Department of
PSYCHOLOGY






Syllabus for
Bachelor of Arts (Music, Psychology, English)
Academic Year  (2023)

 
3 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN321 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG323 CREATIVE WRITING 3 3 100
EST331 AMERICAN LITERATURES 5 4 100
FRN321 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN321 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN321 KANNADA 3 03 50
MUS331 HARMONY - I 2 2 100
MUS341A PIANO LITERATURE - I 2 2 100
MUS341B OPERA LITERATURE-I 2 2 100
MUS351A MAJOR IN PIANO - III 1 1 100
MUS351B COLLABORATIVE PIANO III 1 1 100
MUS352A MAJOR IN VOICE III 1 1 70
MUS352B COLLABORATIVE VOICE III 1 1 100
PSY332 SOCIOCULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR 5 5 100
PSY352 PERSONAL GROWTH 2 2 100
SAN321 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM321 TAMIL 3 3 100
4 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN421 ADDITIONAL ENGLISH 3 3 100
ENG423 WRITING FOR MEDIA 3 3 100
EST431 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY 5 4 100
FRN421 FRENCH 3 3 100
HIN421 HINDI 3 3 100
KAN421 KANNADA 3 03 50
MUS431 HARMONY - II 2 2 100
MUS441A PIANO LITERATURE - II 2 2 100
MUS441B OPERA LITERATURE - II 2 2 100
MUS451A MAJOR IN PIANO - IV 1 1 100
MUS451B COLLABORATIVE PIANO IV 1 1 100
MUS452A MAJOR IN VOICE IV 1 1 100
MUS452B COLLABORATIVE VOICE IV 1 1 100
PSY432 LIFE-SPAN DEVELOPMENT 5 5 100
PSY452 PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTS 2 2 100
SAN421 SANSKRIT 3 3 100
TAM421 TAMIL 3 3 100
5 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST531 POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURES 4 04 100
EST532 INDIAN LITERATURES: THEMES AND CONCERNS 5 4 100
MUS531 HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC - I 2 2 100
MUS541A MUSIC PEDAGOGY - I 2 2 100
MUS541B CHOIR CONDUCTING TECHNIQUES - I 2 2 100
MUS551A MAJOR IN PIANO - V 1 1 100
MUS551B COLLABORATIVE PIANO V 1 1 100
MUS552A MAJOR IN VOICE V 1 1 100
MUS552B COLLABORATIVE VOICE V 1 1 100
PSY531 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY532 THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS-I 4 4 100
PSY551 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-I 2 2 100
6 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Paper Code
Paper
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
EST631 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURES 5 4 100
EST631E ECOLOGICAL DISCOURSES AND PRACTICES 4 4 100
EST641A CULTURAL STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641B INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING 4 04 100
EST641C INTRODUCTION TO SHORT STORY 4 04 100
EST641D INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES 4 04 100
EST641F REVISITING INDIAN EPICS 4 4 100
MUS631 HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC - II 2 2 100
MUS641A MUSIC PEDAGOGY-II 2 2 100
MUS641B CHOIR CONDUCTING TECHNIQUES-II 2 2 100
MUS651A MAJOR IN PIANO - VI 1 1 100
MUS651B COLLABORATIVE PIANO VI 1 1 100
MUS652A MAJOR IN VOICE VI 1 1 100
MUS652B COLLABORATIVE VOICE VI 1 1 100
PSY632 THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS-II 4 4 100
PSY641A POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641B MEDIA PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641C ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE 4 4 100
PSY641D CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR 4 4 100
PSY641E INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY641F HEALTH AND WELLBEING 4 4 100
PSY641G COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY 4 4 100
PSY651 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH METHODS AND ASSESSMENT-II 2 2 100

AEN321 - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course is taught in the second year for students from different streams, namely BA, BSc

 

and BCom. If the first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ

 

University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian voices in English and Indian

 

regional literatures in translation for the Additional English students of the first year, the

 

second year syllabus intends to take that project a little further and open up the engagement

 

of the students to texts from across the world. The syllabus - selection of texts will

 

concentrate on readings from South Asian, Latin American, Australian, Canadian, and Afro-

 

American. It will voice subaltern concerns of identity, gender, race, ethnicity and problems of

 

belongingness experienced by humanity all over the globe.

 

The syllabus will extend the concerns of nation and nationality and marginalization,

 

discussed within the Indian context to a more inclusive and wider global platform. We have

 

consciously kept out ‘mainstream’ writers and concentrated on the voices of the subalterns

 

from across the world. There is an implicit recognition in this project that though the aspects

 

of marginalization and the problems facing subalterns are present across cultures and

 

nations, the experiences, expressions and reflections are specific to each race and culture.

 

The course will address these nuances and specificities and enable our students to become

 

more aware and sensitive to life and reality around them. This will equip the students, who

 

are global citizens, to understand not just the Indian scenario, but also situate themselves

 

within the wider global contexts and understand the spaces they will move into and negotiate

 

in their future.

 

There is a prescribed text book Blends: Voices from Margins for the second year students,

 

compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

Course Objectives

 

The course objectives are

 

 to enable students to look at different cultures through Literature

 

 to help students develop an understanding of subaltern realities and identity politics

 

 to inculcate literary sensibility/taste among students across disciplines

 

 to improve language skills –speaking, reading, writing and listening

 

 to equip the students with tools for developing lateral thinking

 

 to equip students with critical reading and thinking habits

 

 to reiterate the study skills and communication skills they developed in the previous

 

year and extend it.

Learning Outcome

CO1: it will enable students to understand and analyse the nuances of cultures, ethnicities and other diversity around them and become sensitive towards them.

CO2 : They will be able to critique literature from a cultural, ethical, social and political perspectives

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Children?s Novel
 

TetsukoKuroyanagi: Tottochan: The Little Girl at the Window12

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Short Story
 

Liliana Heker : “The Stolen Party

 

 Higuchi Ichiyo: “Separate Ways”

 

 Harukki Murakami "Birthday Girl"

 

 Luisa Valenzuela: “I’m your Horse in the Night”

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Poetry
 

Poetry 12 Hrs

 

 Silvio Curbelo: “Summer Storm”

 

 Nancy Morejon: “Black Woman”

 

 Ruben Dario: “To Roosevelt”

 

 Mina Asadi: “A Ring to me is a Bondage”

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Essay
 

Essay 9Hrs

 

 Amy Tan: “Mother Tongue

 

 Linda Hogan: “Waking Up the Rake”

 

 Isabelle Allande: “Open Veins of Latin America”

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blends Book II

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Oxford Encyclopeadia on Latin American History

Children's Literature -  Kimberley Reynolds (CUP)

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

CIA 1: A written test for 20 marks. It can be an Open Book test, a classroom assignment, an

 

objective or descriptive test pertaining to the texts and ideas discussed in class.

 

CIA2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 works

 

CIA 3: This is to be a creative test/ project in small groups by students. They may do

 

Collages, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes, presentations, debates,

 

charts or any other creative test for 20 marks. This test should allow the students to explore

 

their creativity and engage with the real world around them and marks can be allotted to

 

students depending on how much they are able to link the ideas and discussions in the texts

 

to the world around them.

 

Question Paper Pattern

 

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

 

Section A: 4x5= 20

 

Section B: 2x15=30

 

Total 50

 

End Semester Exam: 3 hrs

 

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

 

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

 

Total 50

ENG323 - CREATIVE WRITING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

An introduction to the craft of creative writing, this paper offers an engagement with literary conventions as well as the writing techniques and tools essential to effective composition and editing.

Learning Outcome

CO 1: To engage with writing as a verbal visual craft

CO 2 : To develop a visual verbal vocabulary

CO 3 : to locate writing in a regional context and situate it in a global discourse

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:45
Topics
 

1)Narrativising Time: calibrating time through alternate modes of expression.

Instructions: Write a paragraph that captures the passage of time. Do not use conventional markers and instruments that mark the passage of time like calendars, watches, clocks.

Tip: Observe objects and their relation with time. Describe the changes you notice.

2) Writing about Space:

Instructions: Using your bodily experience, in a few lines describe being caged, then describe being alone in a vast open desert like space. Avoid conventional words that describe space like measurements or volumes.

Tip: Observe and describe the effect spatiality has on you in terms of feelings and perceptions.

3) Ekphrasis: Describing a work of visual art:

Choose a famous work of art and narrativise it.

Tip: avoid historical, biographical or compositional facts. Study the work and imagine the moments or situations that preceded what is depicted.

4)Pecha Kucha (Sequencing):

Instructions: using 20 slides with a six second transition per slide, narrativise the story that will lead to the LAST slide being the painting chosen by you for the previous exercise.

Tip: keep slides minimal. Avoid heavy text or images. Use a visual colour palette and design mode that aligns, complements or contrasts with your last slide (the painting). Choose a font, background colour and images to suit your narrative tone. Be sensitive to cultural moorings and milieu.

5) Perspectives/ Point of View

Instructions: Choose a popular legend or fairy tale or nursery rhyme. Retell it from the point of view of a minor character or object. Example: retell Cinderella from the point of view of the slipper or the coach man.

Tip: the plot must remain the same but the perspective will define the tone and telling thereof.

 

6) Analogy

Instructions: Write a brief analogy: 2-5 lines only. You may use a metaphor, simile, conceit, anecdote etc.

Tip: Try to find culture specific and contextual examples. feel free to draw from your own cultural and linguistic experiences. Provide adequate translation and context. Write in English only.

 

7)Artistic Manifesto

Instructions: write a page describing your emerging idea of artistic writing from your experiences with the writing exercises you have hitherto done.

Tip:  You may feel the need to align your style and voice within a tradition. Describe and appraise that tradition and locate yourself within it.

 

8 a) Material Memory:

Instructions: Find any household artefact or family heirloom of emotional value and trace its significance within your family.

Tip: trace its ownership, try to find to the source, have a conversation with someone who has a story about it, happy or otherwise. Observe the artefact and the response it evokes in the narrator. Try to supplement your writing with a photo or illustration.

8 b) Cultural expression:

Instructions: In conversation with your family, identify a favourite proverb, insult, threat, joke that has been repeated over the years. What does it mean? What is its intention? How do some of its elements capture the sense of region and community. For example, the donkey is often vilified as a beast of stubbornness and stupidity in Tamil folklore. It is also an affectionate term of rebuke by elders and is inoffensive yet stinging. It is a character often central to proverb and folktale alike as well as good natured insults.

9) Ballad: Story poems with clear conventions

Instructions: write a ballad using the conventions discussed in class.

10) Haiku:

Instructions: Write a sequence of haiku reflecting a season.

Tip: The haiku must have a seasonal marker (kigo), cutting word (kiregi) and adhere to the conventions of Imagism, avoiding primary speech cohesion.

 

11) Proposal for ESE Portfolio:

Instruction: Defend your choice of form. Mention why you are choosing it and what literary significance it enjoys.

12) Review of Literature:

Instructions: Select upto 5 pieces of writing by well known authors who are renowned for their contribution to that form. Write a brief review of their work, its impact on your imagination and how you intend to align yourself in their tradition.

13) Final Submission

Instructions: Draft your Final Submission. Have a friend review it. Edit and experiment with presentation.

14) Conceptualise the design and layout of your final submission. Write a paragraph on your design concept. Even if you choose to submit an unadorned manuscript, validate this decision.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Amis, Kingsley, ed, The New Oxford Book of Light Verse , Oxford University Press,, London, 1978.

Bradley, Margaret. Ed, More Poetry Please! JM Dent & Sons,Great Britain,1988.

 

Fry, Stephen , The Ode less Travelled , Random House , UK

Lowenstein Tom, ed Classic Haiku: The Great Japanese Poetry from Basho, Buson, Issa, Shiki and their followers, Duncan Baird Publishers, London

 

Palgrave, Francis Turner Palgrave's Golden Treasury with Additional Poems, Oxford University Press, London, 1908

Reid, Ian, The Critical Idiom: The Short Story, Methuen& Co. London

 

Stepp, Carl Sessions. Writing as Craft and Magic, Oxford University Press, New York,2007

Thayil, Jeet, ed,60 Indian Poets, Penguin Random House , India ,2008

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Will be provided by the instructor

Evaluation Pattern

This course has 10 internal assignments which are graded continuously for 50 marks.

Students will be graded for compliance with assignment instructions.

The End Semester Assessment will be a portfolio submission (50 marks).

There is no CIA or Mid Semester examination.

EST331 - AMERICAN LITERATURES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

  • To introduce the students to the socio-political, religious and cultural aspects of America through literary texts
  • To enable students to  read texts as products of  historical, political and cultural context
  • To provide insights into different styles of writing over different centuries
  • To encourage clear understanding of different genres and prosody/forms/literary devices.
  • To enable learners to give their perspective on the texts prescribed
  • To brainstorm learners to use their knowledge of History, Psychology, Sociology, etc to read literary works

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify different influences on American literature & Provide an account of European colonization of American

CO2: Demonstrate a familiarity with native America literature

CO3: Use American history to analyze different pieces of American literature

CO4: Trace the development of American literature through different eras

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Beginnings to 1700
 

Description: This unit will introduce American History and literature. An outline of important events would be briefed.

  • The Navajo Creation Story
  • John Smith- The New Land
  • Anne Bradstreet – In Honour of that Highness
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
1700-1820
 

Description: This unit will move further into specific texts relevant to the century and sensitize learners in that direction. 

  • Doctor Richard Shuckburgh- Yankee Doodle (popular version)
  • Benjamin Franklin- Rules by which a Great Empire...
  • Sarah Wentworth Morton- Stanzas to a Husband Recently United
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:25
1820- 1900
 

Description: This unit will provide a variety in terms of different kinds of literature that the particular century has produced and provide contexts as and when required

  • James Lowell- Stanzas on Freedom
  • Washington Irving- Rip Van Winkle
  • Emerson- I Become a Transparent Eyeball/Brahma
  • Hawthorne- Young Goodman Brown
  • Martin Luther King- I have a Dream (speech)
  • Longfellow- My Lost youth
  • Douglas- What the Black Man Wants
  • Whitman- A noiseless Patient Spider
  • Dickinson- I years had been from Home
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe- Excerpts- Uncle Tom’s Cabin
  • Kate Chopin- Lilacs
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
1900-1945
 

Description: This unit will provide a variety in terms of different kinds of literature that the particular century has produced and provide contexts as and when required.

  • Hemingway- The Snows of Kilimanjaro
  • Frost- Meeting and Passing
  • Ezra Pound- An Immorality
  • Langston Hughes- Daybreak in Alabama
  • Fitzgerald- The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
  • Cummings- Even a Pencil has Fear to
  • Ginsberg- Howl or A Supermarket in California
  • Eugene O Neill- The Emperor Jones or Hairy Ape
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
1945- Contemporary
 

Description: This unit will introduce war and the effect of it on the minds of American writers and the society. It will also take the learners through different styles of writing.

  • Alice Walker- The Color Purple
  • Sylvia Plath- Gold Mouths Cry
  • William Burroughs- Naked Lunch
  • James Thurber- A Couple of Hamburgers
Text Books And Reference Books:

Text compiled for internal circulation

Essential Reading

  1. Roger Williams: from A Key into the Language of America
  2. Anne Bradstreet: from Contemplations
  3. Context: Cultures in Contact: Voices from Anglo-American’s “New” World (17C)]
  4. Sarah Kemble Knight (1666-1727)
  5. The journal of Madame Knight
  6. Context: Tradition and Change in Anglo-America
  7. Philip Freneau (1752-1832)
  8. The Indian Student or Force of Nature
  9. Washington Irving (1783-1859)
  10. From A History of New York
  11. James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851)
  12. From The Last of the Mohicans
  13. William Apess (1798-?)
  14. An Indian’s Looking-Glass for the White Man
  15. Context: Indian Voices
  16. Herman Melville (1819-1891)
  17. TheParadise of Bachelors and The Tartarus of Maids
  18. Sarah Margaret Fuller (1810-1850)
  19. From Woman in the Nineteenth Century
  20. From American Literature; Its position in the present time, and prospects for the future
  21. Sojourner Truth (1797
  22. Address to the first Annual Meeting of the American Equal Rights Association
  23. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911)
  24. The colored people in America
  25. Context: Literature and the “Woman Question”
  26. Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo (1808-1890)
  27. An account of the Gold Rush
  28. Context: Voices from the Southwest
  29. Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney (1791-1865)
  30. The suttee
  31. Sherwood Anderson
  32. From Winesburg, Ohio
  33. John Dos Passos
  34. From U.S.A
  35. Elizabeth Bishop
  36. In the waiting room
  37. Tennessee Williams
  38. Portrait of a Madonna
  39. Sylvia Plath
  40. Lady Lazarus
  41. Robert Lowell
  42. Skunk hour
  43. Alice Walker
  44. The child who favoured daughter
  45. Adrienne Rich
  46. Upper Broadway
  47. Gary Snyder
  48. Sixth-month song in the foothills
  49. Vladimir Nabokov
  50. From Lolita
  51. Ralph Ellison
  52. From Invisible Man
  53. Thomas Pynchon
  54. Entropy
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

  1. Abel, Darrel. American Literature, Volume 1: Colonial and Early National Writing, (ed)
  2. Abel, Darrel. American Literature, Volume 2: Literature of the Atlantic Culture, (ed) Abel, Darrel.
  3. Recent American Literature to 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs Lenthiel H, Volume 3; Barron’s Educational Series
  4. Recent American Literature After 1930, (ed) Heiney and Downs, Lenthiel H. Volume 4; Barron’s Educational Series
  5. Literary History of The United States:  (ed) Spiller, Thorp, Johnson, Canby, Ludwig, Third Edition: Revised; Amerind Publishing Co. Pvt. Ltd.
  6. The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume 1, Second Edition; (ed) Lauter, Yarborough et al, Heath
  7. The Harper American Literature, Compact Edition; (ed) McQuade, Atwan et al, Harper and Row
Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

 

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Individual or group work

20+20

50

                

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam

 Module

Section A

10 marks

Section B

20 marks

Module I

1

1

Module II

1

 

Module III

1

 

Module IV

 

 

 End Semester Exam

 Module

Section A

15 marks

Section B

20 marks

 

Module I

1

 

 

Module II

1

1

 

Module III

1

1

 

Module IV

1

 

 

 

Section A – 15x4 = 60

Section B – 20x2 = 40

The prescribed texts could form the subject matter of CIA 1 as well as CIA 3.

 

In particular, the texts could be extended to meet CIA 3 requirements.  

FRN321 - FRENCH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

French as second language for the Arts, Science and Commerce UG program

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to communicate with native speakers and make presentations on small topics

CO 2: Proficiency in literary analysis, appreciation and review of poems,play ,films and fables

CO3: Acquaintance of culture, civilization, social values and etiquettes, and gastronomical richness

CO 4: Ability to do formal and informal, oral and written communication.

CO 5: Overall knowledge on functional and communicative aspects and get through a2 level exams.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 1
 

To perform a tribute: artist, work, you are going to…..

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 2
 

Towards a working life

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 3
 

France Seen by...

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Dossier 4
 

Mediamania

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme
 

Act 1, 2 & 3

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.        Berthet, Annie, Catherine Hugot et al. Alter Ego + A2. Paris : Hachette, 2012

2.      Gonnet, Georges. Molière- Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme .Paris : Hachette, 1971

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Lichet, Raymond., Puig Rosado. Ecrire à tout le monde. Paris : Hachette, 1980

2.      French websites like Bonjour de France, FluentU French, Learn French Lab, Point du FLE etc.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment Pattern

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

CIA 1 – Assignments / Letter writing / Film review

10%

 

CIA 2 –Mid Sem Exam

25%

 

CIA 3 – Quiz / Role Play / Theatre / Creative projects 

10%

 

Attendance

05%

 

End Sem Exam

 

50%

Total

50%

50%

HIN321 - HINDI (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:

The detailed text book “Shambook” is a Khanda Kavya written by Jagdeesh Gupta. To improve the creative writing skills, Nibandh, Kahani and Kavitha lekhan are included.Bharathiya chitrakala is also a part of the syllabus to improve the knowledge aboutIndian paintings.

Course Objectives:

Students are exposed to different forms of poetry especially, Khanda Kavya. It will help them to understand the contemporary socio-political issues.By learning about the tradition of Indian painting and legendary painters of India , students get to know about the richness and culture  of the Indian paintings. Creative writing sharpens their thinking, analytical  and writing skills 

Learning Outcome

CO1: By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing asynchronous session assignments and CIAs. ● CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry. ● CO3: Will be able to learn the different aspects of Official correspondence. ● CO4: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs. By the end of the course the student should be able to: ● CO1: Improve their writing skill in literary Hindi by doing assignments and CIAs

CO2: Improve their analytical skills through critical analysis of the poetry.

CO3: To improve their basic research skills while doing the CIAs

CO4: To understand the contributions of painters to Indian painting.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Shambooh
 

Khanda Kavya “Shambook” [Poetry] By:Jagdeesh Gupta. Pub: Raj Pal & Sons

 

Level of knowledge:Analitical    

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Creative writing
 

Nibandh lekhan, Katha lekhan, Kavitha lekhan.

Level of knowledge:Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Bharathiya chithrakala -parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav, vikas aur pramukh shailiyam

pramukh kalakar-1.M F Hussain 2.Ravindranath Tagore 3.Raja Ravi Varma 4.Jamini Roy.

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Khanda Kavya”Shambook[Poetry] ByJagdeesh Gupta.Pub: Raj Pal & Sons
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

.1. Sugam Hindi Vyakaran – Prof. Vamsidhar and Dharampal Shastry, SikshaBharathi,New Delh

2. Essentials of Screen writing: The art, craft and business of film and television writing

By: Walter Richard.

3. Writing and Script: A very short introduction

By: Robinson, Andrew.

4 .Creative writing By John Singleton

5. Adhunik  Hindi Nibandh By Bhuvaneshwarichandran Saksena.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1(Digital learning-wikipedia)

CIA-2(Mid sem examination)

CIA-3(wikipedia article creation)

End semester examination

KAN321 - KANNADA (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:03

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Language Kannada is offered to students of third Semester BA/B.Sc as Second language for fifty marks. Students of this semester will study an anthology of Modern Kannada Poetry and an Autobiography of Laxman Gaikwad. This course prepares the students to understand the new era. At the dawn of the twentieth century, B.M. Srikantiah, regarded as the “Father of modern Kannada Literature”, called for a new era of writing original works in modern Kannada while moving away from archaic Kannada forms. Students will study modern Kannada poetry from B.M.Sri to Dalit poet Dr. Siddalingiah. An anthology of modern poetry is selected to understand the beauty of modern Kannada poets through their writings. Uchalya is an autobiographical novel that carries the memories of Laxman Gaikwad right from his childhood till he became an adult. Laxman Gaikwad took birth in a criminal tribe of India belonging to Orissa/ Maharastra. The original text is translated to Kannada by Chandrakantha Pokale.

 

Course Objectives:

Understand and appreciate poetry as a literary art form.

Analyse the various elements of Poetry, such as diction, tone, form, genre, imagery, symbolism, theme, etc.

Appreciates to  learn the elements of autobiography.

Learning Outcome

CO 1: Able to define autobiography

CO2: Outline a personal autobiography

CO3: Delineate different types of autobiography

CO 4: Proficiency in communication skills

CO5 : Understand the principles of translation

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Modern Kannada Poetry
 

1. Kariheggadeya Magalu- B.M.Sri

2. Hunnime Ratri- Kuvempu

3. Anna Yagna-Bendre

4.Mankuthimmana Kagga-D.V.G

5.Ikkala- K.S. Narasimha Swamy

6. Kannad padgol- G.P.Rajarathnam

7.Hanathe hachchuttene- G.S.S

8.Adugemane Hudugi-Vaidehi

9. Nehru Nivruttaraguvudilla- Adgaru

10. Nanna Janagalu.-Siddalingaiah

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Autobiography- Uchalya- Lakshman Gayekwad (Marathi)
 

Text: Uchalya

Author:Lakshman Gayekwad

Translation: Chandrakantha Pokle

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Creative Writings
 

 

1 Dialogue Writing

2 Essay writing

3 short story building

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. English Geethegalu- Sri, Publishers: B.M.Sri Smarka Prathistana, Bangalore-19 (2013)

2. Kannada Sahitya Charithre- Volumes 1-4, Editor: G. S. Shivarudrappa, Prasaranga, Bangalore Univeristy.

3. Hosagannada Kavitheya Mele English Kavyada Prabhava- S. Ananthanarayana

4. Hosagannadada Arunodaya- Srinivasa  Havanuru

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Hosagannda Sahitya- L.S. Sheshagiri Rao

2. Kannada Sahitya Sameekshe- G. S. Shivarudrappa

3. Bhavageethe- Dr. S. Prabhushankara

4. My Experiments with Truth- M.K. Gandhi

5. Ouru Keri- Siddalingaiah

Evaluation Pattern
 
Evaluation Pattern
 

CIA-1 Wikipedia Assignments- 20 Marks

CIA-2 Mid Semsester Examination- 50 Marks

CIA-3 Wikipedia Assignment-20 Marks

Attendance -10 Marks

End Semester Examination- 50 Marks

 
   

MUS331 - HARMONY - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course builds from content learned in MUS231 Music Foundations II. Music is a vehicle of expression that allows one to communicate experience directly. An individual situated within any culture can use their understanding of harmony to articulate their unique worldview to themselves and others. The inherent connections between western tonal harmony, neurology, and physiology grant students a means to explore and articulate their own worldview both musically and psychologically as such knowledge aids to increase emotional intelligence.

Course Objectives

  • Articulate the connections between musical, neurological, and physiological emotional responses of people.
  • Compose in four parts from a melody or a bass line (with or without lyrics).
  • Provision of a toolbox of musical techniques for exploring emotional psychology and self-expression.
  • Application of techniques learned to the development of own composition.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Analyse interconnecting structures, dimensions and elements that form the vocabulary of western tonal music.

CO2: Critically reflect and describe physiological, neurological, and emotional effects of music.

CO3: Solve musical problems using the musical structures, dimensions and elements described.

CO4: Use harmonization techniques to create and analyse music in four parts from a bass line or melody.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction
 

Introduction, Overview and Outline.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Four-Part Harmonization
 

Melody Construction and Tendency, Part-writing in Four Voices, Four-part Harmonisation, Fine-tuning Melodies.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Music and the Brain
 

Physiological Responses to Music; Chordal Tendencies and Neurotransmitters; Music and Emotion.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Navigating Tension
 

Prolonging the Dominant, Modulation, Application: Secondary Dominant and Diminished Seventh Chords, Modal Exchange and Mixture Chords, Tonicization.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Provided on Moodle platform for this unit.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Provided on Moodle platform for this unit.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Task

Marks Allocated

Weighting Adjustment

CIA I & III

 Aural Tasks and Composition Sketch

20 Marks (each)

 

CIA II

 Centralised Examination of Concepts Taught

50 Marks

 

 

Total CIA

90 Marks

Reduced: 45 Marks

 

Attendance

 

5 Marks

ESE

Centralised End-of-semester Examination

100 Marks

Reduced: 50 Marks

 

Total Mark

 

100 Marks

MUS341A - PIANO LITERATURE - I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Piano art results from the work of a composer who express their ideas through music, and a performer who embodies the creation of the composer into life. In every musical interpretation there exists two tendencies: pursuit toward a clean expression of composers’ thoughts and pursuit toward full self-expression of a performer. During this course students will explore the nuances of famous composers and interpreters of piano music. It will also help each student grow in their listening skills and perception of classical piano music.

Course Objectives

  • Enable students to learn the main features of each epoch of piano compositions.
  • Help develop students to describe compositional and performance aspects of major piano works throughout history.
  • Help students find parameters for critical analysis of musical material and interpretation.
  • Evaluate and compare styles and interpretations of western piano music.

Learning Outcome

CO 1: Compare differences between musical structure and musical interpretation.

CO 2: Evaluate the differences between piano music from Baroque, Classical and Romantic musical periods.

CO 3: Derive practice techniques for professional performance through empathetic listening.

CO 4: Critically analyse and review piano performances.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction
 

Outline; Overview; Empathetic Listening.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Discussing Musical Dimensions
 

Musical Dimensions and Structures; Composer and Performer; Interpretation Methods; Development of the Pianoforte.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Baroque period
 

Domenico Scarlatti, Jean-Philippe Rameau, François Couperin, Johann Sebastian Bach.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Classical Period
 

George Frederic Handel; Joseph Haydn; Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Ludwig Van Beethoven.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Romantic period
 

Robert Schumann; Franz Schubert; Frederic Chopin and Franz Liszt.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Required resources will be provided by the professor in charge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
 

1. F. E. Kirby (1995). Music for Piano: A short history. Portland, Oregon: Amadeus Press.

2. J. Peter Burkholder, Donald J Grout & Claude V. Paliska.(2014).  A History of Western Music. New York:  W.W. Nortan and Company.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Task

Marks Allocated

Weighting Adjustment

CIA I & III

 Reflective practice journal & Critical reflection on practice journal

20 Marks (each)

 

CIA II

Centralised written MSE

50 Marks

 

 

Total CIA

90 Marks

Reduced: 45 Marks

 

Attendance

 

5 Marks

ESE

Centralised written End-of-semester Examination

100 Marks

Reduced: 50 Marks

 

Total Mark

 

100 Marks

MUS341B - OPERA LITERATURE-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to a brief history of opera.Students will learn about the role of opera in the development of music in general from both theoretical and practical angles. During this course the students will get to know the names of famous opera composers and operas. There is also a focus on foundations of opera art, especially as they relate to libretto and music. Practical application of study arises in singing either famous arias and or ensemble choruses.

Course Objectives

  • Enables students to learn the main features of each epoch of opera
  • Analyse significant milestones in the development of opera
  • Recognize musical material from seminal operas by ear
  • Develop listening skills, perception and performing of western classical singing

Learning Outcome

CO1: Develop mind maps of seminal operas from the Baroque to Romantic Epochs.

CO2: Evaluate the underlying characters of each opera, their critical perspectives and social interactions.

CO3: Analyse librettos for historical, emotional and practical themes.

CO4: Recognize and identify historic and thematic material from musical extracts and cues.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:2
Introduction
 

Introduction, Overview and Outline.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Early Opera
 

"Orfeo" by Claudio Monteverdi; "Giulio Cesare" by George Frederic Handel; "Orfeo ed Euridice" by Christoph Willibald von Gluck.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Classical Opera
 

"The Marriage of Figaro" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart; "Don Giovanni" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Romantic Opera
 

"Don Carlos" by Giuseppe Verdi; "Nabucco" by Giuseppe Verdi; "Barber of Seville" by Gioachino Rossini; "La Traviata" by Giuseppe Verdi; "Rigoletto" by Giuseppe Verdi; "Libiamo" by Giuseppe Verdi.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Opera Verismo
 

"Cavalleria Rusticana" by Mascagni, "Pagliacci" by Leocavallo; "Carmen" by George Bizet; "Eugene Onegin" by Pytor Illich Tchaikovsky.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Required reading materials will be provided by the professor in charge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

DelDonna, A. R.; Polzonetti, P. (2009). The Cambridge Companion to Eighteenth-Century Opera. Cambridge University Press.

Burton D. Fisher " A History of Opera"

Burton D. Fisher "Opera Classics Library Series"; "Opera

Journeys Mini Guide Series"; "Opera Journeys Libretto Series"

Evaluation Pattern
 

Task

Marks Allocated

Weighting Adjustment

CIA I & III

Listening Test and Presentations

20 Marks (each)

 

CIA II

Mini Research Task

50 Marks

 

 

Total CIA

90 Marks

Reduced: 45 Marks

 

Attendance

 

5 Marks

ESE

Centralised End-of-semester Examination

100 Marks

Reduced: 50 Marks

 

Total Mark

 

100 Marks

 

MUS351A - MAJOR IN PIANO - III (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Major is a student's practical music specialization. It is the most important course among all music courses as it is the medium through which musical communication occurs. This course offers small-group and one-on-one interaction between instructor and learner. These interactions help in efficiently determining the theoretical and practical level of each student. The instructor will develop individual course plans to suit each student’s needs and requirements. The Major is a six-part course that will be completed throughout the three years of study in the music program. The course concentrates on developing an individual’s piano techniques.  

Learning Outcome

CO1: Combine aspects of interpretation, sociocultural context and technical ability to generate emotional expression within performance.

CO2: Demonstrate appropriate posture and playing techniques for fluent performance.

CO3: Translate musical notation, language and nomenclature of each piece and interpret relevant musical information from the score.

CO4: Design appropriate practice regime to suit individual performance requirements.

CO5: Develop Stage presence, presentation, and communication skills.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Individual Development
 

Students will be directed individually with respect to the following guidelines:

 

  • Implement theoretical understandings from other courses into practice.
  • Perform selected repertoire with appropriate technical ability and musical expression.
  • Understand personal strengths and weaknesses and develop practice habits accordingly.
Text Books And Reference Books:

Willl be provided by the Faculty in-charge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Formative assessment outline:

•      There will a Performance and Technical Exam scheduled either before or after the week of your theory MSE’s. Dates will be informed by the faculty in-charge in advance. 

•      The syllabus and the evaluation pattern for the technical exam remains the same as summative exam.

•      For the performance exam you need to perform at least one of the two pieces assigned. Evaluation rubrics and pattern remains the same as the Summative exam. 

•      Formative assessment is mandatory. You are not allowed to answer the summative exam if you fail to appear for the formative assessment.

•      If any changes on the above, the decision taken by the faculty in-charge in this regard will be final. 

 

Summative assessment outline:

Assessment Description:

The Assessment pattern will consist of two or more contrasting western classical piano pieces to be performed at the end of each semester. Repertoire selected by the instructor is tailored to each student's personal abilities.  

 

Task

Marks Allocated

Weighing adjustment

CIA 

No CIA I, II & III

-

 

ESE

End of semester Practical Examination: Solo Piano performance

100 marks

-

 

Practice Journal

10 marks

-

 

Total ESE

110 Marks

Reduced: 100marks

 

Total Marks

100 Marks

 

 To appear for the summative assessment:

1.     Min class attendance percentage for Major in Piano III should be 85%

2.     The student should have appeared for the formative assessment.

 If any changes in the above, the decision made by the piano coordinator will be final.

MUS351B - COLLABORATIVE PIANO III (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Collaborative piano is a six-part course that will be completed throughout the three years of study in the music program. The course is divided into technical, accompaniment and ensemble Units. The former unit concentrates on developing fundamental piano techniques through primary technical exercises, the latter focusing on general mentalities and nonverbal communication skills that contribute to successful group performances in differing piano ensemble settings (4-hands, 6-hands, multiple pianos, any other ensemble setting.) and/or vocal accompaniments.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Combine aspects of interpretation, sociocultural context and technical ability to generate emotional expression within the ensemble performance.

CO2: Develop appropriate ensemble practice techniques to solve various musical and technical problems within performance of repertoire.

CO3: Clearly communicate with ensemble members (musically and linguistically) to manage musical goals thus contributing to the ensemble performance.

CO4: Develop solid piano techniques through primary exercises which directly contributes to technical development of a students? piano repertoire.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Ensemble
 

This unit focusses on general mentalities and nonverbal communication skills that contribute to successful group performances in differing piano ensemble settings (4-hands, 6-hands, multiple pianos, choir etc.) 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Accompaniment
 

Focuses primarily on how to work with in a group (especially accompanying a vocalist). Developing skills like  coordination, fluency, sight-reading, etc while accompanying. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:1
Technical
 

This unit concentrates on developing fundamental piano techniques through primary technical exercises such as scales, arpeggios, broken chords, to name a few. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Will be provided by the faculty in-charge

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

Formative assessment outline:

•      There will a Ensemble Performance and Technical Exam scheduled either before or after the week of your theory MSE’s. Dates will be informed by the faculty in-charge in advance. 

•      The syllabus and the evaluation pattern for the technical exam remains the same as summative exam.

•      Formative assessment is mandatory. You are not allowed to answer the summative exam if you fail to appear for the formative assessment. 

•      If any changes on the above, the decision taken by the faculty in-charge in this regard will be final. 

 

Summative Assessment Description:

The testing pattern will consist of:

1. Technical exercises to be performed at the end of each semester as per the technical exam syllabus.

2. Contribute to collaborative event (piano ensemble, piano accompaniment, choir) and any event that involves team work as directed by the faculty in-charge.

Please note:

Min class attendance percentage for Collaborative Piano should be 85% to appear for the Final ESE. Else the student will not be able allowed to answer the practical exam and will be marked Fail. The student shoudl also have appeared for the formative exam. 

If any changes on the above, the decision of the piano coordinator is final. 

 

Exam

Task

Marks Allotted

Weighting adjustment

CIA

NO CIA I, II & III

-

-

ESE

End Semester practical exam:

-

-

 

Ensemble 

100

40

 

Accompaniment 

50

30

 

Technical 

50

30

 

Total ESE marks

200

100

 

Min. overall pass marks

-

40

MUS352A - MAJOR IN VOICE III (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:70
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

A Major is a student's practical music specialization. It is the most important course among all music courses as it is the medium through which musical communication occurs. This course offers small-group interactions between instructor and learners. These interactions help in efficiently determining the theoretical and practical level of each student's vocal abilities. The instructor will determine and develop groups to suit each student’s needs and requirements. The Major is a six-part course that will be completed throughout the three years of study in the music program. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Implement theoretical understandings from other courses into practice.

CO2: Perform selected repertoire with appropriate technical ability and musical expression.

CO3: Evaluate personal strengths and weaknesses and develop practice habits accordingly.

CO4: Demonstrate resonance in academic singing using physical location and conscious inclusion of various vocal resonances in the work.

CO5: Demonstrate the fundamentals of psychological and physical preparation for the stage performance.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Principles of Singing
 

Equal Volume of Vowels, Aesthetics of Singing, Stable Vowels, Vocal Resonances, Active Pause.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Articulation in Singing
 

Open Syllable, Masking Articulation of Vowels, Precise and Active Articulation of Consonants.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Not required

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Not required

Evaluation Pattern

The testing pattern will consist of music to be performed at the end of each semester. 

Repertoire selected by the instructor is tailored to each student's personal abilities.

 

No CIA I, II & III

 

End semester examination – practical exam; 100 marks 

MUS352B - COLLABORATIVE VOICE III (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:15
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course offers small to large group interaction between the instructor and the students. These interactions help students by giving them the opportunity to sing in various combinations of choral groups to a professional standard. The course joins with Major in Voice (solo) and is part of holistic performance education.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate professional musical teamwork whilst working in different vocal ensembles (duet, trio, quartet and choir)

CO2: Contribute to group performances across departments.

CO3: Evaluate effective methods for solving problems when working with teams.

CO4: Create necessary administrative tools to easily manage projects within teams

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Technical Work
 

Vocalise, Scales, Arpeggios, Articulations, Exercises

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Self-Accompaniment
 

Playing of Vocal Exercises on Piano

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Ensemble Project
 

Participation, Dependability, Punctuality, Communication, Musicality

Text Books And Reference Books:

Not required 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Not required 

Evaluation Pattern

No CIA I, II or III

End semester examination – practical exam; 100 marks

PSY332 - SOCIOCULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description

This course is offered to the third semester undergraduate students of psychology. This course will help the student to understand behaviour in a social and cultural context. It also seeks to bridge the gap between psychology and theatre by discussing the performative aspects of the self in a social context. It highlights human behaviour by exploring the relationship between aesthetics, arts, creativity, and psychology. The course also addresses the psychology of diversity and principles of social influence which enable one to understand the interface between psychology, culture and society.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcome

After the completion of this course students will be able:

To understand the sociocultural foundations of behaviour.

To appreciate the relationship between the self and the role of emotion in performance.

To comprehend the interface between psychology, culture and society.

To sensitize on the importance of the principles of persuasion and group processes in theatre.

 

Level of knowledge:

 

Knowledge of the courses studied at the higher secondary level in any discipline.

Learning Outcome

1: Analyze the factors that contribute to socio-cultural foundations of behaviour

2: Interpret the implications of various socio-cultural theories

3: Identify the role of self in the socio-cultural context

4: Reflect upon the various models of self-concept.

5: Evaluate the essence of group dynamics from a socio-cultural perspective.

6: Identify different forms of diversity within and across groups and illustrate ways in which they have or will apply them in interactions with others

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Sociocultural psychology
 

History- Origin and Development of Modern Social Psychology; Social psychology in India.

Theories of social psychology - Motivational, Learning, Cognitive, Decision-making, Interdependence, Socio-cultural, Evolutionary, and Mid-range theories.

Approaches to Culture: Symbolic, activity and individualistic; Etics and Emics; Methods of understanding culture.

Interface between psychology, culture, and society; Contemporary trends in the Indian context.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
The self in a social context
 

The Self concept – Beginnings, Formation, Self- schemas and Multicultural perspective

Self-presentation – Types of self presentation, Self presentation strategies, False modesty, Self-handicapping, Impression management, Self –monitoring, Goffman’s Dramaturgical model.

         Self-esteem - Development and Consequences

Perceiving persons- Attribution theories; Attributional errors & biases, Integration, Confirmation bias

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Psychology of diversity
 

What is diversity, Types of diversity – Gender, race, disability, religion, social class, sexual orientation, physical appearance; Making sense of diversity; Cognitive processes in diversity

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Aesthetics, emotions, and the arts
 

Sociocultural perspectives of emotions, Context dependent emotion regulation,  Indian perspective on emotion (Rasa Theory ), Body language and  culture, Cultural variations in expressions of emotions. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Social influences
 

Persuasion: Paths to persuasion, Elements of persuasion – Communicator, message content, audience and channel of communication.

Nature and types of groups; Group performance – Types of tasks , Brainstorming ;  Group decision making – Biases in information, Group polarization , Group think ; Social facilitation & Social loafing

Group dynamics and performance 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Blaine B.E. (2007). Diversity. Sage (London).

Kassin, Saul M; Fein, Steven; Markus, Hazel; Brehm, Sharon S. (2008). Social Psychology. Houghton Miffin (Boston)

 

Matsumato, David; Juang, Linda. (2004). Culture and psychology. Thomson (Australia).

Taylor, Peplau & Sears. (2006). Social psychology. Pearson Education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Dalal, A.K. & Misra, G. Social psychology in India: Evolution and emerging trends. In Dalal , A.K.& Misra, G. (Eds.) New directions in Indian psychology.  New Delhi: Sage.

Davidson.D.(1985). Adolescent in search of her identity. Journal of Analytical Psychology.Vol.30 (4), p339-346.

Lynn, S.J. & Payne, D.G. (1997). Memory as the theatre of the Past: The psychology of False Memories. Current directions in psychological science (Wiley-Blackwell). Vol. 6 (3) p55-55.

Pataki, S.P., & Mackenzie, S.A (2012). Modeling Social Activism and Teaching about Violence against Women Through theatre education. Psychology of women quarterly. Vol. 36(4). P 500-503.

Rosenberg.,T. (2013). Harnessing Positive Peer Pressure to Create Atruism. Social research.

Rutten, E.A.,Biesta, G.J.J., Dekovic, M., Stams, G.J.J.M, Schuengel, C.,  & Verweel,P (2010). Using forum theatre in organised youth soccer to positively influence antisocial and prosocial behaviour: a pilot study. Journal of moral education. Mar2010, Vol. 39(1) p65-78.

Sonn, C.C., Quayle, A,F.,Belanji.B.,Baker, A.M.(2015). Responding to racialization through arts practice: The case of participatory theatre. Journal of community psychology. Vol 43(2), p 244- 259. Vol. 80 (2) p 491-510.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - Written / individual assignment - 10 marks

CIA II - Mid Semester Examination - 25 marks

CIA III - Activity based assignment - 10 marks

Attendance - 5 marks

End Semester Examination - 50 marks

Total Marks - 100

PSY352 - PERSONAL GROWTH (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The goal of personal growth classes is to educate the whole person in mind and body, thereby preparing to be professionally competent individuals who understand the need for maintaining a healthy lifestyle and are mindful about their personal and social actions.  Emotional Intelligence and Personality assessments is chosen for personal growth lab because it increases students’ awareness and understanding about their own emotions. The course flows a psychoeducation model of curriculum traction using assessments and class activities.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Assess emotional intelligence, and Personal attributes and interpret and relate them to their everyday lives.

CO2: Assess personal strengths and wellness to understand oneself better.

CO3: Assess behaviors related to personal responsibility including (but not limited to) healthy attitudes and behaviors, refusal skills, decision-making, and risk-taking behavior.

CO4: Identify the key components of personal fitness and describe the benefits of regular physical activity and a healthy diet.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Personal Growth and Development
 

Pre-assessment; The self-concept and self-esteem- Facilitating self-awareness through reflective exercises, Implementation of mindfulness skills, self-awareness questionnaires/inventories; Understanding and expressing emotions; Managing difficult emotions; Applying emotional intelligence; Understanding the role of culture, values and beliefs in understanding the self through assessments and reflection; Writing self-assessment and reflection papers, Ethical issues  Managing interpersonal conflicts; Self-disclosure in close relationships, values development and self-care

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Health and Wellness
 

Illness- wellness continuum; components of wellness (WHO); The Bop-psycho-social model of health to understand Stress, mechanisms to deal with stress; Lifestyles-sleep, body image-and its impact on health and wellbeing; healthy relationships; Health compromising behaviors, Recognizing and Avoiding Addiction and Drug Abuse; Assessments and Writing self-assessment and reflections

Text Books And Reference Books:

http://www.tecweb.org/styles/gardner.html

http://www.cnbc.ca/uploads/File/strengthen/personal_growth_plan.pdf

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Stevic, C. R., & Ward, R. M. (2008). Initiating personal growth: The role of recognition and life satisfaction on the development of college students. Social Indicators Research, 89(3), 523.

Adler, R. B., & Proctor II, R.F. (2012). Looking out/Looking in (14th ed.). Wadsworth Cengage Learning

Nevid, J. S., & Rathus, S. A. (2015). Psychology and the challenges of life (13th ed.). John Wiley & Sons.

Edlin, G., & Golanty, E. (2007). Health and wellness (9th ed.). Jones & Bartlett Publishers.

Hoeger, W.K.& Hoeger, S.A. (2015). Lifetime Physical Fitness and Wellness. (13th Ed.) Cengage Learning. 

Evaluation Pattern

Continuous Internal Evaluations (CIAs) – 100 Marks

  • CIA 1: Individual Assignment (20 marks) +Class participation & Supervisor Feedback (5 marks)- 25 Marks

  • CIA 2: Individual assignment   (20 marks) +Class participation & Supervisor Feedback (5 marks)- 25 Marks

  • CIA 3: Department-Level Examination -50 Marks 

SAN321 - SANSKRIT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Sundara Kanda is the only chapter of the Ramayana in which the hero is not Rama, but rather Hanuman. The work depicts the adventures of Hanuman and his selflessness, strength, and devotion to Rama are emphasized in the text. Bhoja only wrote 5 kāṇdas (up to the Sundarakāṇda), and there is a story about this: that he was inspired to write this work the night before a battle, that as he finished the Sundarakāṇda it was time to go, and that he announced that the Yuddhakāṇda would be enacted in the battlefield against the invader, but sadly he never returned. Others have composed a Yuddhakāṇda to complete the work.

The main objective of the students is to understand the champu Kavyas based on the sam.  

The Origin and development of the Champu.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To analyse the content of the text in detail with examples

CO2: To Deliberate the classification and characters of the epic

CO3: To understand the delight of the text.

CO4: To demonstrate an increased ability to read and understand Sanskrit texts

CO5: To understand the prefixes and suffixes and changing the sentences in grammar.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:35
champu
 

Origin and developmetn of Champu kavyas

Five Important Champus

Level of knowledge: Basic/conceptual/ Analytical

Shlokas 1 -60 Hnumantha¨s voyage to Lanka and searching for Seetha Description of city Lanka , Characters of Champu Kavya 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Grammar
 

Prayogas and Krudantha

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Language skills
 

Translation of Given passage from English to Sanskrit 

Writing composition in sanskrit on the given topic in Sanskrit

Text Books And Reference Books:

Sundarakanda from Bhaja´s Champu Ramayana 

Chitrakalayaa: ugagamam vikaasam ca

origin and development of painting through Vedas and Puranas

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

   

Reference Books:-

 

1)      Sundarakanda from “Champuramayana of Bhoja  

2)      Sanskrit Grammar by M.R. Kale.

3)       History of Sanskrit literature by Dr.M.S. Shivakumaraswamy.

4)       History of Sanskrit literature by Krishnamachari.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 Wikipedia assignment

CIA 2 mid semester examination

CIA 3 Wikipedia assignment

TAM321 - TAMIL (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Araillakiyam, bakthi illakiyam, ikala illakiyamn the major allakiyams.The influence myths and puranas are delineated through the good deeds for a better lifestyle.The  Cultural Studies part will have an overview of Indian painting both traditional and modern with special reference to mythology and literature

India 2020- Abdul Kalam

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Recall and categorize the concepts of literature.

CO2: Understand the true essence of the texts, and inculcate them in their daily lives.

CO3: Recognize and apply the moral values and ethics in their learning.

CO4: Comprehend the concepts in literature and appreciate the literary text.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Ara illakiyam
 

1. Thirukural

2. Avvai kural

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Bhakthi illakiyam
 

1. Thiru vasagam

2. Kambar andhadhi

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ik kaala illakiyam
 

Naatu pura padalgal

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Prose
 

India 2020- Dr. Abdul Kalam

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:3
Common Topic and visual text
 

1. Common topic: Oviyam

2. Visual text : nattupuviyal

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:2
Grammer
 

Sollu illakanam

Text Books And Reference Books:

Thirukkural-Bhoombugar pathipagam- puliyur kesigan urai, Chennai- 08

Kammbarin Ainthu noolgal- Vanathi pathupagam- Dr. R. Rajagopalachariyar,  Chennai- 18

Nathu pura illakiyam- Ki Va jaganathan- malai aruvi- Monarch achagam- chennai

India 2020- APJ Abdul kalam- puthaiyuram aandugaluku aga oru thoali nooku,  New century book house, chennai

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading