Sociological Method; Social Solidarity; Theory of Suicide; Division of Labour; Sociology of Religion
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Karl Marx
 
  1. Interpretation of History: Concept of History - Stages of Human History; Dialectical Method; Economic Determinism – Theory of Surplus Value; Alienation; Theory of Class and Class Struggle 
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Max Weber
 
  1. Definition of Sociology; Verstehen Approach; Social Action; Ideal Types; Authority; Protestant Ethics and the Spirit of Capitalism; Bureaucracy
Text Books And Reference Books:

Abraham, F.A. (1982). Modern Sociological Theory. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Allan, K. (3rded.). (2012). Explorations in Classical Sociological Theory: Seeing the Social World. California: Sage Publications. 

Bottomore, T, & Nisbet. A History of Sociological Analysis. London: Heinemann, 

Collins, R. (1997). Theoretical Sociology. Jaipur: Rawat.

Giddens, A.  (1971). Capitalism and Modern Sociological Theory: An Analysis of Marx, Durkheim, and Max Weber. Cambridge: Oxford University Press.

Mills, C. W. (2000).The Sociological Imagination. New York: Oxford University Press.

Nisbet, R.A. (1976). The Sociological Tradition. London: Heinemann.

Ritzer, G. (2011). Sociological Theory. New Delhi: McGraw Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Skidmore, W. (1975). Theoretical Thinking in Sociology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Stones, R. (1998). Key Sociological Thinkers. London: Macmillan.

Turner, J H. (1987). The Structure of Sociological Theory. Jaipur: Rawat.

Zeitlin, I.M. (1996). Rethinking Sociology: A Critique of Contemporary Theory. Delhi: Sage.

Evaluation Pattern

Students wil be evaluated through Continuous Internal Assessment and End Semester Exam.

 

CIA pattern

CIA constitutes a total of 50 marks for a five-credit paper. The distribution is as follows 

CIA I - CIA I carries 10 marks and involves the adoption of any one or two of the following methods: written Assignment, Book/Article review, group presentations, symposium, group task, Individual seminars, Quiz, and class test.   

CIA II - Mid semester Examination conducted for a total weightage of 25 marks

CIA III - CIA III also carries 10 marks and involves the adoption of any one or two of the above said methods. 

Attendance - Attendance carries 5 marks 

  

ESE pattern

Section 1 5 x 6 = 30 

This section will have a total of six questions with a mix of compulsory and internal choice to be answered. Each question carries FIVE marks and hence a total of 50 Marks. This section will have smaller essay questions, with a little of analyses and concepts. 

Section II 10 x 4 = 40 

This section will have a total of four questions with a mix of compulsory and internal choice to be asnwered. Each question carries TEN marks and hence a total of 40 Marks. 

Section III 15 x 2 = 30 

This section will have a total of two questions with one compulsory and one internal choiceto be answered. Each question carries FIFTEEN marks and hence a total of 30 Marks. 

TAM321 - TAMIL (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Araillakiyam, bakthi illakiyam, ikala illakiyamn the major allakiyams.The influence myths and puranas are delineated through the good deeds for a better lifestyle.The  Cultural Studies part will have an overview of Indian painting both traditional and modern with special reference to mythology and literature

India 2020- Abdul Kalam

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Recall and categorize the concepts of literature.

CO2: Understand the true essence of the texts, and inculcate them in their daily lives.

CO3: Recognize and apply the moral values and ethics in their learning.

CO4: Comprehend the concepts in literature and appreciate the literary text.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Ara illakiyam
 

1. Thirukural

2. Avvai kural

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bhakthi illakiyam
 

1. Thiru vasagam

2. Kambar andhadhi

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ik kaala illakiyam
 

Naatu pura padalgal

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Prose
 

India 2020- Dr. Abdul Kalam

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Common Topic and visual text
 

1. Common topic: Oviyam

2. Visual text : nattupuviyal

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Grammer
 

Sollu illakanam

Text Books And Reference Books:

Thirukkural-Bhoombugar pathipagam- puliyur kesigan urai, Chennai- 08

Kammbarin Ainthu noolgal- Vanathi pathupagam- Dr. R. Rajagopalachariyar,  Chennai- 18

Nathu pura illakiyam- Ki Va jaganathan- malai aruvi- Monarch achagam- chennai

India 2020- APJ Abdul kalam- puthaiyuram aandugaluku aga oru thoali nooku,  New century book house, chennai

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Thirukkural-Bhoombugar pathipagam- puliyur kesigan urai, Chennai- 08

Kammbarin Ainthu noolgal- Vanathi pathupagam- Dr. R. Rajagopalachariyar,  Chennai- 18

Nathu pura illakiyam- Ki Va jaganathan- malai aruvi- Monarch achagam- chennai

India 2020- APJ Abdul kalam- puthaiyuram aandugaluku aga oru thoali nooku,  New century book house, chennai

Tamizhar nattup padagal - N Vanamamalai, New century book house, Chennai

 

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

EXAMINATION AND ASSIGNMENTS: There is a continuous evaluation both at the formal and informal levels. The language skills and the ability to evaluate a text will be assessed

This paper will have a total of 50 marks shared equally by End Semester Exam (ESE) and Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) While the ESE is based on theory the CIA will assess the students' critical thinking, leadership qualities, language skills and creativity



AEN421 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is taught in the second year for students from different streams, namely BA, BSc and B Com. If the first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian voices in English and Indian regional literatures in translation for the Additional English students of the first year, the second year syllabus intends to take that project a little further and open up the engagement of the students to texts from across the world. The syllabus - selection of texts will concentrate on readings from South Asian, Latin American, Australian, Canadian, and Afro-American. It will voice subaltern concerns of identity, gender, race, ethnicity and problems of belongingness experienced by humanity all over the globe.

The syllabus will extend the concerns of nation and nationality and marginalization, discussed within the Indian context to a more inclusive and wider global platform. We have consciously kept out ‘mainstream’ writers and concentrated on the voices of the subalterns from across the world. There is an implicit recognition in this project that though the aspects of marginalization and the problems facing subalterns are present across cultures and nations, the experiences, expressions and reflections are specific to each race and culture. The course will address these nuances and specificities and enable our students to become more aware and sensitive to life and reality around them. This will equip the students, who are global citizens, to understand not just the Indian scenario, but also situate themselves within the wider global contexts and understand the spaces they will move into and negotiate in their future.

 

There is a prescribed text book Blends: Voices from Margins for the second year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation. 

The course objectives are

·         to introduce the students to look at different cultures through Literature

·         to help students develop an understanding of subaltern realities and identity politics

·         to inculcate literary sensibility/taste among students across disciplines

·         to improve language skills –speaking, reading, writing and listening

·         to equip the students with tools for developing lateral thinking

·         to equip students with critical reading and thinking habits

·         to enable them to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of subaltern writing, of which this compilation is just a glimpse 

·         to actively engage with the world as a cultural and social space (to be facilitated through proactive CIAs which help students to interact and engage with the realities they face everyday and have come across in these texts)

·         to learn and appreciate India and its place in the world through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts

 

·         to reiterate the study skills and communication skills they developed in the previous year and extend it.  

Learning Outcome

CO1 : CO1: To understand the socio- political concerns in various literatures through short stories, poems and essays

CO2: CO2: To critically read and articulate the non- canonised literatures

CO3: CO3: To analyse and apply these textual themes in a multi- cultural, global and professional space

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Novella
 

Unit 1: Novella

·         Viktor Frankl: “Man’s Search for Meaning”(Excerpts)                                       

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Short Stories
 

Short Story                                                                                                    

·         Anton Chekov: “The Avenger”

·         Chinua Achebe: “Marriage is a Private Affair”

·         Nadine Gordimer: “Train from Rhodesia”

 

·         Wakako Yamuchai: “And the Soul Shall Dance”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Poetry
 

Poetry                                                                                                             12 hrs

·         Octavio Paz: “As One Listens to the Rain”

·         Jamaica Kincaid: “Girl”

·         Derek Walcott: “A Far Cry from Africa”    

 

·         Joseph Brodsky: “Freedom”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Essays
 

·         Alice Walker: Excerpts from “In Search of My Mother’s Gardens”

·         Hannah Arendt: “Men in Dark Times”

Dalai Lama Nobel Acceptance Speech

 

 

 

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blends Book II

Viktor Frankl's "Man's Search for Meaning"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Elie Wiesel "Night"

Diary of Anne Frank

Famous Nobel Lectures

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  A written test for 20 marks. It can be an Open Book test, a classroom assignment, an objective or descriptive test pertaining to the texts and ideas discussed in class.  

CIA2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 works

 

CIA 3: This is to be a creative test/ project in small groups by students. They may do Collages, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes, presentations, debates, charts or any other creative test for 20 marks. This test should allow the students to explore their creativity and engage with the real world around them and marks can be allotted to students depending on how much they are able to link the ideas and discussions in the texts to the world around them.

ECO431 - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of this paper is to provide students with strong foundation in the principles of international economics which will help them to know the trade policies at the national and international levels and the impact of the globalization on income, employment and social standards in the current international scenario. The paper also covers the pure theory of trade and extensions thereof, customs union, and balance of payments adjustment policies under alternative exchange-rate regimes including the determination of the exchange rate.

Learning Outcome

CO1: gain a strong foundation in the principles of international economics.

CO2: be able to know the trade policies at the national and international levels and the impact of globalization on income, employment and social standards in the current international scenario.

CO3: gain an understanding of the trade policies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction and Essentials
 

The Subject Matter of International Economics; Trade Based on Absolute Advantage; Trade Based on Comparative Advantage; Comparative Advantage and Opportunity Costs; Empirical Tests of the Ricardian Model.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
The Standard Theory of International Trade, Offer Curves and the Terms of Trade
 

The Basis for and the Gains from Trade with Increasing Costs; Trade Based on Differences in Tastes; The Equilibrium Relative Commodity Price with Trade – Partial Equilibrium Analysis; Offer Curves; General Equilibrium Analysis; the terms of trade.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
The Heckscher - Ohlin Theory, Economies of Scale, Imperfect Competition and International Trade